Best 2017, Best Books, Fiction, Literature

The Best Fiction Books of 2017 (A Year-End List Aggregation)

December 28, 2017

“What are the best Fiction books of 2017?” We aggregated 51 year-end lists and ranked the 571 unique titles by how many times they appeared in an attempt to answer that very question!

There are thousands of year-end lists released every year and like we do in our weekly Best Book articles, we wanted to see which books appear the most. The top 49 books, all of which appeared on 5 or more best Fiction book lists, are ranked below with images, summaries, and links for more information or to purchase. The remaining 500+ books, as well as the top book lists, are at the bottom of the page.

Make sure to take a look at our other Best of 2017 book lists:

You can also take a look at our Best Fiction books from last year as well as all the other Best 2016 articles!

Happy Scrolling!

 



Top 49 Fiction Books Of 2017



49 .) Autumn by Ali Smith

Lists It Appears On:

  • Chicago Tribune
  • Southern Living
  • The New York Times
  • The Washington Post
  • theWhat

“Autumn. Season of mists and mellow fruitfulness. Two old friends—Daniel, a centenarian, and Elisabeth, born in 1984—look to both the future and the past as the United Kingdom stands divided by a historic, once-in-a-generation summer. Love is won, love is lost. Hope is hand-in-hand with hopelessness. The seasons roll round, as ever.

A luminous meditation on the meaning of richness and harvest and worth, Autumn is the first installment of Ali Smith’s Seasonal quartet, and it casts an eye over our own time: Who are we? What are we made of? Shakespearean jeu d’esprit, Keatsian melancholy, the sheer bright energy of 1960s pop art. Wide-ranging in time-scale and light-footed through histories, Autumn is an unforgettable story about aging and time and love—and stories themselves.”

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48 .) Beartown by Fredrik Backman

Lists It Appears On:

  • Amazon
  • Canadian Gift Guide
  • Goodreads
  • Indigo
  • Multnomah County

From the New York Times bestselling author of A Man Called Ove My Grandmother Asked Me To Tell You She s Sorry and Britt Marie Was Here comes a poignant charming novel about a forgotten town fractured by scandal and the amateur hockey team that might just change everything Winning a junior ice hockey championship might not mean a lot to the average person but it means everything to the residents of Beartown a community slowly being eaten alive by unemployment and the surrounding wilderness A victory like this would draw national attention to the ailing town it could attract government funding and an influx of talented athletes who would choose Beartown over the big nearby cities A victory like this would certainly mean everything to Amat a short scrawny teenager who is treated like an outcast everywhere but on the ice to Kevin a star player just on the cusp of securing his golden future in the NHL and to Peter their dedicated general manager whose own professional hockey career ended in tragedy At first it seems like the team might have a shot at fulfilling the dreams of their entire town But one night at a drunken celebration following a key win something happens between Kevin and the general manager s daughter and the next day everything seems to have changed Accusations are made and like ripples on a pond they travel through all of Beartown leaving no resident unaffected With so much riding on the success of the team the line between loyalty and betrayal becomes difficult to discern At last it falls to one young man to find the courage to speak the truth that it seems no one else wants to hear Fredrik Backman knows that we are forever shaped by the places we call home and in this emotionally powerful sweetly insightful story he explores what can happen when we carry the heavy weight of other people s dreams on our shoulders

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47 .) Bluebird, Bluebird by Attica Locke

Lists It Appears On:

  • Dallas News
  • Financial Times
  • MPR News
  • Multnomah County
  • Southern Living

“When it comes to law and order, East Texas plays by its own rules–a fact that Darren Mathews, a black Texas Ranger, knows all too well. Deeply ambivalent about growing up black in the lone star state, he was the first in his family to get as far away from Texas as he could. Until duty called him home.

When his allegiance to his roots puts his job in jeopardy, he travels up Highway 59 to the small town of Lark, where two murders–a black lawyer from Chicago and a local white woman–have stirred up a hornet’s nest of resentment. Darren must solve the crimes–and save himself in the process–before Lark’s long-simmering racial fault lines erupt. From a writer and producer of the Emmy winning Fox TV show Empire, Bluebird, Bluebird is a rural noir suffused with the unique music, color, and nuance of East Texas.”

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46 .) Goodbye Vitamin by Rachel Khong

Lists It Appears On:

  • Vol.1 Brooklyn
  • BuzzFeed
  • Electric Lit
  • Huffington post
  • Readings

“Freshly disengaged from her fiancé and feeling that life has not turned out quite the way she planned, thirty-year-old Ruth quits her job, leaves town and arrives at her parents’ home to find that situation more complicated than she’d realized. Her father, a prominent history professor, is losing his memory and is only erratically lucid. Ruth’s mother, meanwhile, is lucidly erratic. But as Ruth’s father’s condition intensifies, the comedy in her situation takes hold, gently transforming her all her grief.

Told in captivating glimpses and drawn from a deep well of insight, humor, and unexpected tenderness, Goodbye, Vitamin pilots through the loss, love, and absurdity of finding one’s footing in this life.”

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45 .) Homesick for Another World by Ottessa Moshfegh

Lists It Appears On:

  • Entropy
  • Huffington post
  • Southern Living
  • The Globe
  • The New York Times

“Ottessa Moshfegh’s debut novel Eileen was one of the literary events of 2015. Garlanded with critical acclaim, it was named a book of the year by The Washington Post and the San Francisco Chronicle, nominated for a National Book Critics Circle Award, short-listed for the Man Booker Prize, and won the PEN/Hemingway Award for debut fiction. But as many critics noted, Moshfegh is particularly held in awe for her short stories. Homesick for Another World is the rare case where an author’s short story collection is if anything more anticipated than her novel.

And for good reason. There’s something eerily unsettling about Ottessa Moshfegh’s stories, something almost dangerous, while also being delightful, and even laugh-out-loud funny. Her characters are all unsteady on their feet in one way or another; they all yearn for connection and betterment, though each in very different ways, but they are often tripped up by their own baser impulses and existential insecurities. Homesick for Another World is a master class in the varieties of self-deception across the gamut of individuals representing the human condition. But part of the unique quality of her voice, the echt Moshfeghian experience, is the way the grotesque and the outrageous are infused with tenderness and compassion. Moshfegh is our Flannery O’Connor, and Homesick for Another World is her Everything That Rises Must Converge or A Good Man is Hard to Find. The flesh is weak; the timber is crooked; people are cruel to each other, and stupid, and hurtful. But beauty comes from strange sources. And the dark energy surging through these stories is powerfully invigorating. We’re in the hands of an author with a big mind, a big heart, blazing chops, and a political acuity that is needle-sharp. The needle hits the vein before we even feel the prick.”

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44 .) Norse Mythology by Neil Gaiman

Lists It Appears On:

  • Barnes & Noble
  • Hudson Booksellers
  • Indigo
  • MPR News
  • The Washington Post

“In Norse Mythology, Gaiman stays true to the myths in envisioning the major Norse pantheon: Odin, the highest of the high, wise, daring, and cunning; Thor, Odin’s son, incredibly strong yet not the wisest of gods; and Loki―son of a giant―blood brother to Odin and a trickster and unsurpassable manipulator.

Gaiman fashions these primeval stories into a novelistic arc that begins with the genesis of the legendary nine worlds and delves into the exploits of deities, dwarfs, and giants. Once, when Thor’s hammer is stolen, Thor must disguise himself as a woman―difficult with his beard and huge appetite―to steal it back. More poignant is the tale in which the blood of Kvasir―the most sagacious of gods―is turned into a mead that infuses drinkers with poetry. The work culminates in Ragnarok, the twilight of the gods and rebirth of a new time and people.”

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43 .) Sorry to Disrupt the Peace by Patty Yumi Cottrell

Lists It Appears On:

  • BuzzFeed
  • Electric Lit
  • Entropy
  • Large Hearted Boy
  • Vol.1 Brooklyn

“Helen Moran is thirty-two years old, single, childless, college-educated, and partially employed as a guardian of troubled young people in New York. She’s accepting a delivery from IKEA in her shared studio apartment when her uncle calls to break the news: Helen’s adoptive brother is dead.

According to the internet, there are six possible reasons why her brother might have killed himself. But Helen knows better: she knows that six reasons is only shorthand for the abyss. Helen also knows that she alone is qualified to launch a serious investigation into his death, so she purchases a one-way ticket to Milwaukee. There, as she searches her childhood home and attempts to uncover why someone would choose to die, she will face her estranged family, her brother’s few friends, and the overzealous grief counselor, Chad Lambo; she may also discover what it truly means to be alive.”

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42 .) Sour Heart by Jenny Zhang

Lists It Appears On:

  • Amber Sparks
  • BuzzFeed
  • Entropy
  • Shelf Awareness
  • The Spinoff

“A fresh new voice emerges with the arrival of Sour Heart, establishing Jenny Zhang as a frank and subversive interpreter of the immigrant experience in America. Her stories cut across generations and continents, moving from the fraught halls of a public school in Flushing, Queens, to the tumultuous streets of Shanghai, China, during the Cultural Revolution of the 1960s. In the absence of grown-ups, latchkey kids experiment on each other until one day the experiments turn violent; an overbearing mother abandons her artistic aspirations to come to America but relives her glory days through karaoke; and a shy loner struggles to master English so she can speak to God.

Narrated by the daughters of Chinese immigrants who fled imperiled lives as artists back home only to struggle to stay afloat—dumpster diving for food and scamming Atlantic City casino buses to make a buck—these seven stories showcase Zhang’s compassion, moral courage, and a perverse sense of humor reminiscent of Portnoy’s Complaint. A darkly funny and intimate rendering of girlhood, Sour Heart examines what it means to belong to a family, to find your home, leave it, reject it, and return again.”

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41 .) Stephen Florida by Gabe Habash

Lists It Appears On:

  • Chicago Review Of Books
  • Electric Lit
  • Entropy
  • Huffington post
  • MPR News

Foxcatcher meets The Art of Fielding, Stephen Florida follows a college wrestler in his senior season, when every practice, every match, is a step closer to greatness and a step further from sanity. Profane, manic, and tipping into the uncanny, it’s a story of loneliness, obsession, and the drive to leave a mark.

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40 .) The Answers by Catherine Lacey

Lists It Appears On:

  • Chicago Review Of Books
  • Electric Lit
  • Huffington post
  • The Portable Infinite
  • Thrillist

“Mary Parsons is broke. Dead broke, really: between an onslaught of medical bills and a mountain of credit card debt, she has been pushed to the brink. Hounded by bill collectors and still plagued by the painful and bizarre symptoms that doctors couldn’t diagnose, Mary seeks relief from a holistic treatment called Pneuma Adaptive Kinesthesia―PAKing, for short. Miraculously, it works. But PAKing is prohibitively expensive. Like so many young adults trying to make ends meet in New York City, Mary scours Craigslist and bulletin boards for a second job, and eventually lands an interview for a high-paying gig that’s even stranger than her symptoms or the New Agey PAKing.

Mary’s new job title is Emotional Girlfriend in the “Girlfriend Experiment”―the brainchild of a wealthy and infamous actor, Kurt Sky, who has hired a team of biotech researchers to solve the problem of how to build and maintain the perfect romantic relationship, cast – ing himself as the experiment’s only constant. Around Kurt, several women orbit as his girlfriends with spe – cific functions. There’s a Maternal Girlfriend who folds his laundry, an Anger Girlfriend who fights with him, a Mundanity Girlfriend who just hangs around his loft, and a whole team of girlfriends to take care of Intimacy. With so little to lose, Mary falls headfirst into Kurt’s messy, ego-driven simulacrum of human connection.”

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39 .) The Book of Joan by Lidia Yuknavitch

Lists It Appears On:

  • Amber Sparks
  • Electric Lit
  • Entropy
  • The New York Times
  • The Washington Post

“In the near future, world wars have transformed the earth into a battleground. Fleeing the unending violence and the planet’s now-radioactive surface, humans have regrouped to a mysterious platform known as CIEL, hovering over their erstwhile home. The changed world has turned evolution on its head: the surviving humans have become sexless, hairless, pale-white creatures floating in isolation, inscribing stories upon their skin.

Out of the ranks of the endless wars rises Jean de Men, a charismatic and bloodthirsty cult leader who turns CIEL into a quasi-corporate police state. A group of rebels unite to dismantle his iron rule—galvanized by the heroic song of Joan, a child-warrior who possesses a mysterious force that lives within her and communes with the earth. When de Men and his armies turn Joan into a martyr, the consequences are astonishing. And no one—not the rebels, Jean de Men, or even Joan herself—can foresee the way her story and unique gift will forge the destiny of an entire world for generations.”

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38 .) The Dark Dark by Samantha Hunt

Lists It Appears On:

  • Amber Sparks
  • BuzzFeed
  • Chicago Review Of Books
  • Entropy
  • Huffington post

Step into The Dark Dark, where an award-winning, acclaimed novelist debuts her first collection of short stories and conjures entire universes in just a few pages―conjures, splits in half, mines for humor, destroys with absurdity, and regenerates. In prose that sparkles and haunts, Samantha Hunt playfully pushes the bounds of the expected and fills every corner with vibrant life, imagining numerous ways in which the weird might poke its way through the mundane. Each of these ten haunting, inventive tales brings us to the brink―of creation, mortality and immortality, infidelity and transformation, technological innovation and historical revision, loneliness and communion, and every kind of love.

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37 .) The Essex Serpent by Sarah Perry

Lists It Appears On:

  • Multnomah County
  • Paste
  • Southern Living
  • The New York Times
  • The Washington Post

“An exquisitely talented young British author makes her American debut with this rapturously acclaimed historical novel, set in late nineteenth-century England, about an intellectually minded young widow, a pious vicar, and a rumored mythical serpent that explores questions about science and religion, skepticism, and faith, independence and love.

When Cora Seaborne’s brilliant, domineering husband dies, she steps into her new life as a widow with as much relief as sadness: her marriage was not a happy one. Wed at nineteen, this woman of exceptional intelligence and curiosity was ill-suited for the role of society wife. Seeking refuge in fresh air and open space in the wake of the funeral, Cora leaves London for a visit to coastal Essex, accompanied by her inquisitive and obsessive eleven-year old son, Francis, and the boy’s nanny, Martha, her fiercely protective friend.

While admiring the sites, Cora learns of an intriguing rumor that has arisen further up the estuary, of a fearsome creature said to roam the marshes claiming human lives. After nearly 300 years, the mythical Essex Serpent is said to have returned, taking the life of a young man on New Year’s Eve. A keen amateur naturalist with no patience for religion or superstition, Cora is immediately enthralled, and certain that what the local people think is a magical sea beast may be a previously undiscovered species. Eager to investigate, she is introduced to local vicar William Ransome. Will, too, is suspicious of the rumors. But unlike Cora, this man of faith is convinced the rumors are caused by moral panic, a flight from true belief.”

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36 .) The Golden House by Salman Rushdie

Lists It Appears On:

  • Entropy
  • Noted
  • Southern Living
  • The Globe
  • The Guardian

“On the day of Barack Obama’s inauguration, an enigmatic billionaire from foreign shores takes up residence in the architectural jewel of “the Gardens,” a cloistered community in New York’s Greenwich Village. The neighborhood is a bubble within a bubble, and the residents are immediately intrigued by the eccentric newcomer and his family. Along with his improbable name, untraceable accent, and unmistakable whiff of danger, Nero Golden has brought along his three adult sons: agoraphobic, alcoholic Petya, a brilliant recluse with a tortured mind; Apu, the flamboyant artist, sexually and spiritually omnivorous, famous on twenty blocks; and D, at twenty-two the baby of the family, harboring an explosive secret even from himself. There is no mother, no wife; at least not until Vasilisa, a sleek Russian expat, snags the septuagenarian Nero, becoming the queen to his king—a queen in want of an heir.

Our guide to the Goldens’ world is their neighbor René, an ambitious young filmmaker. Researching a movie about the Goldens, he ingratiates himself into their household. Seduced by their mystique, he is inevitably implicated in their quarrels, their infidelities, and, indeed, their crimes. Meanwhile, like a bad joke, a certain comic-book villain embarks upon a crass presidential run that turns New York upside-down.”

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35 .) The Idiot by Elif Batuman

Lists It Appears On:

  • BuzzFeed
  • Entropy
  • The New York Times
  • Thrillist
  • Vol.1 Brooklyn

“The year is 1995, and email is new. Selin, the daughter of Turkish immigrants, arrives for her freshman year at Harvard. She signs up for classes in subjects she has never heard of, befriends her charismatic and worldly Serbian classmate, Svetlana, and, almost by accident, begins corresponding with Ivan, an older mathematics student from Hungary. Selin may have barely spoken to Ivan, but with each email they exchange, the act of writing seems to take on new and increasingly mysterious meanings.

At the end of the school year, Ivan goes to Budapest for the summer, and Selin heads to the Hungarian countryside, to teach English in a program run by one of Ivan’s friends. On the way, she spends two weeks visiting Paris with Svetlana. Selin’s summer in Europe does not resonate with anything she has previously heard about the typical experiences of American college students, or indeed of any other kinds of people. For Selin, this is a journey further inside herself: a coming to grips with the ineffable and exhilarating confusion of first love, and with the growing consciousness that she is doomed to become a writer.

With superlative emotional and intellectual sensitivity, mordant wit, and pitch-perfect style, Batuman dramatizes the uncertainty of life on the cusp of adulthood. Her prose is a rare and inimitable combination of tenderness and wisdom; its logic as natural and inscrutable as that of memory itself. The Idiot is a heroic yet self-effacing reckoning with the terror and joy of becoming a person in a world that is as intoxicating as it is disquieting. Batuman’s fiction is unguarded against both life’s affronts and its beauty–and has at its command the complete range of thinking and feeling which they entail.”

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34 .) The Refugees by Viet Thanh Nguyen

Lists It Appears On:

  • BuzzFeed
  • King County Library
  • Michael Magras
  • Multnomah County
  • The New York Times

With the coruscating gaze that informed The Sympathizer, in The Refugees Viet Thanh Nguyen gives voice to lives led between two worlds, the adopted homeland and the country of birth. From a young Vietnamese refugee who suffers profound culture shock when he comes to live with two gay men in San Francisco, to a woman whose husband is suffering from dementia and starts to confuse her for a former lover, to a girl living in Ho Chi Minh City whose older half-sister comes back from America having seemingly accomplished everything she never will, the stories are a captivating testament to the dreams and hardships of immigration. The second piece of fiction by a major new voice in American letters, The Refugees is a beautifully written and sharply observed book about the aspirations of those who leave one country for another, and the relationships and desires for self-fulfillment that define our lives.

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33 .) The Seven Husbands of Evelyn Hugo by Taylor Jenkins Reid

Lists It Appears On:

  • Book Riot
  • Canadian Gift Guide
  • Island Books
  • Paste
  • Sit Tableside

“Aging and reclusive Hollywood movie icon Evelyn Hugo is finally ready to tell the truth about her glamorous and scandalous life. But when she chooses unknown magazine reporter Monique Grant for the job, no one is more astounded than Monique herself. Why her? Why now?

Monique is not exactly on top of the world. Her husband has left her, and her professional life is going nowhere. Regardless of why Evelyn has selected her to write her biography, Monique is determined to use this opportunity to jumpstart her career.

Summoned to Evelyn’s luxurious apartment, Monique listens in fascination as the actress tells her story. From making her way to Los Angeles in the 1950s to her decision to leave show business in the ‘80s, and, of course, the seven husbands along the way, Evelyn unspools a tale of ruthless ambition, unexpected friendship, and a great forbidden love. Monique begins to feel a very real connection to the legendary star, but as Evelyn’s story near its conclusion, it becomes clear that her life intersects with Monique’s own in tragic and irreversible ways.”

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32 .) Transit by Rachel Cusk

Lists It Appears On:

  • Southern Living
  • The Globe
  • The New York Times
  • The Seattle Times
  • Time

“In the wake of her family’s collapse, a writer and her two young sons move to London. The process of this upheaval is the catalyst for a number of transitions―personal, moral, artistic, and practical―as she endeavors to construct a new reality for herself and her children. In the city, she is made to confront aspects of living that she has, until now, avoided, and to consider questions of vulnerability and power, death and renewal, in what becomes her struggle to reattach herself to, and believe in, life.

Filtered through the impersonal gaze of its keenly intelligent protagonist, Transit sees Rachel Cusk delve deeper into the themes first raised in her critically acclaimed novel Outline and offers up a penetrating and moving reflection on childhood and fate, the value of suffering, the moral problems of personal responsibility, and the mystery of change.

In this second book of a precise, short, yet epic cycle, Cusk describes the most elemental experiences, the liminal qualities of life. She captures with unsettling restraint and honesty the longing to both inhabit and flee one’s life, and the wrenching ambivalence animating our desire to feel real.”

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31 .) 4 3 2 1 by Paul Auster

Lists It Appears On:

  • Amazon
  • Noted
  • The Globe
  • The New York Times
  • The Portable Infinite
  • The Washington Post

Nearly two weeks early, on March 3, 1947, in the maternity ward of Beth Israel Hospital in Newark, New Jersey, Archibald Isaac Ferguson, the one and only child of Rose and Stanley Ferguson, is born. From that single beginning, Ferguson’s life will take four simultaneous and independent fictional paths. Four identical Fergusons made of the same DNA, four boys who are the same boy, go on to lead four parallel and entirely different lives. Family fortunes diverge. Athletic skills and sex lives and friendships and intellectual passions contrast. Each Ferguson falls under the spell of the magnificent Amy Schneiderman, yet each Amy and each Ferguson have a relationship like no other. Meanwhile, readers will take in each Ferguson’s pleasures and ache from each Ferguson’s pains, as the mortal plot of each Ferguson’s life rushes on.

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30 .) All Grown Up by Jami Attenberg

Lists It Appears On:

  • Book Riot
  • Bustle
  • BuzzFeed
  • Electric Lit
  • Huffington post
  • Vol.1 Brooklyn

Who is Andrea Bern? When her therapist asks the question, Andrea knows the right things to say: she’s a designer, a friend, a daughter, a sister. But it’s what she leaves unsaid—she’s alone, a drinker, a former artist, a shrieker in bed, captain of the sinking ship that is her flesh—that feels the most true. Everyone around her seems to have an entirely different idea of what it means to be an adult: her best friend, Indigo, is getting married; her brother—who miraculously seems unscathed by their shared tumultuous childhood—and sister-in-law are having a hoped-for baby; and her friend Matthew continues to wholly devote himself to making dark paintings at the cost of being flat broke.

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29 .) Conversations with Friends by Sally Rooney

Lists It Appears On:

  • BuzzFeed
  • Canadian Gift Guide
  • Electric Lit
  • Readings
  • The Guardian
  • Today FM

Frances is a cool-headed and darkly observant young woman, vaguely pursuing a career in writing while studying in Dublin. Her best friend and comrade-in-arms is the beautiful and endlessly self-possessed Bobbi. At a local poetry performance one night, Frances and Bobbi catch the eye of Melissa, a well-known photographer, and as the girls are then gradually drawn into Melissa’s world, Frances is reluctantly impressed by the older woman’s sophisticated home and tall, handsome husband, Nick. However amusing and ironic Frances and Nick’s flirtation seems at first, it gives way to a strange intimacy, and Frances’s friendship with Bobbi begins to fracture. As Frances tries to keep her life in check, her relationships increasingly resist her control: with Nick, with her difficult and unhappy father, and finally, terribly, with Bobbi.

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28 .) Eleanor Oliphant is Completely Fine by Gail Honeyman

Lists It Appears On:

  • Bookbub Blog
  • Goodreads
  • King County Library
  • Multnomah County
  • Noted
  • Today FM

“Meet Eleanor Oliphant: She struggles with appropriate social skills and tends to say exactly what she’s thinking. Nothing is missing in her carefully timetabled life of avoiding social interactions, where weekends are punctuated by frozen pizza, vodka, and phone chats with Mummy.

But everything changes when Eleanor meets Raymond, the bumbling and deeply unhygienic IT guy from her office. When she and Raymond together save Sammy, an elderly gentleman who has fallen on the sidewalk, the three become the kinds of friends who rescue one another from the lives of isolation they have each been living. And it is Raymond’s big heart that will ultimately help Eleanor find the way to repair her own profoundly damaged one.”

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27 .) Fever Dream by Samanta Schweblin, translated from the Spanish by Megan McDowell

Lists It Appears On:

  • Boston Globe
  • Electric Lit
  • Large Hearted Boy
  • MPR News
  • The Economist
  • The Guardian

“A young woman named Amanda lies dying in a rural hospital clinic. A boy named David sits beside her. She’s not his mother. He’s not her child. Together, they tell a haunting story of broken souls, toxins, and the power and desperation of family.

Fever Dream is a nightmare come to life, a ghost story for the real world, a love story and a cautionary tale. One of the freshest new voices to come out of the Spanish language and translated into English for the first time, Samanta Schweblin creates an aura of strange psychological menace and otherworldly reality in this absorbing, unsettling, taut novel.”

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26 .) Future Home of the Living God by Louise Erdrich

Lists It Appears On:

  • Barnes & Noble
  • BuzzFeed
  • MPR News
  • Multnomah County
  • Southern Living
  • The New York Times

“The world as we know it is ending. Evolution has reversed itself, affecting every living creature on earth. Science cannot stop the world from running backwards, as woman after woman gives birth to infants that appear to be primitive species of humans. Twenty-six-year-old Cedar Hawk Songmaker, adopted daughter of a pair of big-hearted, open-minded Minneapolis liberals, is as disturbed and uncertain as the rest of America around her. But for Cedar, this change is profound and deeply personal. She is four months pregnant.

Though she wants to tell the adoptive parents who raised her from infancy, Cedar first feels compelled to find her birth mother, Mary Potts, an Ojibwe living on the reservation, to understand both her and her baby’s origins. As Cedar goes back to her own biological beginnings, society around her begins to disintegrate, fueled by a swelling panic about the end of humanity.

There are rumors of martial law, of Congress confining pregnant women. Of a registry, and rewards for those who turn these wanted women in. Flickering through the chaos are signs of increasing repression: a shaken Cedar witnesses a family wrenched apart when police violently drag a mother from her husband and child in a parking lot. The streets of her neighborhood have been renamed with Bible verses. A stranger answers the phone when she calls her adoptive parents, who have vanished without a trace. It will take all Cedar has to avoid the prying eyes of potential informants and keep her baby safe.”

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25 .) Ill Will by Dan Chaon

Lists It Appears On:

  • LA Times
  • MPR News
  • Paste
  • Publishers Weekly
  • The New York Times
  • The Washington Post

“A psychologist in suburban Cleveland, Dustin is drifting through his forties when he hears the news: His adopted brother, Rusty, is being released from prison. Thirty years ago, Rusty received a life sentence for the massacre of Dustin’s parents, aunt, and uncle. The trial came to epitomize the 1980s hysteria over Satanic cults; despite the lack of physical evidence, the jury believed the outlandish accusations Dustin and his cousin made against Rusty. Now, after DNA analysis has overturned the conviction, Dustin braces for a reckoning.

Meanwhile, one of Dustin’s patients has been plying him with stories of the drowning deaths of a string of drunk college boys. At first Dustin dismisses his patient’s suggestions that a serial killer is at work as paranoid thinking, but as the two embark on an amateur investigation, Dustin starts to believe that there’s more to the deaths than coincidence. Soon he becomes obsessed, crossing all professional boundaries—and putting his own family in harm’s way.”

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24 .) Marlena by Julie Buntin

Lists It Appears On:

  • BuzzFeed
  • Electric Lit
  • Huffington post
  • Michael Magras
  • Publishers Weekly
  • The Washington Post

“The story of two girls and the wild year that will cost one her life, and define the other’s for decades

Everything about fifteen-year-old Cat’s new town in rural Michigan is lonely and off-kilter until she meets her neighbor, the manic, beautiful, pill-popping Marlena. Cat is quickly drawn into Marlena’s orbit and as she catalogues a litany of firsts―first drink, first cigarette, first kiss, first pill―Marlena’s habits harden and calcify. Within the year, Marlena is dead, drowned in six inches of icy water in the woods nearby. Now, decades later, when a ghost from that pivotal year surfaces unexpectedly, Cat must try again to move on, even as the memory of Marlena calls her back.”

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23 .) New People by Danzy Senna

Lists It Appears On:

  • BuzzFeed
  • Entropy
  • Michael Magras
  • The New York Times
  • Time
  • Turnaround

As the twentieth century draws to a close, Maria is at the start of a life she never thought possible. She and Khalil, her college sweetheart, are planning their wedding. They are the perfect couple, “King and Queen of the Racially Nebulous Prom.” Their skin is the same shade of beige. They live together in a black bohemian enclave in Brooklyn, where Khalil is riding the wave of the first dot-com boom and Maria is plugging away at her dissertation, on the Jonestown massacre. They’ve even landed a starring role in a documentary about “new people” like them, who are blurring the old boundaries as a brave new era dawns. Everything Maria knows she should want lies before her–yet she can’t stop daydreaming about another man, a poet she barely knows. As fantasy escalates to fixation, it dredges up secrets from the past and threatens to unravel not only Maria’s perfect new life but her very persona.

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22 .) What We Lose by Zinzi Clemmons

Lists It Appears On:

  • Bustle
  • Electric Lit
  • Huffington post
  • Notes In The Margin
  • Paste
  • Southern Living

“Raised in Pennsylvania, Thandi views the world of her mother’s childhood in Johannesburg as both impossibly distant and ever present. She is an outsider wherever she goes, caught between being black and white, American and not. She tries to connect these dislocated pieces of her life, and as her mother succumbs to cancer, Thandi searches for an anchor—someone, or something, to love.

In arresting and unsettling prose, we watch Thandi’s life unfold, from losing her mother and learning to live without the person who has most profoundly shaped her existence, to her own encounters with romance and unexpected motherhood. Through exquisite and emotional vignettes, Clemmons creates a stunning portrayal of what it means to choose to live, after loss. An elegiac distillation, at once intellectual and visceral, of a young woman’s understanding of absence and identity that spans continents and decades, What We Lose heralds the arrival of a virtuosic new voice in fiction.”

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21 .) Stay With Me by Ayobami Adebayo

Lists It Appears On:

  • BuzzFeed
  • Chicago Tribune
  • Island Books
  • Shelf Awareness
  • Southern Living
  • The Economist
  • The New York Times

Yejide and Akin have been married since they met and fell in love at university. Though many expected Akin to take several wives, he and Yejide have always agreed: polygamy is not for them. But four years into their marriage–after consulting fertility doctors and healers, trying strange teas and unlikely cures–Yejide is still not pregnant. She assumes she still has time–until her family arrives on her doorstep with a young woman they introduce as Akin’s second wife. Furious, shocked, and livid with jealousy, Yejide knows the only way to save her marriage is to get pregnant. Which, finally, she does–but at a cost far greater than she could have dared to imagine. An electrifying novel of enormous emotional power, Stay With Me asks how much we can sacrifice for the sake of family.

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20 .) The Changeling by Victor LaValle

Lists It Appears On:

  • Amber Sparks
  • Electric Lit
  • Entropy
  • Hudson Booksellers
  • The New York Times
  • Time
  • Vol.1 Brooklyn

“When Apollo Kagwa’s father disappeared, all he left his son were strange recurring dreams and a box of books stamped with the word IMPROBABILIA. Now Apollo is a father himself—and as he and his wife, Emma, are settling into their new lives as parents, exhaustion and anxiety start to take their toll. Apollo’s old dreams return and Emma begins acting odd. Irritable and disconnected from their new baby boy, at first Emma seems to be exhibiting signs of postpartum depression, but it quickly becomes clear that her troubles go even deeper. Before Apollo can do anything to help, Emma commits a horrific act—beyond any parent’s comprehension—and vanishes, seemingly into thin air.

Thus begins Apollo’s odyssey through a world he only thought he understood, to find a wife and child who are nothing like he’d imagined. His quest, which begins when he meets a mysterious stranger who claims to have information about Emma’s whereabouts, takes him to a forgotten island, a graveyard full of secrets, a forest where immigrant legends still live, and finally back to a place he thought he had lost forever.”

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19 .) The Ninth Hour by Alice McDermott

Lists It Appears On:

  • Barnes & Noble
  • King County Library
  • Kirkus
  • Michael Magras
  • The New York Times
  • The Washington Post
  • Time

“On a dim winter afternoon, a young Irish immigrant opens the gas taps in his Brooklyn tenement. He is determined to prove―to the subway bosses who have recently fired him, to his badgering, pregnant wife―“that the hours of his life belong to himself alone.” In the aftermath of the fire that follows, Sister St. Savior, an aging nun appears, unbidden, to direct the way forward for his widow and his unborn child.

We begin deep inside Catholic Brooklyn, in the early part of the twentieth century. Decorum, superstition, and shame collude to erase the man’s brief existence. Yet his suicide, although never spoken of, reverberates through many lives and over the decades testing the limits and the demands of love and sacrifice, of forgiveness and forgetfulness, even through multiple generations.

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18 .) Anything Is Possible by Elizabeth Strout

Lists It Appears On:

  • Goodreads
  • King County Library
  • Multnomah County
  • Noted
  • Publishers Weekly
  • Readings
  • The New York Times
  • The Washington Post

“Recalling Olive Kitteridge in its richness, structure, and complexity, Anything Is Possible explores the whole range of human emotion through the intimate dramas of people struggling to understand themselves and others.

Here are two sisters: One trades self-respect for a wealthy husband while the other finds in the pages of a book a kindred spirit who changes her life. The janitor at the local school has his faith tested in an encounter with an isolated man he has come to help; a grown daughter longs for mother love even as she comes to accept her mother’s happiness in a foreign country; and the adult Lucy Barton (the heroine of My Name Is Lucy Barton, the author’s celebrated New York Times bestseller) returns to visit her siblings after seventeen years of absence.

Reverberating with the deep bonds of family, and the hope that comes with reconciliation, Anything Is Possible again underscores Elizabeth Strout’s place as one of America’s most respected and cherished authors.”

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17 .) Magpie Murders by Anthony Horowitz

Lists It Appears On:

  • Hudson Booksellers
  • Indigo
  • Island Books
  • King County Library
  • MPR News
  • Sit Tableside
  • The Washington Post
  • theWhat

When editor Susan Ryeland is given the manuscript of Alan Conway’s latest novel, she has no reason to think it will be much different from any of his others. After working with the bestselling crime writer for years, she’s intimately familiar with his detective, Atticus Pünd, who solves mysteries disturbing sleepy English villages. An homage to queens of classic British crime such as Agatha Christie and Dorothy Sayers, Alan’s traditional formula has proved hugely successful. So successful that Susan must continue to put up with his troubling behavior if she wants to keep her job.

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16 .) My Absolute Darling by Gabriel Tallent

Lists It Appears On:

  • Amazon
  • Canadian Gift Guide
  • Multnomah County
  • Noted
  • The Guardian
  • The New York Times
  • The Spinoff
  • The Washington Post
  • theWhat

“Turtle Alveston is a survivor. At fourteen, she roams the woods along the northern California coast. The creeks, tide pools, and rocky islands are her haunts and her hiding grounds, and she is known to wander for miles. But while her physical world is expansive, her personal one is small and treacherous: Turtle has grown up isolated since the death of her mother, in the thrall of her tortured and charismatic father, Martin. Her social existence is confined to the middle school (where she fends off the interest of anyone, student or teacher, who might penetrate her shell) and to her life with her father.

Then Turtle meets Jacob, a high-school boy who tells jokes, lives in a big clean house, and looks at Turtle as if she is the sunrise. And for the first time, the larger world begins to come into focus: her life with Martin is neither safe nor sustainable. Motivated by her first experience with real friendship and a teenage crush, Turtle starts to imagine escape, using the very survival skills her father devoted himself to teaching her. What follows is a harrowing story of bravery and redemption. With Turtle’s escalating acts of physical and emotional courage, the reader watches, heart in throat, as this teenage girl struggles to become her own hero—and in the process, becomes ours as well.

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15 .) What It Means When a Man Falls From the Sky by Lesley Nneka Arimah

Lists It Appears On:

  • Book Riot
  • BuzzFeed
  • Kirkus
  • Michael Magras
  • MPR News
  • Publishers Weekly
  • Shelf Awareness
  • Southern Living
  • Thrillist

In “Who Will Greet You at Home,” a National Magazine Award finalist for The New Yorker, A woman desperate for a child weaves one out of hair, with unsettling results. In “Wild,” a disastrous night out shifts a teenager and her Nigerian cousin onto uneasy common ground. In “The Future Looks Good,” three generations of women are haunted by the ghosts of war, while in “Light,” a father struggles to protect and empower the daughter he loves. And in the title story, in a world ravaged by flood and riven by class, experts have discovered how to “fix the equation of a person” – with rippling, unforeseen repercussions.

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14 .) American War by Omar El Akkad

Lists It Appears On:

  • Bookbub Blog
  • Hudson Booksellers
  • King County Library
  • MPR News
  • Multnomah County
  • Noted
  • Paste
  • The Globe
  • The New York Times
  • The Washington Post

“An audacious and powerful debut novel: a second American Civil War, a devastating plague, and one family caught deep in the middle—a story that asks what might happen if America were to turn its most devastating policies and deadly weapons upon itself.

Sarat Chestnut, born in Louisiana, is only six when the Second American Civil War breaks out in 2074. But even she knows that oil is outlawed, that Louisiana is half underwater, and that unmanned drones fill the sky. When her father is killed and her family is forced into Camp Patience for displaced persons, she begins to grow up shaped by her particular time and place. But not everyone at Camp Patience is who they claim to be. Eventually Sarat is befriended by a mysterious functionary, under whose influence she is turned into a deadly instrument of war. The decisions that she makes will have tremendous consequences not just for Sarat but for her family and her country, rippling through generations of strangers and kin alike.”

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13 .) Home Fire by Kamila Shamsie

Lists It Appears On:

  • Boston Globe
  • Entropy
  • Financial Times
  • Independent
  • LA Times
  • Noted
  • Paste
  • Southern Living
  • The New York Times
  • The Washington Post

“Isma is free. After years of watching out for her younger siblings in the wake of their mother’s death, she’s accepted an invitation from a mentor in America that allows her to resume a dream long deferred. But she can’t stop worrying about Aneeka, her beautiful, headstrong sister back in London, or their brother, Parvaiz, who’s disappeared in pursuit of his own dream, to prove himself to the dark legacy of the jihadist father he never knew. When he resurfaces half a globe away, Isma’s worst fears are confirmed.

Then Eamonn enters the sisters’ lives. Son of a powerful political figure, he has his own birthright to live up to—or defy. Is he to be a chance at love? The means of Parvaiz’s salvation? Suddenly, two families’ fates are inextricably, devastatingly entwined, in this searing novel that asks: What sacrifices will we make in the name of love?”

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12 .) The Ministry of Utmost Happiness by Arundhati Roy

Lists It Appears On:

  • Amazon
  • Boston Globe
  • Bustle
  • Financial Times
  • Hudson Booksellers
  • King County Library
  • The Globe
  • The Guardian
  • The Washington Post
  • Thrillist

“The Ministry of Utmost Happiness takes us on an intimate journey of many years across the Indian subcontinent—from the cramped neighborhoods of Old Delhi and the roads of the new city to the mountains and valleys of Kashmir and beyond, where war is peace and peace is war.

It is an aching love story and a decisive remonstration, a story told in a whisper, in a shout, through unsentimental tears and sometimes with a bitter laugh. Each of its characters is indelibly, tenderly rendered. Its heroes are people who have been broken by the world they live in and then rescued, patched together by acts of love—and by hope.

The tale begins with Anjum—who used to be Aftab—unrolling a threadbare Persian carpet in a city graveyard she calls home. We encounter the odd, unforgettable Tilo and the men who loved her—including Musa, sweetheart and ex-sweetheart, lover and ex-lover; their fates are as entwined as their arms used to be and always will be. We meet Tilo’s landlord, a former suitor, now an intelligence officer posted to Kabul. And then we meet the two Miss Jebeens: the first a child born in Srinagar and buried in its overcrowded Martyrs’ Graveyard; the second found at midnight, abandoned on a concrete sidewalk in the heart of New Delhi.”

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11 .) The Power by Naomi Alderman

Lists It Appears On:

  • Bookbub Blog
  • Boston Globe
  • Bustle
  • Fictional Flowerday
  • LA Times
  • MPR News
  • Paste
  • Readings
  • The New York Times
  • The Spinoff

“In THE POWER, the world is a recognizable place: there’s a rich Nigerian boy who lounges around the family pool; a foster kid whose religious parents hide their true nature; an ambitious American politician; a tough London girl from a tricky family. But then a vital new force takes root and flourishes, causing their lives to converge with devastating effect. Teenage girls now have immense physical power–they can cause agonizing pain and even death. And, with this small twist of nature, the world drastically resets.

From award-winning author Naomi Alderman, THE POWER is speculative fiction at its most ambitious and provocative, at once taking us on a thrilling journey to an alternate reality, and exposing our own world in bold and surprising ways.”

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10 .) Borne by Jeff VanderMeer

Lists It Appears On:

  • Bookbub Blog
  • Boston Globe
  • Chicago Review Of Books
  • Huffington post
  • King County Library
  • LA Times
  • MPR News
  • Multnomah County
  • Paste
  • Publishers Weekly
  • Thrillist

“In Borne, a young woman named Rachel survives as a scavenger in a ruined city half destroyed by drought and conflict. The city is dangerous, littered with discarded experiments from the Company―a biotech firm now derelict―and punished by the unpredictable predations of a giant bear. Rachel ekes out an existence in the shelter of a run-down sanctuary she shares with her partner, Wick, who deals his own homegrown psychoactive biotech.

One day, Rachel finds Borne during a scavenging mission and takes him home. Borne as salvage is little more than a green lump―plant or animal?―but exudes a strange charisma. Borne reminds Rachel of the marine life from the island nation of her birth, now lost to rising seas. There is an attachment she resents: in this world any weakness can kill you. Yet, against her instincts―and definitely against Wick’s wishes―Rachel keeps Borne. She cannot help herself. Borne, learning to speak, learning about the world, is fun to be with, and in a world so broken that innocence is a precious thing. For Borne makes Rachel see beauty in the desolation around her. She begins to feel a protectiveness she can ill afford.”

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9 .) White Tears by Hari Kunzru

Lists It Appears On:

  • Electric Lit
  • Huffington post
  • Kirkus
  • Publishers Weekly
  • Shelf Awareness
  • The Economist
  • The New York Times
  • The Spinoff
  • The Washington Post
  • Time
  • Vol.1 Brooklyn

Two twenty-something New Yorkers. Seth is awkward and shy. Carter is the glamorous heir to one of America’s great fortunes. They have one thing in common: an obsession with music. Seth is desperate to reach for the future. Carter is slipping back into the past. When Seth accidentally records an unknown singer in a park, Carter sends it out over the Internet, claiming it’s a long lost 1920s blues recording by a musician called Charlie Shaw. When an old collector contacts them to say that their fake record and their fake bluesman are actually real, the two young white men, accompanied by Carter’s troubled sister Leonie, spiral down into the heart of the nation’s darkness, encountering a suppressed history of greed, envy, revenge, and exploitation.

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8 .) The Leavers by Lisa Ko

Lists It Appears On:

  • Bookbub Blog
  • Bustle
  • BuzzFeed
  • Electric Lit
  • Entropy
  • Huffington post
  • King County Library
  • LA Times
  • Large Hearted Boy
  • Paste
  • Sit Tableside
  • theWhat

“One morning, Deming Guo’s mother, Polly, an undocumented Chinese immigrant, goes to her job at a nail salon—and never comes home. No one can find any trace of her.
With his mother gone, eleven-year-old Deming is left mystified and bereft. Eventually adopted by a pair of well-meaning white professors, Deming is moved from the Bronx to a small town upstate and renamed Daniel Wilkinson. But far from all he’s ever known, Daniel struggles to reconcile his adoptive parents’ desire that he assimilate with his memories of his mother and the community he left behind.
Told from the perspective of both Daniel—as he grows into a directionless young man—and Polly, Ko’s novel gives us one of fiction’s most singular mothers. Loving and selfish, determined and frightened, Polly is forced to make one heartwrenching choice after another.
Set in New York and China, The Leavers is a vivid examination of borders and belonging. It’s a moving story of how a boy comes into his own when everything he loves is taken away, and how a mother learns to live with the mistakes of the past. “

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7 .) Her Body and Other Parties by Carmen Maria Machado

Lists It Appears On:

  • Amber Sparks
  • Book Riot
  • Boston Globe
  • Bustle
  • BuzzFeed
  • Chicago Review Of Books
  • Chicago Tribune
  • Entropy
  • Huffington post
  • Kirkus
  • LA Times
  • MPR News
  • Publishers Weekly
  • The Washington Post
  • Vol.1 Brooklyn

“In Her Body and Other Parties, Carmen Maria Machado blithely demolishes the arbitrary borders between psychological realism and science fiction, comedy and horror, fantasy and fabulism. While her work has earned her comparisons to Karen Russell and Kelly Link, she has a voice that is all her own. In this electric and provocative debut, Machado bends genre to shape startling narratives that map the realities of women’s lives and the violence visited upon their bodies.

A wife refuses her husband’s entreaties to remove the green ribbon from around her neck. A woman recounts her sexual encounters as a plague slowly consumes humanity. A salesclerk in a mall makes a horrifying discovery within the seams of the store’s prom dresses. One woman’s surgery-induced weight loss results in an unwanted houseguest. And in the bravura novella “Especially Heinous,” Machado reimagines every episode of Law & Order: Special Victims Unit, a show we naïvely assumed had shown it all, generating a phantasmagoric police procedural full of doppelgängers, ghosts, and girls with bells for eyes.

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6 .) Pachinko by Min Jee Lee

Lists It Appears On:

  • Amazon
  • Book Riot
  • Bookbub Blog
  • Boston Globe
  • Bustle
  • BuzzFeed
  • Chicago Review Of Books
  • Electric Lit
  • Entropy
  • MPR News
  • Noted
  • Paste
  • Publishers Weekly
  • Readings
  • Southern Living
  • The New York Times
  • theWhat

“In the early 1900s, teenaged Sunja, the adored daughter of a crippled fisherman, falls for a wealthy stranger at the seashore near her home in Korea. He promises her the world, but when she discovers she is pregnant–and that her lover is married–she refuses to be bought. Instead, she accepts an offer of marriage from a gentle, sickly minister passing through on his way to Japan. But her decision to abandon her home, and to reject her son’s powerful father, sets off a dramatic saga that will echo down through the generations.

Richly told and profoundly moving, Pachinko is a story of love, sacrifice, ambition, and loyalty. From bustling street markets to the halls of Japan’s finest universities to the pachinko parlors of the criminal underworld, Lee’s complex and passionate characters–strong, stubborn women, devoted sisters and sons, fathers shaken by moral crisis–survive and thrive against the indifferent arc of history.”

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5 .) Manhattan Beach by Jennifer Egan

Lists It Appears On:

  • Amazon
  • Barnes & Noble
  • Bustle
  • Canadian Gift Guide
  • Dallas News
  • Financial Times
  • Hudson Booksellers
  • Indigo
  • King County Library
  • Kirkus
  • Noted
  • Readings
  • Southern Living
  • The Globe
  • The Guardian
  • The New York Times
  • The Washington Post
  • Time

“Anna Kerrigan, nearly twelve years old, accompanies her father to visit Dexter Styles, a man who, she gleans, is crucial to the survival of her father and her family. She is mesmerized by the sea beyond the house and by some charged mystery between the two men.

Years later, her father has disappeared and the country is at war. Anna works at the Brooklyn Naval Yard, where women are allowed to hold jobs that once belonged to men, now soldiers abroad. She becomes the first female diver, the most dangerous and exclusive of occupations, repairing the ships that will help America win the war. One evening at a nightclub, she meets Dexter Styles again, and begins to understand the complexity of her father’s life, the reasons he might have vanished.”

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4 .) Little Fires Everywhere by Celeste Ng

Lists It Appears On:

  • Amazon
  • Amber Sparks
  • Barnes & Noble
  • Book Riot
  • Bookbub Blog
  • Bustle
  • BuzzFeed
  • Canadian Gift Guide
  • Electric Lit
  • Entropy
  • Fictional Flowerday
  • Goodreads
  • Huffington post
  • Island Books
  • King County Library
  • Large Hearted Boy
  • MPR News
  • Multnomah County
  • Notes In The Margin
  • Paste
  • Southern Living
  • The Washington Post
  • theWhat

“In Shaker Heights, a placid, progressive suburb of Cleveland, everything is planned – from the layout of the winding roads, to the colors of the houses, to the successful lives its residents will go on to lead. And no one embodies this spirit more than Elena Richardson, whose guiding principle is playing by the rules.

Enter Mia Warren – an enigmatic artist and single mother – who arrives in this idyllic bubble with her teenaged daughter Pearl, and rents a house from the Richardsons. Soon Mia and Pearl become more than tenants: all four Richardson children are drawn to the mother-daughter pair. But Mia carries with her a mysterious past and a disregard for the status quo that threatens to upend this carefully ordered community.

When old family friends of the Richardsons attempt to adopt a Chinese-American baby, a custody battle erupts that dramatically divides the town–and puts Mia and Elena on opposing sides. Suspicious of Mia and her motives, Elena is determined to uncover the secrets in Mia’s past. But her obsession will come at unexpected and devastating costs. “

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3 .) Exit West by Mohsin Hamid

Lists It Appears On:

  • Amazon
  • Barnes & Noble
  • Book Riot
  • Boston Globe
  • Bustle
  • BuzzFeed
  • Chicago Review Of Books
  • Electric Lit
  • Entropy
  • Goodreads
  • Island Books
  • King County Library
  • Kirkus
  • LA Times
  • MPR News
  • Multnomah County
  • Paste
  • Shelf Awareness
  • Sit Tableside
  • Southern Living
  • The Economist
  • The Globe
  • The New York Times
  • The Portable Infinite
  • The Washington Post
  • Time
  • Vol.1 Brooklyn

In a country teetering on the brink of civil war, two young people meet—sensual, fiercely independent Nadia and gentle, restrained Saeed. They embark on a furtive love affair, and are soon cloistered in a premature intimacy by the unrest roiling their city. When it explodes, turning familiar streets into a patchwork of checkpoints and bomb blasts, they begin to hear whispers about doors—doors that can whisk people far away, if perilously and for a price. As the violence escalates, Nadia and Saeed decide that they no longer have a choice. Leaving their homeland and their old lives behind, they find a door and step through. . . .

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2 .) Sing, Unburied, Sing by Jesmyn Ward

Lists It Appears On:

  • Amazon
  • Amber Sparks
  • Barnes & Noble
  • Book Riot
  • Boston Globe
  • Bustle
  • BuzzFeed
  • Canadian Gift Guide
  • Dallas News
  • Electric Lit
  • Entropy
  • Financial Times
  • Goodreads
  • Hudson Booksellers
  • Huffington post
  • Island Books
  • King County Library
  • Kirkus
  • LA Times
  • Michael Magras
  • MPR News
  • Multnomah County
  • Noted
  • Paste
  • Publishers Weekly
  • Southern Living
  • The New York Times
  • theWhat
  • Time

“In Jesmyn Ward’s first novel since her National Book Award–winning Salvage the Bones, this singular American writer brings the archetypal road novel into rural twenty-first-century America. An intimate portrait of a family and an epic tale of hope and struggle, Sing, Unburied, Sing journeys through Mississippi’s past and present, examining the ugly truths at the heart of the American story and the power—and limitations—of family bonds.

Jojo is thirteen years old and trying to understand what it means to be a man. He doesn’t lack in fathers to study, chief among them his Black grandfather, Pop. But there are other men who complicate his understanding: his absent White father, Michael, who is being released from prison; his absent White grandfather, Big Joseph, who won’t acknowledge his existence; and the memories of his dead uncle, Given, who died as a teenager.

His mother, Leonie, is an inconsistent presence in his and his toddler sister’s lives. She is an imperfect mother in constant conflict with herself and those around her. She is Black and her children’s father is White. She wants to be a better mother but can’t put her children above her own needs, especially her drug use. Simultaneously tormented and comforted by visions of her dead brother, which only come to her when she’s high, Leonie is embattled in ways that reflect the brutal reality of her circumstances.”

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1 .) Lincoln in the Bardo by George Saunders

Lists It Appears On:

  • Amazon
  • Amber Sparks
  • Barnes & Noble
  • Book Riot
  • Boston Globe
  • Bustle
  • BuzzFeed
  • Chicago Tribune
  • Electric Lit
  • Entropy
  • Financial Times
  • Hudson Booksellers
  • Independent
  • Island Books
  • King County Library
  • LA Times
  • Michael Magras
  • MPR News
  • Multnomah County
  • Noted
  • Paste
  • Sit Tableside
  • Southern Living
  • The Economist
  • The Globe
  • The Guardian
  • The New York Times
  • The Portable Infinite
  • The Spinoff
  • Time

“February 1862. The Civil War is less than one year old. The fighting has begun in earnest, and the nation has begun to realize it is in for a long, bloody struggle. Meanwhile, President Lincoln’s beloved eleven-year-old son, Willie, lies upstairs in the White House, gravely ill. In a matter of days, despite predictions of a recovery, Willie dies and is laid to rest in a Georgetown cemetery. “My poor boy, he was too good for this earth,” the president says at the time. “God has called him home.” Newspapers report that a grief-stricken Lincoln returns, alone, to the crypt several times to hold his boy’s body.

From that seed of historical truth, George Saunders spins an unforgettable story of familial love and loss that breaks free of its realistic, historical framework into a supernatural realm both hilarious and terrifying. Willie Lincoln finds himself in a strange purgatory where ghosts mingle, gripe, commiserate, quarrel, and enact bizarre acts of penance. Within this transitional state—called, in the Tibetan tradition, the bardo—a monumental struggle erupts over young Willie’s soul.”

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The 500+ Additional Best Fiction Books Of 2017



 

# Books Author Lists
(Titles Appear On 4 Lists Each)
50 A Legacy of Spies John le Carré Barnes & Noble
Indigo
LA Times
The Spinoff
52 A Separation Katie Kitamura Electric Lit
Huffington post
MPR News
The New York Times
53 Five-Carat Soul James McBride BuzzFeed
Southern Living
The New York Times
The Washington Post
54 Forest Dark Nicole Krauss Financial Times
Publishers Weekly
The Globe
The New York Times
55 History of Wolves Emily Fridlund Hudson Booksellers
MPR News
The New York Times
theWhat
56 House of Names Colm Toibin Boston Globe
The Guardian
The Washington Post
Today FM
57 Idaho Emily Ruskovich BuzzFeed
King County Library
Noted
The Spinoff
58 Made for Love Alissa Nutting Electric Lit
Entropy
Huffington post
Multnomah County
59 Men Without Women Haruki Murakami Noted
The Washington Post
theWhat
Thrillist
60 Mrs Osmond John Banville Financial Times
Noted
The Guardian
The New York Times
61 Reservoir 13 Jon McGregor Financial Times
Independent
Publishers Weekly
The Guardian
62 So Much Blue Percival Everett LA Times
Michael Magras
Shelf Awareness
The Seattle Times
63 Sourdough Robin Sloan Amazon
Barnes & Noble
Fictional Flowerday
Southern Living
64 Standard Deviation Katherine Heiny Amazon
MPR News
The Washington Post
theWhat
65 The Bear and the Nightingale Katherine Arden Bookbub Blog
Island Books
Multnomah County
Shelf Awareness
66 The Grip Of It Jac Jemc Amber Sparks
Chicago Review Of Books
Entropy
Vol.1 Brooklyn
67 The Heart’s Invisible Furies John Boyne Today FM
Amazon
Chicago Review Of Books
Fictional Flowerday
68 The Locals Jonathan Dee Publishers Weekly
The Seattle Times
The Washington Post
theWhat
69 The Sparsholt Affair Alan Hollinghurst Financial Times
Independent
Noted
The Guardian
70 The Stone Sky N.K. Jemisin Bustle
Multnomah County
Paste
The New York Times
(Titles Appear On 3 Lists Each)
71 A Horse Walks into a Bar David Grossman. Translated from the Hebrew by Jessica Cohen Shelf Awareness
The New York Times
The Washington Post
72 A Kind of Freedom Margaret Wilkerson Sexton Multnomah County
Southern Living
The New York Times
73 Artemis Andy Weir Barnes & Noble
Bookbub Blog
Canadian Gift Guide
74 Broken River J. Robert Lennon Electric Lit
MPR News
Noted
75 Days Without End Sebastian Barry Multnomah County
theWhat
Time
76 Difficult Women Roxane Gay Amber Sparks
Chicago Review Of Books
King County Library
77 Fresh Complaint Jeffrey Eugenides The New York Times
theWhat
Today FM
78 Frontier Can Xue, translated from the Chinese by Karen Gernant and Chen Zeping Amber Sparks
Boston Globe
Entropy
79 Human Acts Han Kang Huffington post
Noted
Vol.1 Brooklyn
80 Less Andrew Sean Greer Bookbub Blog
Southern Living
The New York Times
81 Motherest Kristen Iskandrian Amber Sparks
Entropy
Publishers Weekly
82 Mrs. Fletcher Tom Perrotta King County Library
LA Times
theWhat
83 My Favorite Thing Is Monsters Emil Ferris King County Library
MPR News
Multnomah County
84 Smile Roddy Doyle The Guardian
The Washington Post
Today FM
85 Solar Bones Mike McCormack Island Books
Noted
The Spinoff
86 Son of a Trickster Eden Robinson Canadian Gift Guide
Indigo
The Globe
87 The Burning Girl Claire Messud Boston Globe
Financial Times
LA Times
88 The Dry Jane Harper Bookbub Blog
King County Library
Multnomah County
89 The End of Eddy Édouard Louis, translated from the French by Michael Lucey Boston Globe
The Globe
The Guardian
90 The Lonely Hearts Hotel Heather O’Neill Boston Globe
Indigo
The Globe
91 The Sarah Book Scott McClanahan Amber Sparks
Electric Lit
Vol.1 Brooklyn
92 The Seventh Function of Language Laurent Binet Electric Lit
Publishers Weekly
The Economist
93 This Is How It Always Is Laurie Frankel Amazon
Island Books
King County Library
94 Turtles All the Way Down John Green BuzzFeed
Fictional Flowerday
Today FM
95 Uncommon Type Tom Hanks Barnes & Noble
Bookbub Blog
Today FM
96 Universal Harvester John Darnielle Multnomah County
Paste
The Washington Post
97 Winter Ali Smith Financial Times
Independent
The Guardian
(Titles Appear On 2 Lists Each)
98 A Book of American Martyrs Joyce Carol Oates LA Times
The Washington Post
99 A Column of Fire Ken Follett Barnes & Noble
The Washington Post
100 An Unkindness of Ghosts Solomon Rivers Bustle
Turnaround
101 Attrib. And Other Stories The Guardian
Turnaround
102 Bad Dreams and Other Stories Tessa Hadley Financial Times
The New York Times
103 Beautiful Animals Lawrence Osborne The New York Times
The Washington Post
104 Birdcage Walk Helen Dunmore Noted
The Guardian
105 Chemistry Weike Wang MPR News
The Washington Post
106 Dark at the Crossing Elliot Ackerman MPR News
The Washington Post
107 Don’t Let Go Harlan Coben Barnes & Noble
Bookbub Blog
108 Eat Only When You’re Hungry Lindsay Hunter Amber Sparks
Chicago Review Of Books
109 Elmet Fiona Mozley Financial Times
Thrillist
110 Fierce Kingdom Gin Phillips Bustle
Indigo
111 Final Girls Riley Sager Bookbub Blog
Notes In The Margin
112 Glass Houses Louise Penny Barnes & Noble
Multnomah County
113 H(a)ppy Nicola Barker Independent
The Guardian
114 How To Behave in a Crowd Camille Bordas Chicago Review Of Books
Electric Lit
115 How to Survive A Summer Nick White Multnomah County
Turnaround
116 Iceland Dominic Hoey Noted
The Spinoff
117 Isadora Amelia Gray Amber Sparks
Entropy
118 La Belle Sauvage: Book of Dust Trilogy Philip Pullman The Spinoff
Today FM
119 Large Animals Jess Arndt BuzzFeed
Entropy
120 Lillian Boxfish Takes a Walk Kathleen Rooney Chicago Review Of Books
Multnomah County
121 Long Way Down Jason Reynolds Multnomah County
The Washington Post
122 Madame Zero Sarah Hall The Guardian
Thrillist
123 Midwinter Break Bernard McLaverty The Guardian
Today FM
124 My Not So Perfect Life Sophie Kinsella Goodreads
Multnomah County
125 Origin Dan Brown Barnes & Noble
Canadian Gift Guide
126 Rabbit Cake Annie Hartnett Chicago Review Of Books
MPR News
127 Salt Houses Hala Alyan Bustle
Large Hearted Boy
128 Since We Fell Dennis Lehane Barnes & Noble
King County Library
129 Sleeps Standing: Moetū Witi Ihimaera with Hēmi Kelly Noted
The Spinoff
130 Spoils Brian Van Reet Noted
The Guardian
131 Strange Weather Joe Hill Today FM
Barnes & Noble
132 The Alice Network Kate Quinn King County Library
Multnomah County
133 The Book of Dust Philip Pullman Multnomah County
The Washington Post
134 The Child Finder Rene Denfeld Barnes & Noble
Indigo
135 The City Always Wins Omar Robert Hamilton Boston Globe
Noted
136 The Dark Flood Rises Margaret Drabble The New York Times
The Washington Post
137 The Dinner Party and Other Stories Joshua Ferris The New York Times
The Washington Post
138 The Disintegrations Alistair McCartney Entropy
The Seattle Times
139 The Epiphany Machine David Burr Gerrard Large Hearted Boy
Vol.1 Brooklyn
140 The Floating World C. Morgan Bapst Dallas News
Large Hearted Boy
141 The Golden Legend Nadeem Aslam Paste
The Economist
142 The Good People Hannah Kent Bookbub Blog
Today FM
143 The Hate U Give Angie Thomas Multnomah County
Today FM
144 The Impossible Fortress Jason Rekulak Amazon
Multnomah County
145 The King Is Always Above the People Daniel Alarcón Michael Magras
The Washington Post
146 The Late Show Michael Connelly Barnes & Noble
Multnomah County
147 The Lie of the Land Amanda Craig Financial Times
The Guardian
148 The Marsh King’s Daughter Karen Dionne Multnomah County
Shelf Awareness
149 The Midnight Line Lee Child Barnes & Noble
Today FM
150 The Mountain Paul Yoon Publishers Weekly
Southern Living
151 The Night Ocean Paul La Farge Multnomah County
The Seattle Times
152 The Red Barn Nat Baldwin Amber Sparks
Entropy
153 The Rules of Magic Alice Hoffman Barnes & Noble
Bookbub Blog
154 The Stars Are Fire Anita Shreve Multnomah County
The Washington Post
155 The Twelve Lives of Samuel Hawley Hannah Tinti Paste
The Washington Post
156 The Week Joanna Ruocco Amber Sparks
Entropy
157 The Women in the Castle Jessica Shattuck Barnes & Noble
Multnomah County
158 Things to Do When You’re Goth in the Country Chavisa Woods Multnomah County
Turnaround
159 Things We Lost in the Fire Mariana Enríquez, translated from the Spanish by Megan McDowell Boston Globe
Entropy
160 Wait Till You See Me Dance Deb Olin Unferth Amber Sparks
Entropy
161 We That Are Young The Guardian
Turnaround
162 What the Hell Did I Just Read? David Wong Fictional Flowerday
Multnomah County
163 When I Hit You: Or, A Portrait of the Writer as a Young Wife Meena Kandasamy Financial Times
The Guardian
164 When the English Fall David Williams Chicago Review Of Books
Multnomah County
165 Who Is Rich? Matthew Klam The New York Times
The Washington Post
166 Woman №17 Edan Lepucki The Washington Post
theWhat
167 Young Jane Young Gabrielle Zevin MPR News
The Washington Post
(Titles Appear On 1 Lists Each)
168 2084: The End of the World Turnaround
169 5 Worlds: The Sand Warrior Mark Siegel, et al
Multnomah County
170 A BOY IN WINTER Rachel Seiffert
The New York Times
171 A Boy Named Trout Mercy Strongheart
Multnomah County
172 A Good Day for a Hat T. Nat Fuller
Multnomah County
173 A Life of Adventure and Delight
Huffington post
174 A Long Way From Home Peter Carey Readings
175 A Million Junes Emily Henry
Fictional Flowerday
176 A Piece of the World Christina Baker Kline
Bookbub Blog
177 A Plague of Giants Kevin Hearne
Notes In The Margin
178 A Red Peace (Starfire #1) Spencer Ellsworth
Multnomah County
179 A Small Revolution Jimin Han Entropy
180 A Working Woman Elvira Navarro, trans. from the Spanish by Christina MacSweeney
Publishers Weekly
181 Admission Requirements Phoebe Wang The Globe
182 Affections Rodrigo Hasbún
Large Hearted Boy
183 After the Flare Deji Bryce Olukotun
Chicago Review Of Books
184 Akata Warrior Nnedi Okorafor
Multnomah County
185 Alfie Thyra Heder
Multnomah County
186 All Our Wrong Todays Elan Mastai
Multnomah County
187 All Systems Red: The murderbot diaries Martha Wells
Multnomah County
188 All the Way to Havana Margarita Engle
Multnomah County
189 All’s Faire in Middle School Victoria Jamieson
Multnomah County
190 Always Happy Hour Mary Miller
Amber Sparks
191 Amatka Karin Tidbeck
Multnomah County
192 An Awkward Age Francesca Segal
Financial Times
193 An Occasional History Laura Davenport Entropy
194 Another Castle: Grimoire Andrew Wheeler
Multnomah County
195 Arabella and the battle of Venus David D. Levine.
Multnomah County
196 As a God Might Be Turnaround
197 Assisted Living Gary Lutz Entropy
198 Augustown Kei Miller
Publishers Weekly
199 Austral Paul McAuley
The Economist
200 Autonomous Annalee Newitz
Bookbub Blog
201 Baby Annaleese Jochems Noted
202 Bad Endings Carleigh Baker The Globe
203 Bandette. [Volume three], In the house of the green mask Paul Tobin and Coleen Coover
Multnomah County
204 Beasts of Extraordinary Circumstance Ruth Emmie Lang
Fictional Flowerday
205 Before Everything Victoria Redel Entropy
206 Before We Were Yours Lisa Wingate
Barnes & Noble
207 Belladonna Daša Drndic Thrillist
208 Bellevue Square Michael Redhill The Globe
209 Best Worst American Juan Martinez
Chicago Review Of Books
210 Big Cat, Little Cat Elisha Cooper
Multnomah County
211 Big Lonesome Joseph Scapellato
Amber Sparks
212 Black Marks on the White Page edited Witi Ihimaera and Tina Makereti The Spinoff
213 Black Moses Alain Mabanckou
Vol.1 Brooklyn
214 Blameless Claudio Magris, translated from the Italian by Anne Milano Appel
Boston Globe
215 Blitzed: Drugs in the Third Reich Norman Ohler
Notes In The Margin
216 Boo Who? Ben Clanton
Multnomah County
217 Book of Formation Turnaround
218 Brother David Chariandy The Globe
219 Buckskin Cocaine Erika T. Wurth Entropy
220 By Your Side Kasie West
Multnomah County
221 Careers for Women Joanna Scott
The Seattle Times
222 Castle Cross the Magnet Carter Turnaround
223 Celine Peter Heller MPR News
224 Charlie & Mouse Laurel Snyder
Multnomah County
225 Charlotte the Scientist is Squished Camille Andros
Multnomah County
226 Chasing the King of Hearts Hanna Krall, trans. from the Polish by Philip Boehm
Publishers Weekly
227 Chew: Sour Grapes John Layman, Rob Guillory
Multnomah County
228 CHRISTMAS DAYS: 12 Stories and 12 Feasts for 12 Days Jeanette Winterson
The New York Times
229 Class Francesco Pacifico Paste
230 Cockfosters Helen Simpson
Boston Globe
231 Collected Stories Leonora Carrington
Vol.1 Brooklyn
232 Compass Mathias Enard
The Economist
233 Confessions of a Domestic Failure Bunmi Laditan
Bookbub Blog
234 Crown: An ode to the Fresh Cut Derrick Barnes
Multnomah County
235 Crybaby Lane Laura Ellen Scott
Amber Sparks
236 DANCE OF THE JAKARANDA Peter Kimani
The New York Times
237 Dear Cyborgs Eugene Lim
Vol.1 Brooklyn
238 Decline & Fall on Savage Street Fiona Farrell Noted
239 Deep Freeze John Sandford
Barnes & Noble
240 Demi-Gods Eliza Robertson The Globe
241 Dept. H Volume 1: Murder Six Miles Deep Matt Kindt
Multnomah County
242 Descender. Book four, Orbital mechanics Jeff Lemire and Dustin Nguyen
Multnomah County
243 Devil’s Day Andrew Michael Hurley
Financial Times
244 Diego and the Rangers of the Vastlantic Armand Baltazar
Multnomah County
245 Dinner at the Center of the Earth Nathan Englander LA Times
246 Djinn City Saad Z. Hossain
Chicago Review Of Books
247 Down Below Leonora Carrington Entropy
248 Dragons Love Tacos 2: the Sequel Rubin Adam
Multnomah County
249 Dunbar Edward St. Aubyn
Michael Magras
250 Earthly Remains Donna Leon
Barnes & Noble
251 Eastman Was Here Turnaround
252 Eggshells Caitriona Lally Amazon
253 Eight Ghosts Turnaround
254 Electric Arches
Chicago Tribune
255 Emma in the Night Wendy Walker
Notes In The Margin
256 Empty Set Verónica Gerber Bicecci Entropy
257 End Game David Baldacci
Barnes & Noble
258 Endgame Ahmet Altan. Translated from the Turkish by Alexander Dawe
The Washington Post
259 Enfermario Gabriela Torres Olivares Entropy
260 Enigma Variations André Aciman
The Seattle Times
261 Entropy In Bloom Jeremy Robert Johnson
Multnomah County
262 Erotic Stories for Punjabi Widows Balli Kaur Jaswal
Shelf Awareness
263 Every Last Lie Mary Kubica
Bookbub Blog
264 Everybody’s Son Thrity Umrigar
Multnomah County
265 EXO Fonda Lee
Multnomah County
266 FAST Jorie Graham
The New York Times
267 First Love
The Guardian
268 First Person Richard Flanagan Noted
269 First Rule of Punk Celia C. Perez
Multnomah County
270 Fletcher of the Bounty: A Novel Graeme Lay Noted
271 Flights Olga Tokarczuk
The Guardian
272 Flow: Whanganui River Poems Airini Beautrais The Spinoff
273 Flying Machines: How the Wright Brothers Soared Alison Wilgus
Multnomah County
274 For Isabel: A Mandala Antonio Tabucchi, trans. from the Italian by Elizabeth Harris
Publishers Weekly
275 Fugue States Pasha Malla The Globe
276 Genevieves Henry Hoke Entropy
277 Genuine Fraud E. Lockhart
Multnomah County
278 Ghachar Ghochar Vivek Shanbhag, trans. from the Kannada by Srinath Perur
Publishers Weekly
279 Gifted John Daniel
Multnomah County
280 Ginny Moon: A Novel Benjamin Ludwig Amazon
281 GIVING GODHEAD Dylan Krieger
The New York Times
282 Glory Days Melissa Fraterrigo
Chicago Review Of Books
283 Go, Went, Gone Jenny Erpenbeck, translated from the German by Susan Bernofsky
Boston Globe
284 Golden Hill : A Novel of Old New York Francis Spufford
The Washington Post
285 Goldfish Ghost Lemony Snicket
Multnomah County
286 Grace Paul Lynch
Southern Living
287 Grandma’s Tiny House: A Counting Story JaNay Brown-Wood
Multnomah County
288 Gravity Well Melanie Joosten Readings
289 Grief Cottage Gail Godwin
Publishers Weekly
290 Hardcore Twenty-Four Janet Evanovich
Barnes & Noble
291 Harmless Like You Rowan Hisayo Buchanan
Large Hearted Boy
292 Heather, the Totality Matthew Weiner
Barnes & Noble
293 Heaven’s Crooked Finger Hank Early
Multnomah County
294 Hell and High Water Tanya Landman
Multnomah County
295 Heloise Mandy Hager Noted
296 Hiddensee: A Tale of the Once and Future Nutcracker Gregory Maguire
Barnes & Noble
297 Himself theWhat
298 Holiday Spice Samantha Chase
Multnomah County
299 Homegoing Yaa Gyasi
Financial Times
300 House. Tree. Person. Catriona McPherson
Chicago Review Of Books
301 Houses of Ravicka Renee Gladman Entropy
302 How To Be A Hero Florence Parry Heide
Multnomah County
303 Hunger: A Memoir of (My) Body Roxane Gay
Notes In The Margin
304 I Am Bat Morag Hood
Multnomah County
305 I Am Not Your Perfect Mexican Daughter Erika L. Sanchez
Chicago Review Of Books
306 I Am the Brother of XX Fleur Jaeggy, trans. from the Italian by Gini Alhadeff
Publishers Weekly
307 I Remember Nightfall Marosa di Giorgio, collection translated by Jeannine Marie Pitas
Amber Sparks
308 I’m Fine, But You Appear to Be Sinking Leyna Krow
Huffington post
309 Ice Anna Kavan Entropy
310 If My Moon Was your Sun Andreas Steinhöfel
Multnomah County
311 Improvement Joan Silber
The Washington Post
312 In the Cage Kevin Hardcastle The Globe
313 In the Distance Hernán Díaz
Publishers Weekly
314 In the Midst of Winter Isabel Allende
Barnes & Noble
315 In your Hands Weatherford, Carole Boston
Multnomah County
316 Infinite Ground MacInnes, Martin
Multnomah County
317 Inheritance From Mother Minae Mizumura. Translated from the Japanese by Juliet Winters Carpenter
The Washington Post
318 Insignificant Events in the Life of a Cactus Dusti Bowling
Multnomah County
319 IQ Joe Ide theWhat
320 Is God Is Aleshea Harris Entropy
321 Jabari Jumps Gaia Cornwall
Multnomah County
322 Jane, Unlimited Kristin Cashore
Multnomah County
323 Jean Harley was Here Heather Taylor Johnson Readings
324 Johnson Dean Parker Noted
325 Ka John Crowley LA Times
326 Kaijumax Season Two, The Seamy Underbelly Cannon, Zander
Multnomah County
327 Kintu Jennifer Nansubuga Makumbi
Publishers Weekly
328 Last Gentleman Standing Jane Ashford
Multnomah County
329 Leap of Faith Jenny Pattrick Noted
330 Lifting Damien Wilkins Noted
331 Lightswitches Are My Kryptonite Turnaround
332 Little Red Cat Who Ran Away and Learned His ABCS (the hard way) Patrick McDonnell
Multnomah County
333 Little Sister Barbara Gowdy The Globe
334 Long Black Veil Jennifer Finney Boylan
Multnomah County
335 Lost in September Kathleen Winter The Globe
336 Love & Fame Susie Boyt
Financial Times
337 Lucia the Luchadora Cynthia Leonor Garza,
Multnomah County
338 Lucky Boy Turnaround
339 Lucky Supreme Jeff Johnson theWhat
340 Man Overboard J.A. Jance
Multnomah County
341 Man’s Wars & Wickedness Amanda Ackerman & Harold Abramowitz Entropy
342 Mask of Shadows Linsey Miller
Multnomah County
343 Me Tall, You Small Lilli L’Arronge
Multnomah County
344 Midnight at the Bright Ideas Bookstore Matthew Sullivan
King County Library
345 Midnight at the Electric Anderson, Jodi Lynn
Multnomah County
346 Midnight Line Lee Child The Spinoff
347 Milk Island Rhydian Thomas The Spinoff
348 Minds of Winter Ed O’Loughlin The Globe
349 Minecraft: The Island Max Brooks
Barnes & Noble
350 Mischling Affinity Konar
Independent
351 Mississippi Blood Greg Iles
Barnes & Noble
352 Moby Dick Chaboute
Multnomah County
353 Modern Gods Nick Laird
Financial Times
354 Modern Love Constance DeJong Entropy
355 Moonrise Sarah Crossan Today FM
356 Mother of All Pigs Malu Halasa
Chicago Review Of Books
357 My Ariel Sina Queyras The Globe
358 My Cat Yugoslavia Pajtim Statovci, translated from the Finnish by David Hackston
Boston Globe
359 My Heart Hemmed In Marie NDiaye Entropy
360 My Pictures After the Storm Veillé, Éric
Multnomah County
361 My Sister’s Bones Nuala Ellwood
Multnomah County
362 New American Best Friend Turnaround
363
Next Year, For Sure by Zoey Leigh Peterson
The Globe
364 Niko Draws a Feeling Bob Raczka
Multnomah County
365 Nine Folds Make a Paper Swan Ruth Gilligan
Shelf Awareness
366 No One Can Pronounce My Name Rakesh Satyal Entropy
367 No One Is Coming to Save Us Stephanie Powell Watts
The Washington Post
368 Noisy Night Mac Barnett
Multnomah County
369 Not One Day Anne Garréta Entropy
370 Notes of A Crocodile Qiu Miaojin Entropy
371 Now Antoinette Portis
Multnomah County
372 Oathbringer Brandon Sanderson Paste
373 Odd and True Cat Winters
Multnomah County
374 Oh My God, What a Complete Aisling Emer McLysaght and Sarah Breen Today FM
375 On a Magical Do Nothing Day Beatrice Alemagna
Multnomah County
376 One Mixed-up Night Catherine Newman
Multnomah County
377 One of the Boys: A Novel Daniel Magariel Amazon
378 Our Little Secret Roz Nay
Canadian Gift Guide
379 Party Girls Die in Pearls: An Oxford Girl Mystery Plum Sykes
Multnomah County
380 Pashmina Nidhi Chanani
Multnomah County
381 Piecing Me Together Renée Watson
Multnomah County
382 Princess Cora and the Crocodile Laura Amy Schlitz
Multnomah County
383 Professional Crocodile Giovanna Zoboli
Multnomah County
384 Provenance Ann Leckie
Multnomah County
385 Rat queens. Volume four, High fantasies Kurtis J. Wiebe and Owen Gieni
Multnomah County
386 Real Friends Shannon Hale
Multnomah County
387 Record of a Night Too Brief Hiromi Kawakami Thrillist
388 Release Patrick Ness
Multnomah County
389 Rich People Problems (Crazy Rich Asians, #3) Kevin Kwan Goodreads
390 Room Little Darker
The Guardian
391 Rotten Row Petina Gappah Noted
392 Running With Raven Laura Lee Huttenbach
Notes In The Margin
393 Saga, vol. 7 Brian K. Vaughan and Fiona Staples
Multnomah County
394 Saints and Misfits S.K. Ali
Multnomah County
395 Saints for All Occasions theWhat
396 Savage Theories Pola Oloixarac, translated from the Spanish by Roy Kesey
Boston Globe
397 Scarborough Catherine Hernandez The Globe
398 Second Chance Girl Susan Mallery
Bookbub Blog
399 See What I Have Done Sarah Schmidt
Publishers Weekly
400 See You in September Charity Norman Noted
401 See You in the Cosmos Jack Cheng
Multnomah County
402 Selection Day Aravind Adiga
The New York Times
403 Selection Day Aravind Adiga
The Washington Post
404 Shadowbahn Steve Erickson LA Times
405 Shadowbahn Steve Erickson
Vol.1 Brooklyn
406 shifting bodies Surreal epidemics
Vol.1 Brooklyn
407 Short Century David Burr Gerrard’s debut
Vol.1 Brooklyn
408 Silk Flowers Meghan Lamb Entropy
409 Since I Laid My Burden Down Brontez Purnell
Shelf Awareness
410 SIX FOUR Hideo Yokoyama. Translated by Jonathan Lloyd-Davies
The New York Times
411 Sleeping Beauties Stephen King
Barnes & Noble
412 Smells Like Finn Spirit Randy Henderson
Multnomah County
413 So Much Love Rebecca Rosenblum The Globe
414 Sodden Downstream Brannavan Gnanalingam The Spinoff
415 Sonata In K Karen An-Hwei Lee Entropy
416 Songy Of Paradise Gary Panter LA Times
417 South Pole Station Ashley Shelby
Shelf Awareness
418 Spaceman of Bohemia theWhat
419 Sputnik’s Guide to Life on Earth Cottrell Boyce, Frank
Multnomah County
420 Startup Doree Shafrir
Multnomah County
421 Strange Heart Beating Eli Goldstone
Chicago Review Of Books
422 Strange the Dreamer Laini Taylor
Multnomah County
423 Such Small Hands
The Guardian
424 Sudden Death Alvaro Enrigue
Independent
425 Swimmer Among The Stars
Hudson Booksellers
426 Sympathy Olivia Sudjic
Large Hearted Boy
427 Tales of Falling and Flying Ben Loory Entropy
428 Temporary People Deepak Unnukrisksn
Amber Sparks
429 Tess Kirsten McDougall The Spinoff
430 The Accomplished Guest Ann Beattie
The Washington Post
431 The Australian Emma Smith-Stevens
Large Hearted Boy
432 The Bad Luck Bride Janna MacGregor
King County Library
433 The Barrowfields Phillip Lewis
Multnomah County
434 The Blood Miracles Lisa McInerney
Financial Times
435 The Bone Witch Rin Chupeco
Multnomah County
436 The Book of Polly Kathy Hepinstall
Multnomah County
437 The Break Marian Keyes Today FM
438 The Breakdown B. A. Paris
Barnes & Noble
439 The Carpenter Bruna Barros
Multnomah County
440 The Chilbury Ladies’ Choir Jennifer Ryan theWhat
441 The Child Fiona Barton
Bookbub Blog
442 The Complete Ballet John Haskell Entropy
443 The Complete Stories of Leonora Carrington Leonora Carrington Entropy
444 The Corpses of the Future Lynn Crosbie The Globe
445 The Cuban Affair Nelson DeMille
Barnes & Noble
446 The Dark and Other Love Stories Deborah Willis The Globe
447 The Dark Lake Sarah Bailey
Barnes & Noble
448 The Destroyers Christopher Bollen Paste
449 The Doll’s Alphabet Camilla Grudova
Chicago Review Of Books
450 The Dying Detective Leif G.W.Persson
Multnomah County
451 The End We Start From Megan Hunter MPR News
452 The Epic Crush of Genie Lo F.C. Lee
Multnomah County
453 The Evening Road Laird Hunt
Financial Times
454 The Fall Guy James Lasdun
Financial Times
455 The Fire Night
Multnomah County
456 The Force Don Winslow
Dallas News
457 The Future Won’t Be Long Jarett Kobek
The Portable Infinite
458 The Futures theWhat
459 The Gauntlet Karuna Riazi
Multnomah County
460 The Girl in Green Derek B. Miller
Shelf Awareness
461 The Girl Who Takes an Eye for an Eye David Lagercrantz
Barnes & Noble
462 The Girl with Kaleidoscope Eyes David Handler
Multnomah County
463 The Golden Cockerel & Other Writings Juan Rulfo Entropy
464 The Golden Hour T. Greenwood
Multnomah County
465 The Good Daughter: A Novel Karin Slaughter
Barnes & Noble
466 The Gospel According to Blindboy Boatclub Blindboy Boatclub Today FM
467 The Graybar Hotel Curtis Dawkins Thrillist
468 The Gurugu Pledge Juan Tomás Ávila Laurel
Vol.1 Brooklyn
469 The Heirs theWhat
470 The Hope Fault Tracy Farr Noted
471 The Identicals Elin Hilderbrand Goodreads
472 The Imposter Javier Cercas
Independent
473 The Jane Austen Project Kathleen Flynn
Multnomah County
474 The Keeper of Lost Things Ruth Hogan Goodreads
475 The Ladies Sara Veglahn Entropy
476 The Last Ballad Wiley Cash
Multnomah County
477 The Last Days of Magic Turnaround
478 The Last Hours Minette Walters Noted
479 The Last Mrs. Parrish Liv Constantine
Multnomah County
480 The Legend of Rock Paper Scissors Drew Daywalt
Multnomah County
481 The Life to Come Michelle de Kretser The Spinoff
482 The Little Big Things Henry Fraser
Bookbub Blog
483 The Lockpicker Leonard Chang
Multnomah County
484 The Long Dry Cynan Jones
Multnomah County
485 The Luckiest Scar on Earth Ana Maria Spagna
Multnomah County
486 The Lucky Ones Julianne Pachico Paste
487 The Misfortune of Marion Palm Emily Culliton
Canadian Gift Guide
488 The Necessary Angel CK Stead Noted
489 The New Animals Pip Adam The Spinoff
490 The North Water Ian McGuire theWhat
491 The Original Face Guillaume Morissette The Globe
492 The Passion of Woo & Isolde Jennifer Tseng Entropy
493 The Possessions Sara Flannery Murphy
Multnomah County
494 The President’s Glasses Peter Donnelly Today FM
495 The President’s Gardens
The Guardian
496 The Prey of Gods Nicky Drayden
Multnomah County
497 The Protester Has Been Released Janet Sarbanes Entropy
498 The Rat Catcher’s Olympics Colin Cotterill
Multnomah County
499 The Readymade Thief Augustus Rose
Chicago Review Of Books
500 The Reason You’re Alive Matthew Quick
Multnomah County
501 The Redemption of Galen Pike Carys Davies The Globe
502 The River Bank Kij Johnson. Illustrated by Kathleen Jennings
The Washington Post
503 The River of Kings Taylor Brown Paste
504 The Road Home Katie Cotton
Multnomah County
505 The Rooster Bar John Grisham
Barnes & Noble
506 The Scariest Book Ever Bob Shea
Multnomah County
507 The Secret Room Kazim Ali Entropy
508 The Shades of Magic series V.E. Schwab
Fictional Flowerday
509 The Shoe on the Roof Will Ferguson The Globe
510 The Sinner Turnaround
511 The Stars Beneath Our Feet Moore, David Barclay
Multnomah County
512 The Stolen Bicycle Turnaround
513 The Stolen Marriage: A Novel Diane Chamberlain
Barnes & Noble
514 The Story of Arthur Truluv Elizabeth Berg
Bookbub Blog
515 The Strange Case of the Alchemist’s Daughter Theodora Goss
King County Library
516 The Sun and Her Flowers Rupi Kaur The Globe
517 The Sun Is Also A Star Nicola Yoon
Multnomah County
518 The Talented Ribkins Ladee Hubbard
Multnomah County
519 The Teeth of the Comb and Other Stories Osama Alomar
Amber Sparks
520 The Thing About Love Julie James
Multnomah County
521 The Thirst Jo Nesbø Paste
522 The Town Shaun Prescott Readings
523 The Tragic Death of Eleanor Marx Tara Bergin The Spinoff
524 The Truth About Me Louise Marburg Entropy
525 The Twenty Days of Turin Giorgio de Maria
Vol.1 Brooklyn
526 The Unbeatable Squirrel Girl beats up the Marvel Universe! Ryan North and Erica Henderson
Multnomah County
527 The Vanishing Princess Jenny Diski
Amber Sparks
528 The Wanderers theWhat
529 The Way Home in the Night Akiko Miyakoshi
Multnomah County
530 The Weight of Ink Rachel Kadish Amazon
531 The Wish Granter C. J. Redwine
Multnomah County
532 THE WOMAN IN CABIN 10 Ruth Ware Indigo
533 The Woman Who Lived Amongst the Cannibals Robert Kloss
Amber Sparks
534 The Wonderous Science, Book 1 of the mysteries of the Laurel Society Brian & Josie Parker
Multnomah County
535 The Word is Murder Anthony Horowitz Today FM
536 The World Goes On László Krasznahorkai Entropy
537 The Wrong Train Jeremy de Quidt
Multnomah County
538 The Year of the Comet Sergel Levedev
Shelf Awareness
539 They Both Die at the End Adam Silvera
Fictional Flowerday
540 This Accident of Being Lost Leanne Betasamosake Simpson The Globe
541 This is Memorial Device David Keenan The Spinoff
542 Thornhill Pam Smy
Multnomah County
543 TIES Domenico Starnone. Translated by Jhumpa Lahiri
The New York Times
544 Tin Man Sarah Winman Today FM
545 Tornado Weather Deborah E. Kennedy
Multnomah County
546 Touch Courtney Maum Electric Lit
547 Town is the Sea
Multnomah County
548 Traitor to the Throne Alwyn Hamilton
Notes In The Margin
549 Turn Loose our Death Rays and Kill them All!: The complete works of Fletcher Hanks Fletcher Hanks
Multnomah County
550 Twenty Days of Turin Giorgio DeMaria
Multnomah County
551 Twin Peaks: The Final Dossier Mark Frost Thrillist
552 Two Kinds of Truth Michael Connelly
Barnes & Noble
553 Vicious Circle C. J. Box
Barnes & Noble
554 Waking Gods Sylvain Neuvel Paste
555 WAKING LIONS Ayelet Gundar-Goshen. Translated by Sondra Silverston
The New York Times
556 Watch Me Disappear Janelle Brown
Barnes & Noble
557 We Were the Lucky Ones Georgia Hunter
Bookbub Blog
558 We Were Witches Turnaround
559 We’ll All Be Burnt in Our Beds Some Night Joel Thomas Hynes The Globe
560 Well, That Was Awkward Rachel Vail
Multnomah County
561 When Dimple Met Rishi Sandhya Menon
Multnomah County
562 When Light is Like Water Molly McCloskey Today FM
563 Where’s Halmoni? Julie Kim
Multnomah County
564 WHEREAS Layli Long Soldier
The New York Times
565 Wilde in Love: The Wildes of Lindow Castle Eloisa James
Multnomah County
566 Within the Sanctuary of Wings Marie Brennan
Multnomah County
567 Wolf in the Snow Matthew Cordell
Multnomah County
568 Wonder Valley Ivy Pochoda LA Times
569 Writers Who Love Too Much: New Narrative Writing 1977-1997 Edited Dodie Bellamy & Kevin Killian Entropy
570 You Bring the Distant Near Perkins, Mitali
Multnomah County
571 You Should Have Left Daniel Kehlmann
Multnomah County


51 Best Fiction Book Sources/Lists Of 2017



Source Article
Amazon Best literature and fiction of 2017
Amber Sparks Best (Subjective) Books of 2017
Barnes & Noble The Best Books of 2017
Book Riot THEFOLLOWINGAREBOOKRIOT’SBESTBOOKSOF2017.
Bookbub Blog 25 Books to Read Before Year’s End, According to Bestselling Authors
Boston Globe The best books of 2017
Bustle The 17 Best Fiction Books Of 2017
BuzzFeed The 24 Best Fiction Books Of 2017
Canadian Gift Guide HOLIDAY READS: BEST FICTION BOOKS 2017
Chicago Review Of Books The Best Fiction Books of 2017
Chicago Tribune Best books of 2017: Fiction and nonfiction that moved literature forward
Dallas News From East Texas to Jonestown and beyond: Our culture critic names his 10 favorite books of 2017
Electric Lit Electric Literature’s 25 Best Novels of 2017
Entropy BEST OF 2017: BEST FICTION BOOKS
Fictional Flowerday Best books of 2017… according to me!
Financial Times Best books of 2017: Fiction
Goodreads Best Fiction
Hudson Booksellers Best Books of 2017
Huffington post The Best Fiction Books Of 2017
Independent 9 best fiction books of 2017
Indigo TOP 10 FICTION OF 2017
Island Books Our Best of the Year 2017: Fiction
King County Library Best Fiction 2017
Kirkus Best Literary Fiction of 2017
LA Times Best books of 2017: The best fiction
Large Hearted Boy Favorite Novels of 2017
Michael Magras My Favorite Books from 2017
MPR News The best books to give and get: Fiction picks of 2017
Multnomah County The Best Books of 2017
Noted The 100 Best Books of 2017
Notes In The Margin Our Favorite Books of 2017
Paste The 25 Best Novels of 2017
Publishers Weekly Best Fiction
Readings The best fiction books of 2017
Shelf Awareness Our Best Adult Books of 2017
Sit Tableside Favorite Books of 2017
Southern Living The Best Books of 2017
The Economist Books of the Year 2017
The Globe The Globe 100
The Guardian The best fiction of 2017
The New York Times 100 Notable Books of 2017
The Portable Infinite Best Books of 2017
The Seattle Times Noteworthy books of 2017: general fiction
The Spinoff The best books of 2017: the 20 best novels
The Washington Post 50 notable works of fiction in 2017
theWhat 25 Best Fiction Books 2017
Thrillist THE BEST BOOKS OF 2017 TO GIVE TO ANYONE ON YOUR LIST
Time The Top 10 Novels of 2017
Today FM The Best Fiction Books Of The Year
Turnaround Favourite Fiction 2017
Vol.1 Brooklyn Vol.1 Brooklyn’s 2017 Favorites: Fiction

 

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