The Best Books Of 2018 (So Far) – An Aggregated List Of Lists

“What are the Best Books of 2018?” We looked at 24 “Best Books of 2018 (so far)” lists, aggregating and ranking the 289 top books that appeared so we could answer that very question!

The top 48 films, all appearing on 2 or more “Best Books of 2018” book lists, are ranked below by how many times they appear. The remaining 200+ books, as well as the sources we used, are in alphabetical order on the bottom of the page.

Make sure to check out our sister site, Cinema Dailies, for the Best Movies Of 2018!

Happy Scrolling!



Top 48 Best Books Of 2018



48 .) A Princess In Theory by Alyssa Cole

Lists It Appears On:

  • Book Riot
  • Thrillist

From acclaimed author Alyssa Cole comes the tale of a city Cinderella and her Prince Charming in disguise . . . Between grad school and multiple jobs, Naledi Smith doesn’t have time for fairy tales…or patience for the constant e-mails claiming she’s betrothed to an African prince. Sure. Right. Delete! As a former foster kid, she’s learned that the only things she can depend on are herself and the scientific method, and a silly e-mail won’t convince her otherwise. Prince Thabiso is the sole heir to the throne of Thesolo, shouldering the hopes of his parents and his people. At the top of their list? His marriage. Ever dutiful, he tracks down his missing betrothed. When Naledi mistakes the prince for a pauper, Thabiso can’t resist the chance to experience life—and love—without the burden of his crown. The chemistry between them is instant and irresistible, and flirty friendship quickly evolves into passionate nights. But when the truth is revealed, can a princess in theory become a princess ever after?

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47 .) Calypso by David Sedaris

Lists It Appears On:

  • AV Club
  • Book Marks

David Sedaris returns with his most deeply personal and darkly hilarious book. If you’ve ever laughed your way through David Sedaris’s cheerfully misanthropic stories, you might think you know what you’re getting with Calypso. You’d be wrong. When he buys a beach house on the Carolina coast, Sedaris envisions long, relaxing vacations spent playing board games and lounging in the sun with those he loves most. And life at the Sea Section, as he names the vacation home, is exactly as idyllic as he imagined, except for one tiny, vexing realization: it’s impossible to take a vacation from yourself. With Calypso, Sedaris sets his formidable powers of observation toward middle age and mortality. Make no mistake: these stories are very, very funny–it’s a book that can make you laugh ’til you snort, the way only family can. Sedaris’s powers of observation have never been sharper, and his ability to shock readers into laughter unparalleled. But much of the comedy here is born out of that vertiginous moment when your own body betrays you and you realize that the story of your life is made up of more past than future. This is beach reading for people who detest beaches, required reading for those who loathe small talk and love a good tumor joke. Calypso is simultaneously Sedaris’s darkest and warmest book yet–and it just might be his very best.

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46 .) Feel Free by Zadie Smith

Lists It Appears On:

  • Book Marks
  • Time

Since she burst spectacularly into view with her debut novel almost two decades ago, Zadie Smith has established herself not just as one of the world’s preeminent fiction writers, but also a brilliant and singular essayist. She contributes regularly to The New Yorker and the New York Review of Books on a range of subjects, and each piece of hers is a literary event in its own right. Arranged into five sections – In the World, In the Audience, In the Gallery, On the Bookshelf, and Feel Free – this new collection poses questions we immediately recognize. What is The Social Network, and Facebook itself, really about? “It’s a cruel portrait of us: 500 million sentient people entrapped in the recent careless thoughts of a Harvard sophomore.” Why do we love libraries? “Well-run libraries are filled with people because what a good library offers cannot be easily found elsewhere: an indoor public space in which you do not have to buy anything in order to stay.” What will we tell our granddaughters about our collective failure to address global warming? “So I might say to her, look: the thing you have to appreciate is that we’d just been through a century of relativism and deconstruction, in which we were informed that most of our fondest-held principles were either uncertain or simple wishful thinking, and in many areas of our lives we had already been asked to accept that nothing is essential and everything changes and this had taken the fight out of us somewhat.” Gathering in one place for the first time previously unpublished work, as well as already classic essays, such as, Joy, and, Find Your Beach, Feel Free offers a survey of important recent events in culture and politics, as well as Smith’s own life. Equally at home in the world of good books and bad politics, Brooklyn-born rappers and the work of Swiss novelists, she is by turns wry, heartfelt, indignant, and incisive and never any less than perfect company. This is literary journalism at its zenith.

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45 .) Freshwater by Akwaeke Emezi

Lists It Appears On:

  • Book Marks
  • EW

Freshwater explores the surreal experience of having a fractured self. It centers around a young Nigerian woman, Ada, who develops separate selves within her as a result of being born “with one foot on the other side.” Unsettling, heartwrenching, dark, and powerful, Freshwater is a sharp evocation of a rare way of experiencing the world, one that illuminates how we all construct our identities. Ada begins her life in the south of Nigeria as a troubled baby and a source of deep concern to her family. Her parents, Saul and Saachi, successfully prayed her into existence, but as she grows into a volatile and splintered child, it becomes clear that something went terribly awry. When Ada comes of age and moves to America for college, the group of selves within her grows in power and agency. A traumatic assault leads to a crystallization of her alternate selves: Asụghara and Saint Vincent. As Ada fades into the background of her own mind and these selves–now protective, now hedonistic–move into control, Ada’s life spirals in a dark and dangerous direction. Narrated by the various selves within Ada and based in the author’s realities, Freshwater dazzles with ferocious energy and serpentine grace, heralding the arrival of a fierce new literary voice.

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44 .) From Twinkle, With Love by Sandhya Menon

Lists It Appears On:

  • Book Riot
  • The Young Folks

Aspiring filmmaker and wallflower Twinkle Mehra has stories she wants to tell and universes she wants to explore, if only the world would listen. So when fellow film geek Sahil Roy approaches her to direct a movie for the upcoming Summer Festival, Twinkle is all over it. The chance to publicly showcase her voice as a director? Dream come true. The fact that it gets her closer to her longtime crush, Neil Roy—a.k.a. Sahil’s twin brother? Dream come true x 2. When mystery man “N” begins emailing her, Twinkle is sure it’s Neil, finally ready to begin their happily-ever-after. The only slightly inconvenient problem is that, in the course of movie-making, she’s fallen madly in love with the irresistibly adorkable Sahil. Twinkle soon realizes that resistance is futile: The romance she’s got is not the one she’s scripted. But will it be enough? Told through the letters Twinkle writes to her favorite female filmmakers, From Twinkle, with Love navigates big truths about friendship, family, and the unexpected places love can find you.

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43 .) Girls Burn Brighter by Shobha Rao

Lists It Appears On:

  • Amazon
  • Working Mother

A searing, electrifying debut novel set in India and America, about a once-in-a-lifetime friendship between two girls who are driven apart but never stop trying to find one another again. When Poornima first meets Savitha, she feels something she thought she lost for good when her mother died: hope. Poornima’s father hires Savitha to work one of their sari looms, and the two girls are quickly drawn to one another. Savitha is even more impoverished than Poornima, but she is full of passion and energy. She shows Poornima how to find beauty in a bolt of indigo cloth, a bowl of yogurt rice and bananas, the warmth of friendship. Suddenly their Indian village doesn’t feel quite so claustrophobic, and Poornima begins to imagine a life beyond the arranged marriage her father is desperate to lock down for her. But when a devastating act of cruelty drives Savitha away, Poornima leaves behind everything she has ever known to find her friend again. Her journey takes her into the darkest corners of India’s underworld, on a harrowing cross-continental journey, and eventually to an apartment complex in Seattle. Alternating between the girls’ perspectives as they face relentless obstacles, Girls Burn Brighter introduces two heroines who never lose the hope that burns within them. In breathtaking prose, Shobha Rao tackles the most urgent issues facing women today: domestic abuse, human trafficking, immigration, and feminism. At once a propulsive page-turner and a heart-wrenching meditation on friendship, Rao’s debut novel is a literary tour de force.

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42 .) God Save Texas by Lawrence Wright

Lists It Appears On:

  • Amazon
  • Book Marks

With humor and the biting insight of a native, the Pulitzer Prize-winning author of The Looming Tower explores the history, culture, and politics of Texas, while holding the stereotypes up for rigorous scrutiny. God Save Texas is a journey through the most controversial state in America. It is a red state in the heart of Trumpland that hasn’t elected a Democrat to a statewide office in more than twenty years; but it is also a state in which minorities already form a majority (including the largest number of Muslims). The cities are blue and among the most diverse in the nation. Oil is still king but Texas now leads California in technology exports. The Texas economic model of low taxes and minimal regulation has produced extraordinary growth but also striking income disparities. Texas looks a lot like the America that Donald Trump wants to create. And Wright’s profound portrait of the state not only reflects our country back as it is, but as it was and as it might be.

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41 .) Grist Mill Road by Christopher J. Yates

Lists It Appears On:

  • Joseph Mallozzi
  • News Week

Twenty-six years ago Hannah had her eye shot out. Now she wants justice. But is she blind to the truth? Christopher J. Yates’s cult hit Black Chalk introduced that rare writerly talent: a literary writer who could write a plot with the intricacy of a brilliant mental puzzle, and with characters so absorbing that readers are immediately gripped. Yates’s new book does not disappoint. Grist Mill Road is a dark, twisted, and expertly plotted Rashomon-style tale. The year is 1982; the setting, an Edenic hamlet some ninety miles north of New York City. There, among the craggy rock cliffs and glacial ponds of timeworn mountains, three friends—Patrick, Matthew, and Hannah—are bound together by a terrible and seemingly senseless crime. Twenty-six years later, in New York City, living lives their younger selves never could have predicted, the three meet again—with even more devastating results.

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40 .) High White Sun by J. Todd Scott

Lists It Appears On:

  • News Week
  • The Real Book Spy

In this fiery and violent new sequel to The Far Empty, even though Sheriff Ross is dead and gone, outlaws still walk free, peace comes at a price, and redemption remains hard to find. Some things in the Big Bend never change. Sometimes we have to be wolves . . . In the wake of Sheriff Stanford Ross’s death, former deputy Chris Cherry—now Sheriff Cherry—is the new “law” in Big Bend County, yet he still struggles to escape the long, dark shadow of that infamous lawman. As Chris tries to remake and modernize his corrupt department, bringing in new deputies, including young America Reynosa and Ben Harper—a hard-edged veteran homicide detective now lured out of retirement—he finds himself constantly staring down a town unwilling to change, friends and enemies unable to let go of the past, and the harsh limits of his badge. But it’s only when a local Rio Grande guide is brutally and inexplicably murdered, and America and Ben’s ongoing investigation is swept aside by a secretive federal agent, that the novice sheriff truly understands just how tenuous his hold on that badge really is. And as other new threats rise right along with the unforgiving West Texas sun, nothing can prepare Chris for the high cost of crossing dangerous men such as John Wesley Earl, a high-ranking member of the Aryan Brotherhood of Texas and the patriarch of a murderous clan that’s descended on Chris’s hometown of Murfee; or Thurman Flowers, a part-time pastor and full-time white supremacist hell-bent on founding his violent Church of Purity in the very heart of the Big Bend. Before long, Chris, America, and Ben are outmaneuvered, outnumbered, and outgunned—inexorably drawn into a nearly twenty-year vendetta that began with a murdered Texas Ranger on a dusty highway outside of Sweetwater, and that can only end with fire, blood, and bullets in Murfee’s own sun-scorched streets . . . Welcome back to the Big Bend . . .

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39 .) Junk by Tommy Pico

Lists It Appears On:

  • Book Marks
  • Book Riot

The third book in Tommy Pico’s Teebs trilogy, Junk is a breakup poem in couplets: ice floe and hot lava, a tribute to Janet Jackson and nacho cheese. In the static that follows the loss of a job or an apartment or a boyfriend, what can you grab onto for orientation? The narrator wonders what happens to the sense of self when the illusion of security has been stripped away. And for an indigenous person, how do these lost markers of identity echo larger cultural losses and erasures in a changing political landscape? In part taking its cue from A.R. Ammons’s Garbage, Teebs names this liminal space “Junk,” in the sense that a junk shop is full of old things waiting for their next use; different items that collectively become indistinct. But can there be a comfort outside the anxiety of utility? An appreciation of “being” for the sake of being? And will there be Chili Cheese Fritos?

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38 .) Kudos by Rachel Cusk

Lists It Appears On:

  • Book Marks
  • Vulture

Rachel Cusk, the award-winning and critically acclaimed author of Outline and Transit, completes the transcendent literary trilogy with Kudos, a novel of unsettling power. A woman writer visits a Europe in flux, where questions of personal and political identity are rising to the surface and the trauma of change is opening up new possibilities of loss and renewal. Within the rituals of literary culture, Faye finds the human story in disarray amid differing attitudes toward the public performance of the creative persona. She begins to identify among the people she meets a tension between truth and representation, a fissure that accrues great dramatic force as Kudos reaches a profound and beautiful climax. In this conclusion to her groundbreaking trilogy, Cusk unflinchingly explores the nature of family and art, justice and love, and the ultimate value of suffering. She is without question one of our most important living writers.

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37 .) Look Alive Out There by Sloane Crosley

Lists It Appears On:

  • Amazon
  • AV Club

From the New York Times-bestselling author Sloane Crosley comes Look Alive Out There―a brand-new collection of essays filled with her trademark hilarity, wit, and charm. The characteristic heart and punch-packing observations are back, but with a newfound coat of maturity. A thin coat. More of a blazer, really. Fans of I Was Told There’d Be Cake and How Did You Get This Number know Sloane Crosley’s life as a series of relatable but madcap misadventures. In Look Alive Out There, whether it’s scaling active volcanoes, crashing shivas, playing herself on Gossip Girl, befriending swingers, or staring down the barrel of the fertility gun, Crosley continues to rise to the occasion with unmatchable nerve and electric one-liners. And as her subjects become more serious, her essays deliver not just laughs but lasting emotional heft and insight. Crosley has taken up the gauntlets thrown by her predecessors―Dorothy Parker, Nora Ephron, David Sedaris―and crafted something rare, affecting, and true. Look Alive Out There arrives on the tenth anniversary of I Was Told There’d be Cake, and Crosley’s essays have managed to grow simultaneously more sophisticated and even funnier. And yet she’s still very much herself, and it’s great to have her back―and not a moment too soon (or late, for that matter).

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36 .) Macbeth by Jo Nesbø

Lists It Appears On:

  • News Week
  • She Reads

He’s the best cop they’ve got. When a drug bust turns into a bloodbath it’s up to Inspector Macbeth and his team to clean up the mess. He’s also an ex-drug addict with a troubled past. He’s rewarded for his success. Power. Money. Respect. They’re all within reach. But a man like him won’t get to the top. Plagued by hallucinations and paranoia, Macbeth starts to unravel. He’s convinced he won’t get what is rightfully his. Unless he kills for it.

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35 .) Sea of Strangers by Lang Leav

Lists It Appears On:

  • News Week
  • Ravenous Forest Reads

Sea of Strangers by Lang Leav picks up from her previous international bestselling books including Love & Misadventure, Lullabies, and The Universe of Us, and sets sail for a grand new adventure. This completely original collection of poetry and prose will not only delight her avid fans but is sure to capture the imagination of a whole new audience. With the turn of every page, Sea of Strangers invites you to go beyond love and loss to explore themes of self-discovery and empowerment as you navigate your way around the human heart.

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34 .) See What Can Be Done by Lorrie Moore

Lists It Appears On:

  • Book Marks
  • News Week

A welcome surprise: more than fifty prose pieces, gathered together for the first time, by one of America’s most revered and admired novelists and short-story writers, whose articles, essays, and cultural commentary–appearing in The New York Review of Books, The New York Times Book Review, The New Yorker, The Atlantic, The Guardian, Harper’s Magazine, and elsewhere–have been parsing the political, artistic, and media idiom for the last three decades. From Lorrie Moore’s earliest reviews of novels by Margaret Atwood and Nora Ephron, to an essay on Ezra Edelman’s 2016 O.J. Simpson documentary, and in between: Moore on the writing of fiction (the work of V. S. Pritchett, Don DeLillo, Philip Roth, Joyce Carol Oates, Alice Munro, Stanley Elkin, Dawn Powell, Nicholson Baker, et al.) . . . on the continuing unequal state of race in America . . . on the shock of the shocking GOP . . . on the dangers (and cruel truths) of celebrity marriages and love affairs . . . on the wilds of television (The Wire, Friday Night Lights, Into the Abyss, Girls, Homeland, True Detective, Making a Murderer) . . . on the (d)evolving environment . . . on terrorism, the historical imagination, and the world’s newest form of novelist . . . on the lesser (and larger) lives of biography and the midwifery between art and life (Ana�s Nin, Marilyn Monroe, John Cheever, Edna St. Vincent Millay, Eudora Welty, Bernard Malamud, among others) . . . and on the high art of being Helen Gurley Brown . . . and much, much more. “Fifty years from now, it may well turn out that the work of very few American writers has as much to say about what it means to be alive in our time as that of Lorrie Moore” (Harper’s Magazine).

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33 .) That Kind of Mother by Rumaan Alam

Lists It Appears On:

  • EW
  • Nylon

From the celebrated author of Rich and Pretty, a novel about the families we fight to build and those we fight to keep Like many first-time mothers, Rebecca Stone finds herself both deeply in love with her newborn son and deeply overwhelmed. Struggling to juggle the demands of motherhood with her own aspirations and feeling utterly alone in the process, she reaches out to the only person at the hospital who offers her any real help—Priscilla Johnson—and begs her to come home with them as her son’s nanny. Priscilla’s presence quickly does as much to shake up Rebecca’s perception of the world as it does to stabilize her life. Rebecca is white, and Priscilla is black, and through their relationship, Rebecca finds herself confronting, for the first time, the blind spots of her own privilege. She feels profoundly connected to the woman who essentially taught her what it means to be a mother. When Priscilla dies unexpectedly in childbirth, Rebecca steps forward to adopt the baby. But she is unprepared for what it means to be a white mother with a black son. As she soon learns, navigating motherhood for her is a matter of learning how to raise two children whom she loves with equal ferocity, but whom the world is determined to treat differently. Written with the warmth and psychological acuity that defined his debut, Rumaan Alam has crafted a remarkable novel about the lives we choose, and the lives that are chosen for us.

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32 .) The Electric Woman by Tessa Fontaine

Lists It Appears On:

  • Amazon
  • Working Mother

A daughter’s astonishing memoir of pushing past fear, through life in a traveling sideshow and her mother’s illness Turns out, one lesson applies to living through illness, keeping the show on the road, letting go of the person you love most, and eating fire: The trick is there is no trick. You eat fire by eating fire. Two journeys—a daughter’s and a mother’s—bear witness to this lesson in The Electric Woman. For three years Tessa Fontaine lived in a constant state of emergency as her mother battled stroke after stroke. But hospitals, wheelchairs, and loss of language couldn’t hold back such a woman; she and her husband would see Italy together, come what may. Thus Fontaine became free to follow her own piper, a literal giant inviting her to “come play” in the World of Wonders, America’s last traveling sideshow. How could she resist? Transformed into an escape artist, a snake charmer, and a high-voltage Electra, Fontaine witnessed the marvels of carnival life: intense camaraderie and heartbreak, the guilty thrill of hard-earned cash exchanged for a peek into the impossible, and, most marvelous of all, the stories carnival folks tell about themselves. Through these, Fontaine trained her body to ignore fear and learned how to keep her heart open in the face of loss. A story for anyone who has ever imagined running away with the circus, wanted to be someone else, or wanted a loved one to live forever, The Electric Woman is ultimately about death-defying acts of all kinds, especially that ever constant: good old-fashioned unconditional love.

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31 .) The Great Alone: A Novel by Kristin Hannah

Lists It Appears On:

  • Amazon
  • Working Mother

Alaska, 1974. Unpredictable. Unforgiving. Untamed. For a family in crisis, the ultimate test of survival. Ernt Allbright, a former POW, comes home from the Vietnam war a changed and volatile man. When he loses yet another job, he makes an impulsive decision: he will move his family north, to Alaska, where they will live off the grid in America’s last true frontier. Thirteen-year-old Leni, a girl coming of age in a tumultuous time, caught in the riptide of her parents’ passionate, stormy relationship, dares to hope that a new land will lead to a better future for her family. She is desperate for a place to belong. Her mother, Cora, will do anything and go anywhere for the man she loves, even if it means following him into the unknown At first, Alaska seems to be the answer to their prayers. In a wild, remote corner of the state, they find a fiercely independent community of strong men and even stronger women. The long, sunlit days and the generosity of the locals make up for the Allbrights’ lack of preparation and dwindling resources. But as winter approaches and darkness descends on Alaska, Ernt’s fragile mental state deteriorates and the family begins to fracture. Soon the perils outside pale in comparison to threats from within. In their small cabin, covered in snow, blanketed in eighteen hours of night, Leni and her mother learn the terrible truth: they are on their own. In the wild, there is no one to save them but themselves. In this unforgettable portrait of human frailty and resilience, Kristin Hannah reveals the indomitable character of the modern American pioneer and the spirit of a vanishing Alaska―a place of incomparable beauty and danger. The Great Alone is a daring, beautiful, stay-up-all-night story about love and loss, the fight for survival, and the wildness that lives in both man and nature.

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30 .) The Perfect Nanny by Leila Slimani

Lists It Appears On:

  • Joseph Mallozzi
  • News Week

When Myriam, a mother and brilliant French-Moroccan lawyer, decides to return to work, she and her husband are forced to look for a caretaker for their two young children. They are thrilled to find Louise: the perfect nanny right from the start. Louise sings to the children, cleans the family’s beautiful apartment in Paris’s upscale tenth arrondissement, stays late whenever asked, and hosts enviable kiddie parties. But as the couple and the nanny become more dependent on each other, jealousy, resentment, and frustrations mount, shattering the idyllic tableau.

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29 .) The Poet X by Elizabeth Acevedo

Lists It Appears On:

  • Book Riot
  • Readings

A young girl in Harlem discovers slam poetry as a way to understand her mother’s religion and her own relationship to the world. Debut novel of renowned slam poet Elizabeth Acevedo. Xiomara Batista feels unheard and unable to hide in her Harlem neighborhood. Ever since her body grew into curves, she has learned to let her fists and her fierceness do the talking. But Xiomara has plenty she wants to say, and she pours all her frustration and passion onto the pages of a leather notebook, reciting the words to herself like prayers—especially after she catches feelings for a boy in her bio class named Aman, who her family can never know about. With Mami’s determination to force her daughter to obey the laws of the church, Xiomara understands that her thoughts are best kept to herself. So when she is invited to join her school’s slam poetry club, she doesn’t know how she could ever attend without her mami finding out, much less speak her words out loud. But still, she can’t stop thinking about performing her poems. Because in the face of a world that may not want to hear her, Xiomara refuses to be silent.

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28 .) The Rise and Fall of the Dinosaurs

Lists It Appears On:

  • Chapters
  • The Savvy Reader

New York Times Bestseller “THE ULTIMATE DINOSAUR BIOGRAPHY,” hails Scientific American: A sweeping and revelatory new history of the age of dinosaurs, from one of our finest young scientists. “This is scientific storytelling at its most visceral, striding with the beasts through their Triassic dawn, Jurassic dominance, and abrupt demise in the Cretaceous.” — Nature The dinosaurs. Sixty-six million years ago, the Earth’s most fearsome creatures vanished. Today they remain one of our planet’s great mysteries. Now The Rise and Fall of the Dinosaurs reveals their extraordinary, 200-million-year-long story as never before. In this captivating narrative (enlivened with more than seventy original illustrations and photographs), Steve Brusatte, a young American paleontologist who has emerged as one of the foremost stars of the field—naming fifteen new species and leading groundbreaking scientific studies and fieldwork—masterfully tells the complete, surprising, and new history of the dinosaurs, drawing on cutting-edge science to dramatically bring to life their lost world and illuminate their enigmatic origins, spectacular flourishing, astonishing diversity, cataclysmic extinction, and startling living legacy. Captivating and revelatory, The Rise and Fall of the Dinosaurs is a book for the ages. Brusatte traces the evolution of dinosaurs from their inauspicious start as small shadow dwellers—themselves the beneficiaries of a mass extinction caused by volcanic eruptions at the beginning of the Triassic period—into the dominant array of species every wide-eyed child memorizes today, T. rex, Triceratops, Brontosaurus, and more. This gifted scientist and writer re-creates the dinosaurs’ peak during the Jurassic and Cretaceous, when thousands of species thrived, and winged and feathered dinosaurs, the prehistoric ancestors of modern birds, emerged. The story continues to the end of the Cretaceous period, when a giant asteroid or comet struck the planet and nearly every dinosaur species (but not all) died out, in the most extraordinary extinction event in earth’s history, one full of lessons for today as we confront a “sixth extinction.” Brusatte also recalls compelling stories from his globe-trotting expeditions during one of the most exciting eras in dinosaur research—which he calls “a new golden age of discovery”—and offers thrilling accounts of some of the remarkable findings he and his colleagues have made, including primitive human-sized tyrannosaurs; monstrous carnivores even larger than T. rex; and paradigm-shifting feathered raptors from China. An electrifying scientific history that unearths the dinosaurs’ epic saga, The Rise and Fall of the Dinosaurs will be a definitive and treasured account for decades to come.

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27 .) The Sparsholt Affair by Alan Hollinghurst

Lists It Appears On:

  • Book Marks
  • Vulture

In 1940, Evert Dax and David Sparsholt, two young men from very different backgrounds, meet at Oxford University. Dax is a second year student reading English, coming from a rackety upper middle class background; Sparsholt is from a humbler Midlands community and is reading engineering, a young man whose good looks and fine figure have proved highly attractive to his peers. This time is a unique one in the history of the university: with military call-up at twenty, soon brought forward to nineteen, almost all students come up to Oxford knowing that they will only have a year or so of study. A sense of futility is mixed with one of recklessness. All life after dusk is lived under black-out, encouraging and covering what would normally be impossible liaisons. What happens to these two men in this year will affect many lives and will set in motion the mystery at the heart of The Sparsholt Affair. Alan Hollinghurst’s masterly novel takes us through several generations and across key periods of uncertainty and change in British society. From the darkest days of the Second World War, it moves to the changing world of the a socially and sexually liberated London of the 1960s, before landing in the mid-1970s, with the three-day week, fuel shortages and power cuts. The reverberations continue through the next generation in the 1990s before reaching a conclusion in the present decade, a world of new media and new ideas. Throughout the novel there is also an examination of the visual and aesthetic, looking at what it is to be Modern, through modernist architecture and abstract painting: we witness buildings being destroyed and replaced; we watch works of art go in and out of fashion. Featuring a remarkable cast of characters, The Sparsholt Affair is both thought-provoking and highly entertaining, a novel in which children are connected by the acts of their parents and individuals are both damaged and saved by the changing attitudes to sexuality, privacy and intimacy.

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26 .) The Tea Master and the Detective by Aliette de Bodard

Lists It Appears On:

  • Barnes & Noble
  • News Week

Welcome to the Scattered Pearls Belt, a collection of ring habitats and orbitals ruled by exiled human scholars and powerful families, and held together by living mindships who carry people and freight between the stars. In this fluid society, human and mindship avatars mingle in corridors and in function rooms, and physical and virtual realities overlap, the appareance of environments easily modified and adapted to interlocutors or current mood. A transport ship discharged from military service after a traumatic injury, The Shadow’s Child now ekes out a precarious living as a brewer of mind-altering drugs for the comfort of space-travellers. Meanwhile, abrasive and eccentric scholar Long Chau wants to find a corpse for a scientific study. When Long Chau walks into her office, The Shadow’s Child expects an unpleasant but easy assignment. When the corpse turns out to have been murdered, Long Chau feels compelled to investigate, dragging The Shadow’s Child with her. As they dig deep into the victim’s past, The Shadow’s Child realises that the investigation points to Long Chau’s own murky past–and, ultimately, to the dark and unbearable void that lies between the stars…

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25 .) Warlight: A Novel by Michael Ondaatje

Lists It Appears On:

  • Amazon
  • Chapters

In a narrative as mysterious as memory itself – at once both shadowed and luminous – Warlight is a vivid, thrilling novel of violence and love, intrigue and desire. It is 1945, and London is still reeling from the Blitz and years of war. 14-year-old Nathaniel and his sister, Rachel, are apparently abandoned by their parents, left in the care of an enigmatic figure named The Moth. They suspect he might be a criminal, and grow both more convinced and less concerned as they get to know his eccentric crew of friends: men and women with a shared history, all of whom seem determined now to protect, and educate (in rather unusual ways) Rachel and Nathaniel. But are they really what and who they claim to be? A dozen years later, Nathaniel begins to uncover all he didn’t know or understand in that time, and it is this journey – through reality, recollection, and imagination – that is told in this magnificent novel.

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24 .) White Houses by Amy Bloom

Lists It Appears On:

  • EW
  • News Week

For readers of The Paris Wife and The Swans of Fifth Avenue comes a “sensuous, captivating account of a forbidden affair between two women” (People)–Eleanor Roosevelt and “first friend” Lorena Hickok. Lorena Hickok meets Eleanor Roosevelt in 1932 while reporting on Franklin Roosevelt’s first presidential campaign. Having grown up worse than poor in South Dakota and reinvented herself as the most prominent woman reporter in America, “Hick,” as she’s known to her friends and admirers, is not quite instantly charmed by the idealistic, patrician Eleanor. But then, as her connection with the future first lady deepens into intimacy, what begins as a powerful passion matures into a lasting love, and a life that Hick never expected to have. She moves into the White House, where her status as “first friend” is an open secret, as are FDR’s own lovers. After she takes a job in the Roosevelt administration, promoting and protecting both Roosevelts, she comes to know Franklin not only as a great president but as a complicated rival and an irresistible friend, capable of changing lives even after his death. Through it all, even as Hick’s bond with Eleanor is tested by forces both extraordinary and common, and as she grows as a woman and a writer, she never loses sight of the love of her life. From Washington, D.C. to Hyde Park, from a little white house on Long Island to an apartment on Manhattan’s Washington Square, Amy Bloom’s new novel moves elegantly through fascinating places and times, written in compelling prose and with emotional depth, wit, and acuity. Praise for White Houses “Amy Bloom brings an untold slice of history so dazzlingly and devastatingly to life, it took my breath away.”–Paula McLain, author of The Paris Wife “Vivid and tender . . . Bloom–interweaving fact and fancy–lavishes attention on [Hickok], bringing Hick, the novel’s narrator and true subject, to radiant life.”–O: The Oprah Magazine “Radiant . . . an indelible love story, one propelled not by unlined youth and beauty but by the kind of soul-mate connection even distance, age, and impossible circumstances couldn’t dim . . . Bloom’s goal is less to relitigate history than to portray the blandly sexless figurehead of First Lady as something the job rarely allows those women to be–a loving, breathing human being. And she does it brilliantly.”–Entertainment Weekly

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23 .) Witchmark by C.L. Polk

Lists It Appears On:

  • Barnes & Noble
  • Book Riot

C. L. Polk arrives on the scene with Witchmark, a stunning, addictive fantasy that combines intrigue, magic, betrayal, and romance. In an original world reminiscent of Edwardian England in the shadow of a World War, cabals of noble families use their unique magical gifts to control the fates of nations, while one young man seeks only to live a life of his own. Magic marked Miles Singer for suffering the day he was born, doomed either to be enslaved to his family’s interest or to be committed to a witches’ asylum. He went to war to escape his destiny and came home a different man, but he couldn’t leave his past behind. The war between Aeland and Laneer leaves men changed, strangers to their friends and family, but even after faking his own death and reinventing himself as a doctor at a cash-strapped veterans’ hospital, Miles can’t hide what he truly is. When a fatally poisoned patient exposes Miles’ healing gift and his witchmark, he must put his anonymity and freedom at risk to investigate his patient’s murder. To find the truth he’ll need to rely on the family he despises, and on the kindness of the most gorgeous man he’s ever seen.

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22 .) Barracoon by Zora Neale Hurston

Lists It Appears On:

  • Book Marks
  • Time
  • Vulture

A major literary event: a never-before-published work from the author of the American classic, Their Eyes Were Watching God which brilliantly illuminates the horror and injustices of slavery as it tells the true story of the last known survivor of the Atlantic slave trade—illegally smuggled from Africa on the last “Black Cargo” ship to arrive in the United States. In 1927, Zora Neale Hurston went to Plateau, Alabama, to interview ninety-five-year-old Cudjo Lewis. Of the millions of men, women, and children transported from Africa to America as slaves, Cudjo was then the only person alive to tell the story of this integral part of the nation’s history. Hurston was there to record Cudjo’s firsthand account of the raid that led to his capture and bondage fifty years after the Atlantic slave trade was outlawed in the United States. In 1931, Hurston returned to Plateau, the African-centric community three miles from Mobile founded by Cudjo and other former slaves from his ship. Spending more than three months there, she talked in depth with Cudjo about the details of his life. During those weeks, the young writer and the elderly formerly enslaved man ate peaches and watermelon that grew in the backyard and talked about Cudjo’s past—memories from his childhood in Africa, the horrors of being captured and held in a barracoon for selection by American slavers, the harrowing experience of the Middle Passage packed with more than 100 other souls aboard the Clotilde, and the years he spent in slavery until the end of the Civil War. Based on those interviews, featuring Cudjo’s unique vernacular, and written from Hurston’s perspective with the compassion and singular style that have made her one of the preeminent American authors of the twentieth-century, Barracoon brilliantly illuminates the tragedy of slavery and one life forever defined by it. Offering insight into the pernicious legacy that continues to haunt us all, black and white, this poignant and powerful work is an invaluable contribution to our shared history and culture.

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21 .) How To Write An Autobiographical Novel by Alexander Chee

Lists It Appears On:

  • AV Club
  • Book Marks
  • Book Riot

From the author of The Queen of the Night, an essay collection exploring his education as a man, writer, and activist—and how we form our identities in life and in art. As a novelist, Alexander Chee has been described as “masterful” by Roxane Gay, “incendiary” by the New York Times, and “brilliant” by the Washington Post. With How to Write an Autobiographical Novel, his first collection of nonfiction, he’s sure to secure his place as one of the finest essayists of his generation as well. How to Write an Autobiographical Novel is the author’s manifesto on the entangling of life, literature, and politics, and how the lessons learned from a life spent reading and writing fiction have changed him. In these essays, he grows from student to teacher, reader to writer, and reckons with his identities as a son, a gay man, a Korean American, an artist, an activist, a lover, and a friend. He examines some of the most formative experiences of his life and the nation’s history, including his father’s death, the AIDS crisis, 9/11, the jobs that supported his writing—Tarot-reading, bookselling, cater-waiting for William F. Buckley—the writing of his first novel, Edinburgh, and the election of Donald Trump. By turns commanding, heartbreaking, and wry, How to Write an Autobiographical Novel asks questions about how we create ourselves in life and in art, and how to fight when our dearest truths are under attack.

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20 .) Semiosis by Sue Burke

Lists It Appears On:

  • Barnes & Noble
  • Joseph Mallozzi
  • Thrillist

In this character driven novel of first contact by debut author Sue Burke, human survival hinges on an bizarre alliance. Only mutual communication can forge an alliance with the planet’s sentient species and prove that mammals are more than tools. Forced to land on a planet they aren’t prepared for, human colonists rely on their limited resources to survive. The planet provides a lush but inexplicable landscape–trees offer edible, addictive fruit one day and poison the next, while the ruins of an alien race are found entwined in the roots of a strange plant. Conflicts between generations arise as they struggle to understand one another and grapple with an unknowable alien intellect.

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19 .) The Feather Thief: Beauty, Obsession, and the Natural History Heist of the Century by Kirk Wallace Johnson

Lists It Appears On:

  • Amazon
  • Book Riot
  • Working Mother

A rollicking true-crime adventure and a thought-provoking exploration of the human drive to possess natural beauty for readers of The Stranger in the Woods, The Lost City of Z, and The Orchid Thief. On a cool June evening in 2009, after performing a concert at London’s Royal Academy of Music, twenty-year-old American flautist Edwin Rist boarded a train for a suburban outpost of the British Museum of Natural History. Home to one of the largest ornithological collections in the world, the Tring museum was full of rare bird specimens whose gorgeous feathers were worth staggering amounts of money to the men who shared Edwin’s obsession: the Victorian art of salmon fly-tying. Once inside the museum, the champion fly-tier grabbed hundreds of bird skins–some collected 150 years earlier by a contemporary of Darwin’s, Alfred Russel Wallace, who’d risked everything to gather them–and escaped into the darkness. Two years later, Kirk Wallace Johnson was waist high in a river in northern New Mexico when his fly-fishing guide told him about the heist. He was soon consumed by the strange case of the feather thief. What would possess a person to steal dead birds? Had Edwin paid the price for his crime? What became of the missing skins? In his search for answers, Johnson was catapulted into a years-long, worldwide investigation. The gripping story of a bizarre and shocking crime, and one man’s relentless pursuit of justice, The Feather Thief is also a fascinating exploration of obsession, and man’s destructive instinct to harvest the beauty of nature.

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18 .) The Female Persuasion by Meg Woltzer

Lists It Appears On:

  • Book Marks
  • Chapters
  • Novel Visits

Greer Kadetsky is a shy college freshman when she meets the woman she hopes will change her life. Faith Frank, dazzlingly persuasive and elegant at sixty-three, has been a central pillar of the women’s movement for decades, a figure who inspires others to influence the world. Upon hearing Faith speak for the first time, Greer–madly in love with her boyfriend, Cory, but still full of longing for an ambition that she can’t quite place–feels her inner world light up. Then, astonishingly, Faith invites Greer to make something out of that sense of purpose, leading Greer down the most exciting path of her life as it winds toward and away from her meant-to-be love story with Cory and the future she’d always imagined.

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17 .) The Friend by Sigrid Nunez

Lists It Appears On:

  • Book Marks
  • Book Riot
  • Joseph Mallozzi

A moving story of love, friendship, grief, healing, and the magical bond between a woman and her dog. When a woman unexpectedly loses her lifelong best friend and mentor, she finds herself burdened with the unwanted dog he has left behind. Her own battle against grief is intensified by the mute suffering of the dog, a huge Great Dane traumatized by the inexplicable disappearance of its master, and by the threat of eviction: dogs are prohibited in her apartment building. While others worry that grief has made her a victim of magical thinking, the woman refuses to be separated from the dog except for brief periods of time. Isolated from the rest of the world, increasingly obsessed with the dog’s care, determined to read its mind and fathom its heart, she comes dangerously close to unraveling. But while troubles abound, rich and surprising rewards lie in store for both of them.

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16 .) The Mars Room by Rachel Kushner

Lists It Appears On:

  • Book Marks
  • EW
  • News Week

It’s 2003 and Romy Hall is at the start of two consecutive life sentences at Stanville Women’s Correctional Facility, deep in California’s Central Valley. Outside is the world from which she has been severed: the San Francisco of her youth and her young son, Jackson. Inside is a new reality: thousands of women hustling for the bare essentials needed to survive; the bluffing and pageantry and casual acts of violence by guards and prisoners alike; and the deadpan absurdities of institutional living, which Kushner evokes with great humor and precision.

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15 .) The Word is Murder by Anthony Horowitz

Lists It Appears On:

  • News Week
  • The Real Book Spy
  • The Savvy Reader

She planned her own funeral–but did she arrange her murder? A wealthy woman strangled six hours after she’s arranged her own funeral. A very private detective uncovering secrets but hiding his own. A reluctant author drawn into a story he can’t control. What do they have in common? Unexpected death, an unsolved mystery and a trail of bloody clues lie at the heart of Anthony Horowitz’s page-turning new thriller.

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14 .) There There by Tommy Orange

Lists It Appears On:

  • Amazon
  • Book Riot
  • Working Mother

Fierce, angry, funny, heartbreaking—Tommy Orange’s first novel is a wondrous and shattering portrait of an America few of us have ever seen, and it introduces a brilliant new author at the start of a major career. There There is a relentlessly paced multigenerational story about violence and recovery, memory and identity, and the beauty and despair woven into the history of a nation and its people. It tells the story of twelve characters, each of whom have private reasons for traveling to the Big Oakland Powwow. Jacquie Red Feather is newly sober and trying to make it back to the family she left behind in shame. Dene Oxendene is pulling his life back together after his uncle’s death and has come to work at the powwow to honor his uncle’s memory. Opal Viola Victoria Bear Shield has come to watch her nephew Orvil, who has taught himself traditional Indian dance through YouTube videos and has come to the powwow to dance in public for the very first time. There will be glorious communion, and a spectacle of sacred tradition and pageantry. And there will be sacrifice, and heroism, and unspeakable loss. Here is a voice we have never heard—a voice full of poetry and rage, exploding onto the page with stunning urgency and force. Tommy Orange writes of the plight of the urban Native American, the Native American in the city, in a stunning novel that grapples with a complex and painful history, with an inheritance of beauty and profound spirituality, and with a plague of addiction, abuse, and suicide. An unforgettable debut, destined to become required reading in schools and universities across the country.

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13 .) Asymmetry by Lisa Halliday

Lists It Appears On:

  • Book Marks
  • EW
  • Nylon
  • Vulture

A singularly inventive and unforgettable debut novel about love, luck, and the inextricability of life and art, from 2017 Whiting Award winner Lisa Halliday. Told in three distinct and uniquely compelling sections, Asymmetry explores the imbalances that spark and sustain many of our most dramatic human relations: inequities in age, power, talent, wealth, fame, geography, and justice. The first section, “Folly,” tells the story of Alice, a young American editor, and her relationship with the famous and much older writer Ezra Blazer. A tender and exquisite account of an unexpected romance that takes place in New York during the early years of the Iraq War, “Folly” also suggests an aspiring novelist’s coming-of-age. By contrast, “Madness” is narrated by Amar, an Iraqi-American man who, on his way to visit his brother in Kurdistan, is detained by immigration officers and spends the last weekend of 2008 in a holding room in Heathrow. These two seemingly disparate stories gain resonance as their perspectives interact and overlap, with yet new implications for their relationship revealed in an unexpected coda. A stunning debut from a rising literary star, Asymmetry is an urgent, important, and truly original work that will captivate any reader while also posing arresting questions about the very nature of fiction itself.

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12 .) Children of Blood and Bone (Legacy of Orisha) by Tomi Adeyemi

Lists It Appears On:

  • Amazon
  • Book Riot
  • Ravenous Forest Reads
  • Working Mother

“Zélie Adebola remembers when the soil of Orïsha hummed with magic. Burners ignited flames, Tiders beckoned waves, and Zélie’s Reaper mother summoned forth souls.

But everything changed the night magic disappeared. Under the orders of a ruthless king, maji were killed, leaving Zélie without a mother and her people without hope.

Now Zélie has one chance to bring back magic and strike against the monarchy. With the help of a rogue princess, Zélie must outwit and outrun the crown prince, who is hell-bent on eradicating magic for good.”

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11 .) Heart Berries by Terese Marie Mailhot

Lists It Appears On:

  • Book Riot
  • Nylon
  • Thrillist
  • Time

Heart Berries is a powerful, poetic memoir of a woman’s coming of age on the Seabird Island Indian Reservation in the Pacific Northwest. Having survived a profoundly dysfunctional upbringing only to find herself hospitalized and facing a dual diagnosis of post traumatic stress disorder and bipolar II disorder; Terese Marie Mailhot is given a notebook and begins to write her way out of trauma. The triumphant result is Heart Berries, a memorial for Mailhot’s mother, a social worker and activist who had a thing for prisoners; a story of reconciliation with her father―an abusive drunk and a brilliant artist―who was murdered under mysterious circumstances; and an elegy on how difficult it is to love someone while dragging the long shadows of shame. Mailhot trusts the reader to understand that memory isn’t exact, but melded to imagination, pain, and what we can bring ourselves to accept. Her unique and at times unsettling voice graphically illustrates her mental state. As she writes, she discovers her own true voice, seizes control of her story, and, in so doing, reestablishes her connection to her family, to her people, and to her place in the world.

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10 .) The Line Becomes a River: Dispatches from the Border by Francisco Cantú

Lists It Appears On:

  • Amazon
  • Book Marks
  • Time
  • Working Mother

For Francisco Cantú, the border is in the blood: his mother, a park ranger and daughter of a Mexican immigrant, raised him in the scrublands of the Southwest. Haunted by the landscape of his youth, Cantú joins the Border Patrol. He and his partners are posted to remote regions crisscrossed by drug routes and smuggling corridors, where they learn to track other humans under blistering sun and through frigid nights. They haul in the dead and deliver to detention those they find alive. Cantú tries not to think where the stories go from there. Plagued by nightmares, he abandons the Patrol for civilian life. But when an immigrant friend travels to Mexico to visit his dying mother and does not return, Cantú discovers that the border has migrated with him, and now he must know the whole story. Searing and unforgettable, The Line Becomes a River makes urgent and personal the violence our border wreaks on both sides of the line.

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9 .) The Recovering by Leslie Jamison

Lists It Appears On:

  • Book Marks
  • EW
  • Thrillist
  • Time

By the New York Times bestselling author of THE EMPATHY EXAMS, an exploration of addiction, and the stories we tell about it, that reinvents the traditional recovery memoir. With its deeply personal and seamless blend of memoir, cultural history, literary criticism, and journalistic reportage, The Recovering turns our understanding of the traditional addiction narrative on its head, demonstrating that the story of recovery can be every bit as electrifying as the train wreck itself. Leslie Jamison deftly excavates the stories we tell about addiction–both her own and others’–and examines what we want these stories to do, and what happens when they fail us. All the while, she offers a fascinating look at the larger history of the recovery movement, and at the literary and artistic geniuses whose lives and works were shaped by alcoholism and substance dependence, including John Berryman, Jean Rhys, Raymond Carver, Billie Holiday, David Foster Wallace, and Denis Johnson, as well as brilliant figures lost to obscurity but newly illuminated here. For the power of her striking language and the sharpness of her piercing observations, Jamison has been compared to such iconic writers as Joan Didion and Susan Sontag. Yet her utterly singular voice also offers something new. With enormous empathy and wisdom, Jamison has given us nothing less than the story of addiction and recovery in America writ large, a definitive and revelatory account that will resonate for years to come.

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8 .) An American Marriage by Tayari Jones

Lists It Appears On:

  • Book Riot
  • Joseph Mallozzi
  • Nylon
  • The Savvy Reader
  • Thrillist

Newlyweds Celestial and Roy are the embodiment of both the American Dream and the New South. He is a young executive, and she is an artist on the brink of an exciting career. But as they settle into the routine of their life together, they are ripped apart by circumstances neither could have imagined. Roy is arrested and sentenced to twelve years for a crime Celestial knows he didn’t commit. Though fiercely independent, Celestial finds herself bereft and unmoored, taking comfort in Andre, her childhood friend, and best man at their wedding. As Roy’s time in prison passes, she is unable to hold on to the love that has been her center. After five years, Roy’s conviction is suddenly overturned, and he returns to Atlanta ready to resume their life together.

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7 .) The Immortalists by Chloe Benjamin

Lists It Appears On:

  • Amazon
  • Book Marks
  • EW
  • News Week
  • Working Mother

If you were told the date of your death, how would it shape your present? It’s 1969 in New York City’s Lower East Side, and word has spread of the arrival of a mystical woman, a traveling psychic who claims to be able to tell anyone the day they will die. The Gold children—four adolescents on the cusp of self-awareness—sneak out to hear their fortunes. Their prophecies inform their next five decades. Golden-boy Simon escapes to the West Coast, searching for love in ’80s San Francisco; dreamy Klara becomes a Las Vegas magician, obsessed with blurring reality and fantasy; eldest son Daniel seeks security as an army doctor post-9/11, hoping to control fate; and bookish Varya throws herself into longevity research, where she tests the boundary between science and immortality.

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6 .) The Largesse of the Sea Maiden by Denis Johnson

Lists It Appears On:

  • Amazon
  • AV Club
  • Book Marks
  • EW
  • Vulture

The Largesse of the Sea Maiden is the long-awaited new story collection from Denis Johnson. It follows the groundbreaking, highly acclaimed Jesus’ Son. Written in the same luminous prose, this collection finds Johnson in new territory, contemplating old age, mortality, the ghosts of the past, and the elusive and unexpected ways the mysteries of the universe assert themselves. Finished shortly before Johnson’s death in May 2017, this collection is the last word from a writer whose work will live on for many years to come.

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5 .) You Think It, I’ll Say It by Curtis Sittenfeld

Lists It Appears On:

  • Amazon
  • Chapters
  • News Week
  • Readings
  • Thrillist

A suburban mother of two fantasizes about the downfall of an old friend whose wholesome lifestyle empire may or may not be built on a lie. A high-powered lawyer honeymooning with her husband is caught off guard by the appearance of the girl who tormented her in high school. A shy Ivy League student learns the truth about a classmate’s seemingly enviable life. Curtis Sittenfeld has established a reputation as a sharp chronicler of the modern age who humanizes her subjects even as she skewers them. Now, with this first collection of short fiction, her “astonishing gift for creating characters that take up residence in readers’ heads” (The Washington Post) is showcased like never before. Throughout the ten stories in You Think It, I’ll Say It, Sittenfeld upends assumptions about class, relationships, and gender roles in a nation that feels both adrift and viscerally divided. With moving insight and uncanny precision, Curtis Sittenfeld pinpoints the questionable decisions, missed connections, and sometimes extraordinary coincidences that make up a life. Indeed, she writes what we’re all thinking—if only we could express it with the wit of a master satirist, the storytelling gifts of an old-fashioned raconteur, and the vision of an American original.

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4 .) Circe by Madeline Miller

Lists It Appears On:

  • Amazon
  • Book Riot
  • EW
  • Novel Visits
  • Nylon
  • Thrillist

In the house of Helios, god of the sun and mightiest of the Titans, a daughter is born. But Circe is a strange child—not powerful, like her father, nor viciously alluring like her mother. Turning to the world of mortals for companionship, she discovers that she does possess power—the power of witchcraft, which can transform rivals into monsters and menace the gods themselves. Threatened, Zeus banishes her to a deserted island, where she hones her occult craft, tames wild beasts and crosses paths with many of the most famous figures in all of mythology, including the Minotaur, Daedalus and his doomed son Icarus, the murderous Medea, and, of course, wily Odysseus. But there is danger, too, for a woman who stands alone, and Circe unwittingly draws the wrath of both men and gods, ultimately finding herself pitted against one of the most terrifying and vengeful of the Olympians. To protect what she loves most, Circe must summon all her strength and choose, once and for all, whether she belongs with the gods she is born from, or the mortals she has come to love.

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3 .) The Woman in the Window by A.J. Finn

Lists It Appears On:

  • Amazon
  • Joseph Mallozzi
  • News Week
  • She Reads
  • The Savvy Reader
  • Working Mother

Anna Fox lives alone—a recluse in her New York City home, unable to venture outside. She spends her day drinking wine (maybe too much), watching old movies, recalling happier times . . . and spying on her neighbors. Then the Russells move into the house across the way: a father, a mother, their teenage son. The perfect family. But when Anna, gazing out her window one night, sees something she shouldn’t, her world begins to crumble—and its shocking secrets are laid bare. What is real? What is imagined? Who is in danger? Who is in control? In this diabolically gripping thriller, no one—and nothing—is what it seems.

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2 .) Educated: A Memoir by Tara Westover

Lists It Appears On:

  • Amazon
  • Book Riot
  • News Week
  • Readings
  • The Savvy Reader
  • Time
  • Working Mother

An unforgettable memoir in the tradition of The Glass Castle about a young girl who, kept out of school, leaves her survivalist family and goes on to earn a PhD from Cambridge University Tara Westover was 17 the first time she set foot in a classroom. Born to survivalists in the mountains of Idaho, she prepared for the end of the world by stockpiling home-canned peaches and sleeping with her “head-for-the-hills bag”. In the summer she stewed herbs for her mother, a midwife and healer, and in the winter she salvaged in her father’s junkyard. Her father forbade hospitals, so Tara never saw a doctor or nurse. Gashes and concussions, even burns from explosions, were all treated at home with herbalism. The family was so isolated from mainstream society that there was no one to ensure the children received an education and no one to intervene when one of Tara’s older brothers became violent. Then, lacking any formal education, Tara began to educate herself. She taught herself enough mathematics and grammar to be admitted to Brigham Young University, where she studied history, learning for the first time about important world events like the Holocaust and the civil rights movement. Her quest for knowledge transformed her, taking her over oceans and across continents, to Harvard and to Cambridge. Only then would she wonder if she’d traveled too far, if there was still a way home. Educated is an account of the struggle for self-invention. It is a tale of fierce family loyalty and of the grief that comes with severing the closest of ties. With the acute insight that distinguishes all great writers, Westover has crafted a universal coming-of-age story that gets to the heart of what an education is and what it offers: the perspective to see one’s life through new eyes and the will to change it.

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1 .) I’ll Be Gone in the Dark by Michelle McNamara

Lists It Appears On:

  • Amazon
  • Book Marks
  • Book Riot
  • EW
  • News Week
  • Readings
  • The Savvy Reader

A masterful true crime account of the Golden State Killer—the elusive serial rapist turned murderer who terrorized California for over a decade—from Michelle McNamara, the gifted journalist who died tragically while investigating the case. “You’ll be silent forever, and I’ll be gone in the dark.” For more than ten years, a mysterious and violent predator committed fifty sexual assaults in Northern California before moving south, where he perpetrated ten sadistic murders. Then he disappeared, eluding capture by multiple police forces and some of the best detectives in the area. Three decades later, Michelle McNamara, a true crime journalist who created the popular website TrueCrimeDiary.com, was determined to find the violent psychopath she called “the Golden State Killer.” Michelle pored over police reports, interviewed victims, and embedded herself in the online communities that were as obsessed with the case as she was. At the time of the crimes, the Golden State Killer was between the ages of eighteen and thirty, Caucasian, and athletic—capable of vaulting tall fences. He always wore a mask. After choosing a victim—he favored suburban couples—he often entered their home when no one was there, studying family pictures, mastering the layout. He attacked while they slept, using a flashlight to awaken and blind them. Though they could not recognize him, his victims recalled his voice: a guttural whisper through clenched teeth, abrupt and threatening. I’ll Be Gone in the Dark—the masterpiece McNamara was writing at the time of her sudden death—offers an atmospheric snapshot of a moment in American history and a chilling account of a criminal mastermind and the wreckage he left behind. It is also a portrait of a woman’s obsession and her unflagging pursuit of the truth. Framed by an introduction by Gillian Flynn and an afterword by her husband, Patton Oswalt, the book was completed by Michelle’s lead researcher and a close colleague. Utterly original and compelling, it is destined to become a true crime classic—and may at last unmask the Golden State Killer.

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The 200+ Additional Best Books of 2018



 

# Book Author Lists
(Titles Appear On 1 List Each)
49 12 Rules for Life Jordan Peterson
Alex And Books
50
A Big Ship at the Edge of the Universe
Barnes & Noble
51 A COURT OF MIST AND FURY Sarah J. Maas
Ravenous Forest Reads
52 A COURT OF THORNS AND ROSES Sarah J. Maas
Ravenous Forest Reads
53 A Higher Loyalty: Truth, Lies, and Leadership, James Comey News Week
54 A Map of the Dark
Joseph Mallozzi
55 A Naturalist at Large: The Best Essays of Bernd Heinrich, Bernd Heinrich News Week
56 A Sharp Solitude
The Real Book Spy
57 After Anna
The Real Book Spy
58 Agent in Place
The Real Book Spy
59 American Histories John Edgar Wideman Vulture
60 American Panda Gloria Chao
The Young Folks
61
And Now We Have Everything: On Motherhood Before I Was Ready
Thrillist
62 Arrowood Laura McHugh Owlcation
63 Aru Shah and the End of Time Book Riot
64 Ayesha At Last
The Savvy Reader
65
Bachelor Girl: A Novel by the Author of Orphan…
Chapters
66 Back Talk Thrillist
67 Barbed Wire Heart
Joseph Mallozzi
68 Before Mars
Barnes & Noble
69 Belly Up Nylon
70 Beneath the Sugar Sky Thrillist
71 Bingo Love Book Riot
72 Binti: The Night Masquerade Book Riot
73 Black Hammer’s
Joseph Mallozzi
74 Black No More, George S. Schuyler News Week
75 Blackfish City
Barnes & Noble
76 Blood of Assassins
Joseph Mallozzi
77 Blood Water Paint Book Riot
78 Boom! Deciphering Innovation: How Disruption Drives Companies to Transform or Die Lisa Hendrickson and Jim Colwick Inc.
79
Brazen: Rebel Ladies Who Rocked the World
Book Riot
80 Brown Book Marks
81 Bury What We Cannot
Joseph Mallozzi
82 Call Me Zebra Nylon
83
Captive Audience: On Love and Reality TV
Thrillist
84 Census Nylon
85 Cenzontle Book Marks
86 Chasing New Horizons: Inside the Epic First Mission to Pluto, Alan Stern and David Grinspoon News Week
87 City of Devils, Paul French News Week
88 Close to Home Cara Hunter Owlcation
89 Closer Than You Know
The Real Book Spy
90 Cult X Book Riot
91
Cyanide & Happiness: A Guide to Parenting by Three Guys with No Kids
Joseph Mallozzi
92 Darwin Comes to Town, Menno Schilthuizen News Week
93 Dear Madam President Jennifer Palmieri Time
94 Dinner at the Center of the Earth, Nathan Englander News Week
95
Doctor Star & the Kingdom of Lost Tomorrows
Joseph Mallozzi
96 Dolores Claiborne Stephen King Owlcation
97 Dread Nation Book Riot
98 Drum Roll, Please Book Riot
99 Eggshell Skull Readings
100
Eloquent Rage: A Black Feminist Discovers Her Superpower
Book Riot
101 Embers of War
Barnes & Noble
102 Everything Here is Beautiful Novel Visits
103 Extreme Ownership Willink & Babin
Alex And Books
104 Eye Level Book Marks
105 Field of Valor
The Real Book Spy
106 Fire Dance: A Novel
Barnes & Noble
107 Fluid: How Culture, Hidden Opportunities, and Flatter Structures Lead to Profitable Innovation Najeeb Khan Inc.
108 Frankenstein: The 1818 Text Mary Shelley AV Club
109 Gale Force
The Real Book Spy
110
Gods, Monsters, and the Lucky Peach
Barnes & Noble
111 Good Me, Bad Me
Joseph Mallozzi
112 Greeks Bearing Gifts
The Real Book Spy
113 Grey Sister
Barnes & Noble
114 Harry Potter and the Goblet of Fire J.K Rowling Owlcation
115 Hellbent
The Real Book Spy
116 How Democracies Die, Steven Levitsky and Daniel Ziblatt News Week
117 How to Change Your Mind Michael Pollan Time
118
How to Change Your Mind: What the New Science of Psychedelics Teaches Us About Consciousness, Dying, Addiction, Depression, and Transcendence
Amazon
119 How To Stop Time
The Savvy Reader
120 Hurts to Love You Thrillist
121
I’ve Been Meaning To Tell You: A Letter To My…
Chapters
122 In the Garden of the Fugitives Readings
123 In the Shadow of Statues: A White Southerner Confronts History, Mitch Landrieu News Week
124 in the Window
The Real Book Spy
125 Innovation Nation: The Hidden Truth of How the Government Drives Change Taylor Fitzgerald Inc.
126 Inseparable: The Original Siamese Twins and Their Rendezvous with American History, Yunte Huang News Week
127 Into the Black Nowhere
The Real Book Spy
128 Invitation to a Bonfire Nylon
129
Iron Gold (Red Rising Series #4)
Barnes & Noble
130 Journey Into Europe: Islam, Immigration, and Identity, Akbar Ahmed News Week
131 Joyland Stephen King Owlcation
132 Just the Funny Parts, Nell Scovell News Week
133
Lands Of Lost Borders: Out Of Bounds On The…
Chapters
134 Leah on the Offbeat Book Riot
135 Legendary Stephanie Garber
The Young Folks
136 Less Readings
137 Liar’s Candle
The Real Book Spy
138 Light it Up
The Real Book Spy
139
Little Black Book: The Sunday Times Bestseller
Chapters
140 London Rules, Mick Herron News Week
141 Love and Ruin: A Novel Amazon
142 Magpie Murders
The Savvy Reader
143 Man’s Search for Meaning Viktor Frankl
Alex And Books
144
Master Assassins: The Fire Sacraments, Book One
Barnes & Noble
145 Medusa Uploaded: A Novel
Barnes & Noble
146 Motherhood Sheila Heti Vulture
147 Munich
The Real Book Spy
148 My Boyfriend Is a Bear
Joseph Mallozzi
149 My Dead Parents, Anya Yurchyshyn News Week
150 My Name Is Nathan Lucius, Mark Winkler News Week
151 Natural Causes, Barbara Ehrenreich News Week
152 Need to Know
The Real Book Spy
153 Neon in Daylight Nylon
154 Neverworld Wake Book Riot
155 Next Year in Havana Book Riot
156 No Turning Back: Life, Loss, and Hope in Syria, Rania Abouzeid News Week
157 Not Here Book Marks
158 Not That Bad
The Savvy Reader
159 Obsidio Amie Kaufman and Jay Kristoff
The Young Folks
160 Our Kind of Cruelty: A Novel Chapters
161 Overkill
The Real Book Spy
162 Passing, Nella Larsen News Week
163 Phone Will Self Vulture
164 Picture Us in the Light Book Riot
165 Poison
The Real Book Spy
166
Police at the Station and They Don’t Look Friendly
Joseph Mallozzi
167 Pure Hollywood Christine Schutt Vulture
168 Quirky: The Remarkable Story of the Traits, Foibles, and Genius of Breakthrough Innovators Who Changed the World Melissa A. Schilling Inc.
169 Reaper: Ghost Target
The Real Book Spy
170 Red Clocks Book Riot
171 Red Queen
The Savvy Reader
172
Revenant Gun (Machineries of Empire Series #3)
Barnes & Noble
173
Robert B. Parker’s Old Black Magic
The Real Book Spy
174 Robicheaux
The Real Book Spy
175 Russian Roulette: The Inside Story of Putin’s War on America and the Election of Donald Trump, Michael Isikoff and David Corn News Week
176 Scorpion Strike
The Real Book Spy
177 Second Strike
The Real Book Spy
178 Sharp: The Women Who Made an Art of Having an Opinion, Michelle Dean News Week
179
Shrewed: A Wry and Closely Observed Look at…
Chapters
180 Simon vs the Homo Sapiens Agenda Becky Albertalli Owlcation
181 Sister of Mine
The Savvy Reader
182 Six Four, Hideo Yokoyama News Week
183 Skyjack
The Real Book Spy
184
So You Want To Talk About Race
Book Riot
185 Some Trick Helen DeWitt Vulture
186 Song of a Captive Bird, Jasmin Darznik News Week
187 Space Odyssey: Stanley Kubrick, Arthur C. Clarke, and the Making of a Masterpiece, Michael Benson News Week
188 Space Opera
Barnes & Noble
189 Spider-Men II
Joseph Mallozzi
190 Starless
Barnes & Noble
191 Still Me Jojo Moyes She Reads
192 Sustainable Growth and Profits: Managing Your Innovation Strategy, Organization, and Initiatives Magnus Penker Inc.
193 Tangerine, Christine Mangan News Week
194 Tell Me More Novel Visits
195 Tess of the Road Book Riot
196
Text Me When You Get Home: The Evolution and Triumph of Modern Female Friendship
Book Riot
197 That Time I Loved You
The Savvy Reader
198 The Armored Saint
Joseph Mallozzi
199 The Astonishing Color of After Book Riot
200 The Beekeeper: Rescuing the Stolen Women of Iraq, Dunya Mikhail News Week
201 The Belles Book Riot
202 The Bishop’s Pawn
The Real Book Spy
203 The Bomb Maker
Joseph Mallozzi
204 The Book of Essie Novel Visits
205 The Book of M
The Savvy Reader
206 The Book Thief Markus Zusak Owlcation
207
The Bookshop of the Broken Hearted
Readings
208 The Broken Girls Simone St. James She Reads
209 The Chalk Man C.J. Tudor Owlcation
210 The Comedown Book Riot
211 THE CRUEL PRINCE Holly Black
Ravenous Forest Reads
212 The Disappeared
The Real Book Spy
213 The Dutch Wife
The Savvy Reader
214 The Elizas
The Real Book Spy
215 The Ensemble Book Riot
216 The Escape Artist
The Real Book Spy
217 The Fallen
The Real Book Spy
218 The Freeze-Frame Revolution
Barnes & Noble
219 The Girls Emma Cline Owlcation
220 The Gone World Tom Sweterlitsch AV Club
221 The Gray Ghost
The Real Book Spy
222 The Great Believers Novel Visits
223 The Grey Bastards
Barnes & Noble
224 The Gunners Novel Visits
225 The Hazel Wood Book Riot
226 The Hellfire Club
The Real Book Spy
227 The Home For Unwanted Girls
The Savvy Reader
228 The House of Broken Angels, Luis Alberto Urrea News Week
229
The House of Impossible Beauties
Thrillist
230 The Kiss Quotient Book Riot
231 The Kremlin Conspiracy
The Real Book Spy
232 The Kremlin’s Candidate
The Real Book Spy
233 The Last Sun
Barnes & Noble
234 The Lean Strategy: Using Lean to Create Competitive Advantage, Unleash Innovation, and Deliver Sustainable Growth Michael Ballé, Daniel Jones & Jacques Chaize Inc.
235
The Lost Girls of Camp Forevermore
Book Riot
236
The Measure Of My Powers: A Memoir Of Food,…
Chapters
237
The Merry Spinster: Tales of Everyday Horror
Book Riot
238 The Monk of Mokha Book Marks
239 The New Science of Radical Innovation: The Six Competencies Leaders Need to Win in a Complex World Sunnie Giles Inc.
240 The Nowhere Child Readings
241 The ONE Thing Keller & Papasan
Alex And Books
242
The Only Harmless Great Thing
Barnes & Noble
243 The Oracle Year: A Novel
Barnes & Noble
244 The Overstory: A Novel Amazon
245 The People vs. Democracy: Why Our Freedom Is in Danger & How to Save It, Yascha Mounk News Week
246 The Perfect Mother
The Real Book Spy
247 The Pisces Thrillist
248 The Poppy War
Barnes & Noble
249 The Power, Naomi Alderman News Week
250
The Prince and the Dressmaker
Book Riot
251
The Punishment She Deserves: A Lynley Novel
Chapters
252 The Race to Save the Romanovs: The Truth Behind the Secret Plans to Rescue the Russian Imperial Family, Helen Rappaport News Week
253 The Real Michael Swann
The Real Book Spy
254 The Rig
Barnes & Noble
255 The Road to Unfreedom Timothy Snyder Time
256 The Ruined House, Ruby Namdar News Week
257 The Second O of Sorrow Book Marks
258 The Sixth Day
The Real Book Spy
259 The Terminal List
The Real Book Spy
260 The Third Door Alex Banayan
Alex And Books
261 The Truth about the Harry Quebert Affair Joel Dicker Owlcation
262 The Way I Die
The Real Book Spy
263 The Wedding Date Book Riot
264 The Woman
The Real Book Spy
265
The World Only Spins Forward: The Ascent of Angels in America
Thrillist
266
They Knew What They Wanted: Collages and Poems
Book Marks
267 TIFFANY SLY LIVES HERE NOW Dana L. Davis
Ravenous Forest Reads
268
Time Pieces: A Dublin Memoir, By John Banville
News Week
269 Tin Man Novel Visits
270 Tom Clancy Line of Sight
The Real Book Spy
271 Tonight I’m Someone Else Nylon
272 Too Close to Breathe Olivia Kiernan She Reads
273 Trail of Lightning
Barnes & Noble
274 Trip: Psychedelics, Alienation, and Change Tao Lin Vulture
275 Twilight of the Gods: A Journey to the End of Classic Rock, Steven Hyden News Week
276 Twisted Prey
The Real Book Spy
277 Tyrant Stephen Greenblatt Time
278 Us Against You Novel Visits
279 Verizon Untethered Ivan Seidenberg & Scott McMurray Inc.
280 Wade in the Water Book Marks
281 War Storm
The Savvy Reader
282 Warning Light
The Real Book Spy
283 We’ll Fly Away
Joseph Mallozzi
284 What Would the Great Economists Do, Linda Yueh News Week
285
When Einstein Walked with Gödel: Excursions to the Edge of Thought
Thrillist
286 WHO IS NOLA BROWN?
The Real Book Spy
287 Who We Are and How We Got Here, David Reich News Week
288 Winter Book Marks
289 Zero Day
The Real Book Spy


24 Best 2018 Book Sources/Lists



Source Article
Alex And Books 5 Best Books of 2018 (so far) — Alex and Books
Amazon Amazon.com: Best Books of the Year So Far: Books
AV Club The A.V. Club’s favorite books of 2018 so far – AUX
Barnes & Noble The Best Science Fiction & Fantasy Books of 2018 So Far
Book Marks The Best Reviewed Books of 2018 (So Far)
Book Riot Best Books So Far 2018
Chapters The Best Books of the Year So Far – Chapters Indigo
EW The 10 best books of 2018 so far
Inc. The Top Innovation Books of 2018 (So Far)
Joseph Mallozzi July 3, 2018: Best Books of 2018 – so far!
News Week The 50 Coolest Hot Weather Reads: 2018’s Best Fiction and Non …
Novel Visits My Favorite Books of 2018 (so far)
Nylon NYLON · These Are The Best Books Of The Year, So Far
Owlcation My Top 10 Books of 2018 (So Far)
Ravenous Forest Reads Best Books I’ve Read In 2018 So Far
Readings Blog: Our favourite books of 2018 (so far) · Readings.com.au
She Reads @artbookscoffee’s favorite books of 2018 (so far) – She Reads
The Real Book Spy The 45 Best Thrillers Released In 2018 So Far – The Real Book Spy
The Savvy Reader Our Favourite Books of the Year (…so far) – The Savvy Reader
The Young Folks The Best Books of 2018 So Far
Thrillist Best Books of 2018 (So Far): Good Books to Read This Year – Thrillist
Time Best Nonfiction Books of 2018 So Far
Vulture The Best Books of the Year (So Far) – Vulture
Working Mother The 10 Best Books of 2018, So Far

 

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