Best 2017, Best Books, Best Year-End, Fiction, Nonfiction

Ranking Of The Best Books Of 2017… So Far – A MIDYEAR LIST AGGREGATION

July 10, 2017

“What are the best books of 2017 (So Far)?” We looked at 306 of the top books of 2017, aggregating and ranking them so we could answer that very question!

As we did last year, we decided to get a jump start on the year-end best book lists and see what the experts (Websites that took the time and effort to make a list) are liking so far this year. It is interesting to compare to the most anticipated list from the beginning of the year and see what books have held up to the anticipation. See also, Last years Anticipated, Mid-Year, and Year-end.

Happy Scrolling!



Top Books Of 2017



37 .) 4 3 2 1: A Novel by Paul Auster

Lists It Appears On:

  • Paste
  • D’Marge
  • Amazon

“Nearly two weeks early, on March 3, 1947, in the maternity ward of Beth Israel Hospital in Newark, New Jersey, Archibald Isaac Ferguson, the one and only child of Rose and Stanley Ferguson, is born. From that single beginning, Ferguson’s life will take four simultaneous and independent fictional paths. Four identical Fergusons made of the same DNA, four boys who are the same boy, go on to lead four parallel and entirely different lives. Family fortunes diverge. Athletic skills and sex lives and friendships and intellectual passions contrast. Each Ferguson falls under the spell of the magnificent Amy Schneiderman, yet each Amy and each Ferguson have a relationship like no other. Meanwhile, readers will take in each Ferguson’s pleasures and ache from each Ferguson’s pains, as the mortal plot of each Ferguson’s life rushes on.

As inventive and dexterously constructed as anything Paul Auster has ever written, yet with a passion for realism and a great tenderness and fierce attachment to history and to life itself that readers have never seen from Auster before. 4 3 2 1 is a marvelous and unforgettably affecting tour de force.”

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36 .) American War by Omar El Akkad

Lists It Appears On:

  • Esquire
  • Bookbub
  • Washington Post

“An audacious and powerful debut novel: a second American Civil War, a devastating plague, and one family caught deep in the middle—a story that asks what might happen if America were to turn its most devastating policies and deadly weapons upon itself.

Sarat Chestnut, born in Louisiana, is only six when the Second American Civil War breaks out in 2074. But even she knows that oil is outlawed, that Louisiana is half underwater, and that unmanned drones fill the sky. When her father is killed and her family is forced into Camp Patience for displaced persons, she begins to grow up shaped by her particular time and place. But not everyone at Camp Patience is who they claim to be. Eventually Sarat is befriended by a mysterious functionary, under whose influence she is turned into a deadly instrument of war. The decisions that she makes will have tremendous consequences not just for Sarat but for her family and her country, rippling through generations of strangers and kin alike.”

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35 .) Flâneuse: Women Walk The City by Lauren Elkin

Lists It Appears On:

  • Paste
  • Refinery 29
  • The AV Club

“The flâneur is the quintessentially masculine figure of privilege and leisure who strides the capitals of the world with abandon. But it is the flâneuse who captures the imagination of the cultural critic Lauren Elkin. In her wonderfully gender-bending new book, the flâneuse is a “determined, resourceful individual keenly attuned to the creative potential of the city and the liberating possibilities of a good walk.” Virginia Woolf called it “street haunting”; Holly Golightly epitomized it in Breakfast at Tiffany’s; and Patti Smith did it in her own inimitable style in 1970s New York.

Part cultural meander, part memoir, Flâneuse takes us on a distinctly cosmopolitan jaunt that begins in New York, where Elkin grew up, and transports us to Paris via Venice, Tokyo, and London, all cities in which she’s lived. We are shown the paths beaten by such flâneuses as the cross-dressing nineteenth-century novelist George Sand, the Parisian artist Sophie Calle, the wartime correspondent Martha Gellhorn, and the writer Jean Rhys. With tenacity and insight, Elkin creates a mosaic of what urban settings have meant to women, charting through literature, art, history, and film the sometimes exhilarating, sometimes fraught relationship that women have with the metropolis.”

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34 .) Idaho by Emily Ruskovich

Lists It Appears On:

  • The AV Club
  • Refinery 29
  • Bookbub

“Ann and Wade have carved out a life for themselves from a rugged landscape in northern Idaho, where they are bound together by more than love. With her husband’s memory fading, Ann attempts to piece together the truth of what happened to Wade’s first wife, Jenny, and to their daughters. In a story written in exquisite prose and told from multiple perspectives—including Ann, Wade, and Jenny, now in prison—we gradually learn of the mysterious and shocking act that fractured Wade and Jenny’s lives, of the love and compassion that brought Ann and Wade together, and of the memories that reverberate through the lives of every character in Idaho.

In a wild emotional and physical landscape, Wade’s past becomes the center of Ann’s imagination, as Ann becomes determined to understand the family she never knew—and to take responsibility for them, reassembling their lives, and her own.”

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33 .) New York 2140 by Kim Stanley Robinson

Lists It Appears On:

  • Barnes & Noble
  • Popular Mechanics
  • D’Marge

“As the sea levels rose, every street became a canal. Every skyscraper an island. For the residents of one apartment building in Madison Square, however, New York in the year 2140 is far from a drowned city.

There is the market trader, who finds opportunities where others find trouble. There is the detective, whose work will never disappear — along with the lawyers, of course.
There is the internet star, beloved by millions for her airship adventures, and the building’s manager, quietly respected for his attention to detail. Then there are two boys who don’t live there, but have no other home– and who are more important to its future than anyone might imagine.

Lastly there are the coders, temporary residents on the roof, whose disappearance triggers a sequence of events that threatens the existence of all– and even the long-hidden foundations on which the city rests.

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32 .) Option B by Sheryl Sandberg, Adam Grant

Lists It Appears On:

  • Washington Post
  • Indigo
  • Amazon

“After the sudden death of her husband, Sheryl Sandberg felt certain that she and her children would never feel pure joy again. “I was in ‘the void,’” she writes, “a vast emptiness that fills your heart and lungs and restricts your ability to think or even breathe.” Her friend Adam Grant, a psychologist at Wharton, told her there are concrete steps people can take to recover and rebound from life-shattering experiences. We are not born with a fixed amount of resilience. It is a muscle that everyone can build.
Option B combines Sheryl’s personal insights with Adam’s eye-opening research on finding strength in the face of adversity. Beginning with the gut-wrenching moment when she finds her husband, Dave Goldberg, collapsed on a gym floor, Sheryl opens up her heart—and her journal—to describe the acute grief and isolation she felt in the wake of his death. But Option B goes beyond Sheryl’s loss to explore how a broad range of people have overcome hardships including illness, job loss, sexual assault, natural disasters, and the violence of war. Their stories reveal the capacity of the human spirit to persevere . . . and to rediscover joy.”

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31 .) Quicksand by Malin Persson Giolito

Lists It Appears On:

  • Amazon
  • Huffington Post
  • Kirkus

“A mass shooting has taken place at a prep school in Stockholm’s wealthiest suburb. Eighteen-year-old Maja Norberg is charged for her involvement in the massacre that left her boyfriend and her best friend dead. She has spent nine months in jail awaiting trial. Now the time has come for her to enter the courtroom. How did Maja—popular, privileged, and a top student—become a cold-blooded killer in the eyes of the public? What did Maja do? Or is it what she failed to do that brought her here?

Quicksand is an incisive courtroom thriller and a drama that raises questions about the nature of love, the disastrous side effects of guilt, and the function of justice.”

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30 .) Strange The Dreamer by Laini Taylor

Lists It Appears On:

  • The Young Folks
  • The AV Club
  • Amazon

“The dream chooses the dreamer, not the other way around–and Lazlo Strange, war orphan and junior librarian, has always feared that his dream chose poorly. Since he was five years old he’s been obsessed with the mythic lost city of Weep, but it would take someone bolder than he to cross half the world in search of it. Then a stunning opportunity presents itself, in the person of a hero called the Godslayer and a band of legendary warriors, and he has to seize his chance to lose his dream forever.
What happened in Weep two hundred years ago to cut it off from the rest of the world? What exactly did the Godslayer slay that went by the name of god? And what is the mysterious problem he now seeks help in solving?

The answers await in Weep, but so do more mysteries–including the blue-skinned goddess who appears in Lazlo’s dreams. How did he dream her before he knew she existed? and if all the gods are dead, why does she seem so real?”

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29 .) The Answers by Catherine Lacey

Lists It Appears On:

  • The AV Club
  • Refinery 29
  • Nylon

“Mary Parsons is broke. Dead broke, really: between an onslaught of medical bills and a mountain of credit card debt, she has been pushed to the brink. Hounded by bill collectors and still plagued by the painful and bizarre symptoms that doctors couldn’t diagnose, Mary seeks relief from a holistic treatment called Pneuma Adaptive Kinesthesia―PAKing, for short. Miraculously, it works. But PAKing is prohibitively expensive. Like so many young adults trying to make ends meet in New York City, Mary scours Craigslist and bulletin boards for a second job, and eventually lands an interview for a high-paying gig that’s even stranger than her symptoms or the New Agey PAKing.

Mary’s new job title is Emotional Girlfriend in the “Girlfriend Experiment”―the brainchild of a wealthy and infamous actor, Kurt Sky, who has hired a team of biotech researchers to solve the problem of how to build and maintain the perfect romantic relationship, cast – ing himself as the experiment’s only constant. Around Kurt, several women orbit as his girlfriends with spe – cific functions. There’s a Maternal Girlfriend who folds his laundry, an Anger Girlfriend who fights with him, a Mundanity Girlfriend who just hangs around his loft, and a whole team of girlfriends to take care of Intimacy. With so little to lose, Mary falls headfirst into Kurt’s messy, ego-driven simulacrum of human connection.

Told in Catherine Lacey’s signature spiraling, hypnotic prose, The Answers is both a mesmerizing dive into the depths of one woman’s psyche and a critical look at the conventions and institutions that infiltrate our most personal, private moments. As Mary struggles to understand herself―her body, her city, the trials of her past, the uncertainty of her future―the reader must confront the impossible questions that fuel Catherine Lacey’s work: How do you measure love? Can you truly know someone else? Do we even know ourselves? And listen for Lacey’s uncanny answers.”

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28 .) The Book of Joan by Lidia Yuknavitch

Lists It Appears On:

  • Esquire
  • Powells
  • Refinery 29

“In the near future, world wars have transformed the earth into a battleground. Fleeing the unending violence and the planet’s now-radioactive surface, humans have regrouped to a mysterious platform known as CIEL, hovering over their erstwhile home. The changed world has turned evolution on its head: the surviving humans have become sexless, hairless, pale-white creatures floating in isolation, inscribing stories upon their skin.

Out of the ranks of the endless wars rises Jean de Men, a charismatic and bloodthirsty cult leader who turns CIEL into a quasi-corporate police state. A group of rebels unite to dismantle his iron rule—galvanized by the heroic song of Joan, a child-warrior who possesses a mysterious force that lives within her and communes with the earth. When de Men and his armies turn Joan into a martyr, the consequences are astonishing. And no one—not the rebels, Jean de Men, or even Joan herself—can foresee the way her story and unique gift will forge the destiny of an entire world for generations.”

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27 .) The Ministry of Utmost Happiness by Arundhati Roy

Lists It Appears On:

  • Washington Post
  • Newsday
  • Amazon

“The Ministry of Utmost Happiness takes us on an intimate journey of many years across the Indian subcontinent—from the cramped neighborhoods of Old Delhi and the roads of the new city to the mountains and valleys of Kashmir and beyond, where war is peace and peace is war.
It is an aching love story and a decisive remonstration, a story told in a whisper, in a shout, through unsentimental tears and sometimes with a bitter laugh. Each of its characters is indelibly, tenderly rendered. Its heroes are people who have been broken by the world they live in and then rescued, patched together by acts of love—and by hope.
The tale begins with Anjum—who used to be Aftab—unrolling a threadbare Persian carpet in a city graveyard she calls home. We encounter the odd, unforgettable Tilo and the men who loved her—including Musa, sweetheart and ex-sweetheart, lover and ex-lover; their fates are as entwined as their arms used to be and always will be. We meet Tilo’s landlord, a former suitor, now an intelligence officer posted to Kabul. And then we meet the two Miss Jebeens: the first a child born in Srinagar and buried in its overcrowded Martyrs’ Graveyard; the second found at midnight, abandoned on a concrete sidewalk in the heart of New Delhi.”

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26 .) The Stranger in the Woods by Michael Finkel

Lists It Appears On:

  • Indigo
  • Paste
  • Parchment Girl

In 1986, a shy and intelligent twenty-year-old named Christopher Knight left his home in Massachusetts, drove to Maine, and disappeared into the forest. He would not have a conversation with another human being until nearly three decades later, when he was arrested for stealing food. Living in a tent even through brutal winters, he had survived by his wits and courage, developing ingenious ways to store edibles and water, and to avoid freezing to death. He broke into nearby cottages for food, clothing, reading material, and other provisions, taking only what he needed but terrifying a community never able to solve the mysterious burglaries. Based on extensive interviews with Knight himself, this is a vividly detailed account of his secluded life—why did he leave? what did he learn?—as well as the challenges he has faced since returning to the world. It is a gripping story of survival that asks fundamental questions about solitude, community, and what makes a good life, and a deeply moving portrait of a man who was determined to live his own way, and succeeded.

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25 .) The Upside of Unrequited by Becky Albertalli

Lists It Appears On:

  • The Young Folks
  • Seventeen
  • Brightly

“Seventeen-year-old Molly Peskin-Suso knows all about unrequited love. No matter how many times her twin sister, Cassie, tells her to woman up, Molly can’t stomach the idea of rejection. So she’s careful. Fat girls always have to be careful.

Then a cute new girl enters Cassie’s orbit, and for the first time ever, Molly’s cynical twin is a lovesick mess. Meanwhile, Molly’s totally not dying of loneliness—except for the part where she is. Luckily, Cassie’s new girlfriend comes with a cute hipster-boy sidekick. If Molly can win him over, she’ll get her first kiss and she’ll get her twin back.
There’s only one problem: Molly’s coworker, Reid. He’s a chubby Tolkien superfan with a season pass to the Ren Faire, and there’s absolutely no way Molly could fall for him.

Right?”

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24 .) We Are Never Meeting in Real Life by Samantha Irby

Lists It Appears On:

  • Esquire
  • Nylon
  • Powells

“Sometimes you just have to laugh, even when life is a dumpster fire.

With We Are Never Meeting in Real Life., “bitches gotta eat” blogger and comedian Samantha Irby turns the serio-comic essay into an art form. Whether talking about how her difficult childhood has led to a problem in making “adult” budgets, explaining why she should be the new Bachelorette—she’s “”35-ish, but could easily pass for 60-something””—detailing a disastrous pilgrimage-slash-romantic-vacation to Nashville to scatter her estranged father’s ashes, sharing awkward sexual encounters, or dispensing advice on how to navigate friendships with former drinking buddies who are now suburban moms—hang in there for the Costco loot—she’s as deft at poking fun at the ghosts of her past self as she is at capturing powerful emotional truths.”

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23 .) All Our Wrong Todays by Elan Mastai

Lists It Appears On:

  • Barnes & Noble
  • Popular Mechanics
  • Bookbub
  • D’Marge

“It’s 2016, and in Tom Barren’s world, technology has solved all of humanity’s problems—there’s no war, no poverty, no under-ripe avocadoes. Unfortunately, Tom isn’t happy. He’s lost the girl of his dreams. And what do you do when you’re heartbroken and have a time machine? Something stupid.

Finding himself stranded in a terrible alternate reality—which we immediately recognize as our 2016—Tom is desperate to fix his mistake and go home. Right up until the moment he discovers wonderfully unexpected versions of his family, his career, and the woman who may just be the love of his life.

Now Tom faces an impossible choice. Go back to his perfect but loveless life. Or stay in our messy reality with a soulmate by his side. His search for the answer takes him across continents and timelines in a quest to figure out, finally, who he really is and what his future—our future—is supposed to be.”

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22 .) Borne by Jeff VanderMeer

Lists It Appears On:

  • Powells
  • Barnes & Noble
  • Popular Mechanics
  • Washington Post

“In Borne, a young woman named Rachel survives as a scavenger in a ruined city half destroyed by drought and conflict. The city is dangerous, littered with discarded experiments from the Company―a biotech firm now derelict―and punished by the unpredictable predations of a giant bear. Rachel ekes out an existence in the shelter of a run-down sanctuary she shares with her partner, Wick, who deals his own homegrown psychoactive biotech.

One day, Rachel finds Borne during a scavenging mission and takes him home. Borne as salvage is little more than a green lump―plant or animal?―but exudes a strange charisma. Borne reminds Rachel of the marine life from the island nation of her birth, now lost to rising seas. There is an attachment she resents: in this world any weakness can kill you. Yet, against her instincts―and definitely against Wick’s wishes―Rachel keeps Borne. She cannot help herself. Borne, learning to speak, learning about the world, is fun to be with, and in a world so broken that innocence is a precious thing. For Borne makes Rachel see beauty in the desolation around her. She begins to feel a protectiveness she can ill afford.”

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21 .) Homo Deus: A Brief History of Tomorrow by Yuval Noah Harari

Lists It Appears On:

  • Washington Post
  • Amazon
  • Huffington Post
  • Kirkus

“Over the past century humankind has managed to do the impossible and rein in famine, plague, and war. This may seem hard to accept, but, as Harari explains in his trademark style—thorough, yet riveting—famine, plague and war have been transformed from incomprehensible and uncontrollable forces of nature into manageable challenges. For the first time ever, more people die from eating too much than from eating too little; more people die from old age than from infectious diseases; and more people commit suicide than are killed by soldiers, terrorists and criminals put together. The average American is a thousand times more likely to die from binging at McDonalds than from being blown up by Al Qaeda.

What then will replace famine, plague, and war at the top of the human agenda? As the self-made gods of planet earth, what destinies will we set ourselves, and which quests will we undertake? Homo Deus explores the projects, dreams and nightmares that will shape the twenty-first century—from overcoming death to creating artificial life. It asks the fundamental questions: Where do we go from here? And how will we protect this fragile world from our own destructive powers? This is the next stage of evolution. This is Homo Deus.”

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20 .) How to Murder Your Life by Cat Marnell

Lists It Appears On:

  • Powells
  • Paste
  • Harpers Bazaar
  • Glamour

“At twenty-six, Cat Marnell was an associate beauty editor at Lucky, one of the top fashion magazines in America—and that’s all most people knew about her. But she hid a secret life. She was a prescription drug addict. She was also a “doctor shopper” who manipulated Upper East Side psychiatrists for pills, pills, and more pills; a lonely bulimic who spent hundreds of dollars a week on binge foods; a promiscuous party girl who danced barefoot on banquets; a weepy and hallucination-prone insomniac who would take anything—anything—to sleep.

This is a tale of self-loathing, self-sabotage, and yes, self-tanner. It begins at a posh New England prep school—and with a prescription for Attention Deficit Disorder medication Ritalin. It continues to New York, where we follow Marnell’s amphetamine-fueled rise from intern to editor through the beauty departments of NYLON, Teen Vogue, Glamour, and Lucky. We see her fight between ambition and addiction and how, inevitably, her disease threatens everything she worked so hard to achieve.

From the Condé Nast building (where she rides the elevator alongside Anna Wintour) to seedy nightclubs, from doctors’ offices and mental hospitals, Marnell shows—like no one else can—what it is like to live in the wild, chaotic, often sinister world of a young female addict who can’t say no.”

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19 .) Killers of the Flower Moon by David Grann

Lists It Appears On:

  • Entertainment Weekly
  • Washington Post
  • Newsday
  • Amazon

“In the 1920s, the richest people per capita in the world were members of the Osage Indian nation in Oklahoma. After oil was discovered beneath their land, they rode in chauffeured automobiles, built mansions, and sent their children to study in Europe.
Then, one by one, the Osage began to be killed off. The family of an Osage woman, Mollie Burkhart, became a prime target. Her relatives were shot and poisoned. And it was just the beginning, as more and more members of the tribe began to die under mysterious circumstances.
In this last remnant of the Wild West—where oilmen like J. P. Getty made their fortunes and where desperadoes like Al Spencer, the “Phantom Terror,” roamed—many of those who dared to investigate the killings were themselves murdered. As the death toll climbed to more than twenty-four, the FBI took up the case. It was one of the organization’s first major homicide investigations and the bureau badly bungled the case. In desperation, the young director, J. Edgar Hoover, turned to a former Texas Ranger named Tom White to unravel the mystery. White put together an undercover team, including one of the only American Indian agents in the bureau. The agents infiltrated the region, struggling to adopt the latest techniques of detection. Together with the Osage they began to expose one of the most chilling conspiracies in American history. “

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18 .) The Animators by Kayla Rae Whitaker

Lists It Appears On:

  • Paste
  • Refinery 29
  • Entertainment Weekly
  • Bookbub

“In the male-dominated field of animation, Mel Vaught and Sharon Kisses are a dynamic duo, the friction of their differences driving them: Sharon, quietly ambitious but self-doubting; Mel, brash and unapologetic, always the life of the party. Best friends and artistic partners since the first week of college, where they bonded over their working-class roots and obvious talent, they spent their twenties ensconced in a gritty Brooklyn studio. Working, drinking, laughing. Drawing: Mel, to understand her tumultuous past, and Sharon, to lose herself altogether.

Now, after a decade of striving, the two are finally celebrating the release of their first full-length feature, which transforms Mel’s difficult childhood into a provocative and visually daring work of art. The toast of the indie film scene, they stand at the cusp of making it big. But with their success come doubt and destruction, cracks in their relationship threatening the delicate balance of their partnership. Sharon begins to feel expendable, suspecting that the ever-more raucous Mel is the real artist. During a trip to Sharon’s home state of Kentucky, the only other partner she has ever truly known—her troubled, charismatic childhood best friend, Teddy—reenters her life, and long-buried resentments rise to the surface, hastening a reckoning no one sees coming.

A funny, heartbreaking novel of friendship, art, and trauma, The Animators is about the secrets we keep and the burdens we shed on the road to adulthood.”

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17 .) The Arrangement by Sarah Dunn

Lists It Appears On:

  • Esquire
  • Huffington Post
  • Refinery 29
  • Kirkus

“Lucy and Owen, ambitious, thoroughly-therapized New Yorkers, have taken the plunge, trading in their crazy life in a cramped apartment for Beekman, a bucolic Hudson Valley exurb. They’ve got a two hundred year-old house, an autistic son obsessed with the Titanic, and 17 chickens, at last count. It’s the kind of paradise where stay-at-home moms team up to cook the school’s “”hot lunch,”” dads grill grass-fed burgers, and, as Lucy observes, “”chopping kale has become a certain kind of American housewife’s version of chopping wood.””

When friends at a wine-soaked dinner party reveal they’ve made their marriage open, sensible Lucy balks. There’s a part of her, though-the part that worries she’s become too comfortable being invisible-that’s intrigued. Why not try a short marital experiment? Six months, clear ground rules, zero questions asked. When an affair with a man in the city begins to seem more enticing than the happily-ever-after she’s known for the past nine years, Lucy must decide what truly makes her happy-“”real life,”” or the “”experiment?”””

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16 .) The Bear and the Nightingale by Katherine Arden

Lists It Appears On:

  • Powells
  • Barnes & Noble
  • Bookbub
  • Amazon

“At the edge of the Russian wilderness, winter lasts most of the year and the snowdrifts grow taller than houses. But Vasilisa doesn’t mind—she spends the winter nights huddled around the embers of a fire with her beloved siblings, listening to her nurse’s fairy tales. Above all, she loves the chilling story of Frost, the blue-eyed winter demon, who appears in the frigid night to claim unwary souls. Wise Russians fear him, her nurse says, and honor the spirits of house and yard and forest that protect their homes from evil.

After Vasilisa’s mother dies, her father goes to Moscow and brings home a new wife. Fiercely devout, city-bred, Vasilisa’s new stepmother forbids her family from honoring the household spirits. The family acquiesces, but Vasilisa is frightened, sensing that more hinges upon their rituals than anyone knows.

And indeed, crops begin to fail, evil creatures of the forest creep nearer, and misfortune stalks the village. All the while, Vasilisa’s stepmother grows ever harsher in her determination to groom her rebellious stepdaughter for either marriage or confinement in a convent.

As danger circles, Vasilisa must defy even the people she loves and call on dangerous gifts she has long concealed—this, in order to protect her family from a threat that seems to have stepped from her nurse’s most frightening tales.”

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15 .) The Refugees by Viet Thanh Nguyen

Lists It Appears On:

  • Esquire
  • Powells
  • D’Marge
  • Newsday

With the coruscating gaze that informed The Sympathizer, in The Refugees Viet Thanh Nguyen gives voice to lives led between two worlds, the adopted homeland and the country of birth. From a young Vietnamese refugee who suffers profound culture shock when he comes to live with two gay men in San Francisco, to a woman whose husband is suffering from dementia and starts to confuse her for a former lover, to a girl living in Ho Chi Minh City whose older half-sister comes back from America having seemingly accomplished everything she never will, the stories are a captivating testament to the dreams and hardships of immigration. The second piece of fiction by a major new voice in American letters, The Refugees is a beautifully written and sharply observed book about the aspirations of those who leave one country for another, and the relationships and desires for self-fulfillment that define our lives.

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14 .) Theft By Finding by David Sedaris

Lists It Appears On:

  • Powells
  • The AV Club
  • Harpers Bazaar
  • Newsday

“For forty years, David Sedaris has kept a diary in which he records everything that captures his attention-overheard comments, salacious gossip, soap opera plot twists, secrets confided by total strangers. These observations are the source code for his finest work, and through them he has honed his cunning, surprising sentences.

Now, Sedaris shares his private writings with the world. Theft by Finding, the first of two volumes, is the story of how a drug-abusing dropout with a weakness for the International House of Pancakes and a chronic inability to hold down a real job became one of the funniest people on the planet.

Written with a sharp eye and ear for the bizarre, the beautiful, and the uncomfortable, and with a generosity of spirit that even a misanthropic sense of humor can’t fully disguise, Theft By Finding proves that Sedaris is one of our great modern observers. It’s a potent reminder that when you’re as perceptive and curious as Sedaris, there’s no such thing as a boring day.”

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13 .) Homesick for Another World by Ottessa Moshfegh

Lists It Appears On:

  • Powells
  • Vulture
  • The AV Club
  • Paste
  • Time

“Ottessa Moshfegh’s debut novel Eileen was one of the literary events of 2015. Garlanded with critical acclaim, it was named a book of the year by The Washington Post and the San Francisco Chronicle, nominated for a National Book Critics Circle Award, short-listed for the Man Booker Prize, and won the PEN/Hemingway Award for debut fiction. But as many critics noted, Moshfegh is particularly held in awe for her short stories. Homesick for Another World is the rare case where an author’s short story collection is if anything more anticipated than her novel.

And for good reason. There’s something eerily unsettling about Ottessa Moshfegh’s stories, something almost dangerous, while also being delightful, and even laugh-out-loud funny. Her characters are all unsteady on their feet in one way or another; they all yearn for connection and betterment, though each in very different ways, but they are often tripped up by their own baser impulses and existential insecurities. Homesick for Another World is a master class in the varieties of self-deception across the gamut of individuals representing the human condition. But part of the unique quality of her voice, the echt Moshfeghian experience, is the way the grotesque and the outrageous are infused with tenderness and compassion. Moshfegh is our Flannery O’Connor, and Homesick for Another World is her Everything That Rises Must Converge or A Good Man is Hard to Find. The flesh is weak; the timber is crooked; people are cruel to each other, and stupid, and hurtful. But beauty comes from strange sources. And the dark energy surging through these stories is powerfully invigorating. We’re in the hands of an author with a big mind, a big heart, blazing chops, and a political acuity that is needle-sharp. The needle hits the vein before we even feel the prick.”

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12 .) Hunger: A Memoir of (My) Body by Roxane Gay

Lists It Appears On:

  • Washington Post
  • Nylon
  • Amazon
  • Indigo
  • Newsday

“New York Times bestselling author Roxane Gay has written with intimacy and sensitivity about food and bodies, using her own emotional and psychological struggles as a means of exploring our shared anxieties over pleasure, consumption, appearance, and health. As a woman who describes her own body as “wildly undisciplined,” Roxane understands the tension between desire and denial, between self-comfort and self-care. In Hunger, she casts an insightful and critical eye on her childhood, teens, and twenties—including the devastating act of violence that acted as a turning point in her young life—and brings readers into the present and the realities, pains, and joys of her daily life.

With the bracing candor, vulnerability, and authority that have made her one of the most admired voices of her generation, Roxane explores what it means to be overweight in a time when the bigger you are, the less you are seen. Hunger is a deeply personal memoir from one of our finest writers, and tells a story that hasn’t yet been told but needs to be.”

Purchase / Learn More



11 .) Marlena by Julie Buntin

Lists It Appears On:

  • Esquire
  • Refinery 29
  • Harpers Bazaar
  • Bookbub
  • Nylon

“Everything about fifteen-year-old Cat’s new town in rural Michigan is lonely and off-kilter until she meets her neighbor, the manic, beautiful, pill-popping Marlena. Cat is quickly drawn into Marlena’s orbit and as she catalogues a litany of firsts―first drink, first cigarette, first kiss, first pill―Marlena’s habits harden and calcify. Within the year, Marlena is dead, drowned in six inches of icy water in the woods nearby. Now, decades later, when a ghost from that pivotal year surfaces unexpectedly, Cat must try again to move on, even as the memory of Marlena calls her back.

Told in a haunting dialogue between past and present, Marlena is an unforgettable story of the friendships that shape us beyond reason and the ways it might be possible to pull oneself back from the brink.”

Purchase / Learn More



10 .) Priestdaddy: A Memoir by Patricia Lockwood

Lists It Appears On:

  • Vulture
  • Washington Post
  • Nylon
  • Amazon
  • Refinery 29

“In Priestdaddy, Lockwood interweaves emblematic moments from her childhood and adolescence—from an ill-fated family hunting trip and an abortion clinic sit-in where her father was arrested to her involvement in a cultlike Catholic youth group—with scenes that chronicle the eight-month adventure she and her husband had in her parents’ household after a decade of living on their own. Lockwood details her education of a seminarian who is also living at the rectory, tries to explain Catholicism to her husband, who is mystified by its bloodthirstiness and arcane laws, and encounters a mysterious substance on a hotel bed with her mother.

Lockwood pivots from the raunchy to the sublime, from the comic to the deeply serious, exploring issues of belief, belonging, and personhood. Priestdaddy is an entertaining, unforgettable portrait of a deeply odd religious upbringing, and how one balances a hard-won identity with the weight of family and tradition.”

Purchase / Learn More



9 .) The Rules Do Not Apply by Ariel Levy

Lists It Appears On:

  • Esquire
  • Refinery 29
  • Harpers Bazaar
  • Nylon
  • Entertainment Weekly

“When Ariel Levy left for a reporting trip to Mongolia in 2012, she was pregnant, married, financially secure, and successful on her own terms. A month later, none of that was true.

Levy picks you up and hurls you through the story of how she built an unconventional life and then watched it fall apart with astonishing speed. Like much of her generation, she was raised to resist traditional rules—about work, about love, and about womanhood.

In this “deeply human and deeply moving” (The New York Times Book Review) memoir, Levy chronicles the adventure and heartbreak of being, in her own words, “a woman who is free to do whatever she chooses.” Her story of resilience becomes an unforgettable portrait of the shifting forces in our culture, of what has changed—and of what is eternal.”

Purchase / Learn More



8 .) We Were the Lucky Ones by Georgia Hunter

Lists It Appears On:

  • Glamour
  • Glamour
  • Bookbub
  • Parchment Girl
  • D’Marge

“It is the spring of 1939 and three generations of the Kurc family are doing their best to live normal lives, even as the shadow of war grows closer. The talk around the family Seder table is of new babies and budding romance, not of the increasing hardships threatening Jews in their hometown of Radom, Poland. But soon the horrors overtaking Europe will become inescapable and the Kurcs will be flung to the far corners of the world, each desperately trying to navigate his or her own path to safety.

As one sibling is forced into exile, another attempts to flee the continent, while others struggle to escape certain death, either by working grueling hours on empty stomachs in the factories of the ghetto or by hiding as gentiles in plain sight. Driven by an unwavering will to survive and by the fear that they may never see one another again, the Kurcs must rely on hope, ingenuity, and inner strength to persevere.

An extraordinary, propulsive novel, We Were the Lucky Ones demonstrates how in the face of the twentieth century’s darkest moment, the human spirit can endure and even thrive.”

Purchase / Learn More



7 .) Anything Is Possible by Elizabeth Strout

Lists It Appears On:

  • Esquire
  • Refinery 29
  • Entertainment Weekly
  • Glamour
  • Washington Post
  • Newsday

“Recalling Olive Kitteridge in its richness, structure, and complexity, Anything Is Possible explores the whole range of human emotion through the intimate dramas of people struggling to understand themselves and others.

Here are two sisters: One trades self-respect for a wealthy husband while the other finds in the pages of a book a kindred spirit who changes her life. The janitor at the local school has his faith tested in an encounter with an isolated man he has come to help; a grown daughter longs for mother love even as she comes to accept her mother’s happiness in a foreign country; and the adult Lucy Barton (the heroine of My Name Is Lucy Barton, the author’s celebrated New York Times bestseller) returns to visit her siblings after seventeen years of absence.

Reverberating with the deep bonds of family, and the hope that comes with reconciliation, Anything Is Possible again underscores Elizabeth Strout’s place as one of America’s most respected and cherished authors.”

Purchase / Learn More



6 .) The Hate U Give by Angie Thomas

Lists It Appears On:

  • Powells
  • The Young Folks
  • Entertainment Weekly
  • Indigo
  • Bookbub
  • Seventeen

“Sixteen-year-old Starr Carter moves between two worlds: the poor neighborhood where she lives and the fancy suburban prep school she attends. The uneasy balance between these worlds is shattered when Starr witnesses the fatal shooting of her childhood best friend Khalil at the hands of a police officer. Khalil was unarmed.

Soon afterward, his death is a national headline. Some are calling him a thug, maybe even a drug dealer and a gangbanger. Protesters are taking to the streets in Khalil’s name. Some cops and the local drug lord try to intimidate Starr and her family. What everyone wants to know is: what really went down that night? And the only person alive who can answer that is Starr.

But what Starr does—or does not—say could upend her community. It could also endanger her life.”

Purchase / Learn More



5 .) The Idiot by Elif Batuman

Lists It Appears On:

  • Vulture
  • The AV Club
  • Refinery 29
  • Time
  • Bookbub
  • Nylon

“The year is 1995, and email is new. Selin, the daughter of Turkish immigrants, arrives for her freshman year at Harvard. She signs up for classes in subjects she has never heard of, befriends her charismatic and worldly Serbian classmate, Svetlana, and, almost by accident, begins corresponding with Ivan, an older mathematics student from Hungary. Selin may have barely spoken to Ivan, but with each email they exchange, the act of writing seems to take on new and increasingly mysterious meanings.

At the end of the school year, Ivan goes to Budapest for the summer, and Selin heads to the Hungarian countryside, to teach English in a program run by one of Ivan’s friends. On the way, she spends two weeks visiting Paris with Svetlana. Selin’s summer in Europe does not resonate with anything she has previously heard about the typical experiences of American college students, or indeed of any other kinds of people. For Selin, this is a journey further inside herself: a coming to grips with the ineffable and exhilarating confusion of first love, and with the growing consciousness that she is doomed to become a writer.

With superlative emotional and intellectual sensitivity, mordant wit, and pitch-perfect style, Batuman dramatizes the uncertainty of life on the cusp of adulthood. Her prose is a rare and inimitable combination of tenderness and wisdom; its logic as natural and inscrutable as that of memory itself. The Idiot is a heroic yet self-effacing reckoning with the terror and joy of becoming a person in a world that is as intoxicating as it is disquieting. Batuman’s fiction is unguarded against both life’s affronts and its beauty–and has at its command the complete range of thinking and feeling which they entail.”

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4 .) A Separation by Katie Kitamura

Lists It Appears On:

  • The AV Club
  • Paste
  • Huffington Post
  • Refinery 29
  • Harpers Bazaar
  • Kirkus
  • Nylon

“A young woman has agreed with her faithless husband: it’s time for them to separate. For the moment it’s a private matter, a secret between the two of them. As she begins her new life, she gets word that Christopher has gone missing in a remote region in the rugged south of Greece; she reluctantly agrees to go look for him, still keeping their split to herself. In her heart, she’s not even sure if she wants to find him. As her search comes to a shocking breaking point, she discovers she understands less than she thought she did about her relationship and the man she used to love.

A searing, suspenseful story of intimacy and infidelity, A Separation lays bare what divides us from the inner lives of others. With exquisitely cool precision, Katie Kitamura propels us into the experience of a woman on edge, with a fiercely mesmerizing story to tell.”

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3 .) Norse Mythology by Neil Gaiman

Lists It Appears On:

  • Barnes & Noble
  • Paste
  • Huffington Post
  • Indigo
  • Kirkus
  • Washington Post
  • D’Marge

“In Norse Mythology, Gaiman stays true to the myths in envisioning the major Norse pantheon: Odin, the highest of the high, wise, daring, and cunning; Thor, Odin’s son, incredibly strong yet not the wisest of gods; and Loki―son of a giant―blood brother to Odin and a trickster and unsurpassable manipulator.

Gaiman fashions these primeval stories into a novelistic arc that begins with the genesis of the legendary nine worlds and delves into the exploits of deities, dwarfs, and giants. Once, when Thor’s hammer is stolen, Thor must disguise himself as a woman―difficult with his beard and huge appetite―to steal it back. More poignant is the tale in which the blood of Kvasir―the most sagacious of gods―is turned into a mead that infuses drinkers with poetry. The work culminates in Ragnarok, the twilight of the gods and rebirth of a new time and people.

Through Gaiman’s deft and witty prose emerge these gods with their fiercely competitive natures, their susceptibility to being duped and to duping others, and their tendency to let passion ignite their actions, making these long-ago myths breathe pungent life again.”

Purchase / Learn More



2 .) Exit West by Mohsin Hamid

Lists It Appears On:

  • Esquire
  • The AV Club
  • Paste
  • Huffington Post
  • Entertainment Weekly
  • Time
  • Kirkus
  • Washington Post
  • Nylon
  • D’Marge
  • Amazon
  • Indigo

“In a country teetering on the brink of civil war, two young people meet—sensual, fiercely independent Nadia and gentle, restrained Saeed. They embark on a furtive love affair, and are soon cloistered in a premature intimacy by the unrest roiling their city. When it explodes, turning familiar streets into a patchwork of checkpoints and bomb blasts, they begin to hear whispers about doors—doors that can whisk people far away, if perilously and for a price. As the violence escalates, Nadia and Saeed decide that they no longer have a choice. Leaving their homeland and their old lives behind, they find a door and step through. . . .

Exit West follows these remarkable characters as they emerge into an alien and uncertain future, struggling to hold on to each other, to their past, to the very sense of who they are. Profoundly intimate and powerfully inventive, it tells an unforgettable story of love, loyalty, and courage that is both completely of our time and for all time.”

Purchase / Learn More



1 .) Lincoln in the Bardo by George Saunders

Lists It Appears On:

  • Esquire
  • Powells
  • The AV Club
  • Paste
  • Entertainment Weekly
  • Time
  • Bookbub
  • Washington Post
  • Nylon
  • D’Marge
  • Amazon
  • Indigo

“February 1862. The Civil War is less than one year old. The fighting has begun in earnest, and the nation has begun to realize it is in for a long, bloody struggle. Meanwhile, President Lincoln’s beloved eleven-year-old son, Willie, lies upstairs in the White House, gravely ill. In a matter of days, despite predictions of a recovery, Willie dies and is laid to rest in a Georgetown cemetery. “My poor boy, he was too good for this earth,” the president says at the time. “God has called him home.” Newspapers report that a grief-stricken Lincoln returns, alone, to the crypt several times to hold his boy’s body.

From that seed of historical truth, George Saunders spins an unforgettable story of familial love and loss that breaks free of its realistic, historical framework into a supernatural realm both hilarious and terrifying. Willie Lincoln finds himself in a strange purgatory where ghosts mingle, gripe, commiserate, quarrel, and enact bizarre acts of penance. Within this transitional state—called, in the Tibetan tradition, the bardo—a monumental struggle erupts over young Willie’s soul.

Lincoln in the Bardo is an astonishing feat of imagination and a bold step forward from one of the most important and influential writers of his generation. Formally daring, generous in spirit, deeply concerned with matters of the heart, it is a testament to fiction’s ability to speak honestly and powerfully to the things that really matter to us. Saunders has invented a thrilling new form that deploys a kaleidoscopic, theatrical panorama of voices to ask a timeless, profound question: How do we live and love when we know that everything we love must end?”

Purchase / Learn More




The Additional Best Books Of 2017



 

# Book Author Lists
(Books Appear On 2 Lists Each)
38 A Book of American Martyrs Joyce Carol Oates Refinery 29
Washington Post
39 A Conjuring of Light V. E. Schwab Barnes & Noble
Best Fantasy Books
40 A List of Cages Robin Roe Powells
The Young Folks
41 A Piece of the World Christina Baker Kline Huffington Post
Kirkus
42 Abandon Me Melissa Febos Esquire
Refinery 29
43 Aftercare Instructions Bonnie Pipkin The Young Folks
Refinery 29
44 All Grown Up Jami Attenberg Refinery 29
Glamour
45 Beartown: A Novel Fredrik Backman Amazon
Indigo
46 Caraval Stephanie Garber The Young Folks
Bookbub
47 Carve The Mark Veronica Roth Seventeen
Brightly
48 Celine Peter Heller Esquire
Powells
49 City of Miracles Robert Jackson Bennett Barnes & Noble
Best Fantasy Books
50 City of Saints & Thieves Natalie C. Anderson Seventeen
Brightly
51 Dear Ijeawele, or A Feminist Manifesto in Fifteen Suggestions Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie Indigo
Parchment Girl
52 Difficult Women Roxane Gay Refinery 29
Glamour
53 Empress of a Thousand Skies Rhoda Belleza Huffington Post
Kirkus
54 Flame in the Mist Renee Ahdieh The Young Folks
Indigo
55 Gem & Dixie Sara Zarr Seventeen
Brightly
56 History of Wolves Emily Fridlund Refinery 29
Bookbub
57 Imagine Wanting Only This Kristen Radtke Refinery 29
Nylon
58 Madame President: The Extraordinary Journey of Ellen Johnson Sirleaf Helene Cooper Washington Post
Refinery 29
59 No One Is Coming To Save Us Stephanie Powell Watts Refinery 29
Washington Post
60 On Tyranny Timothy Snyder Washington Post
Indigo
61 Once and for All Sarah Dessen Seventeen
Brightly
62 Oola Brittany Newell Refinery 29
Nylon
63 Pachinko Min Jin Lee Esquire
D’Marge
64 Red Sister Mark Lawrence Barnes & Noble
Best Fantasy Books
65 Richard Nixon John A. Farrell Washington Post
Newsday
66 Royal Bastards Andrew Shvarts The Young Folks
Brightly
67 Saints For All Occasions J. COURTNEY SULLIVAN Glamour
Washington Post
68 Six Wakes Mur Lafferty Barnes & Noble
Popular Mechanics
69 South and West Joan Didion Vulture
Harpers Bazaar
70 Startup Doree Shafrir Esquire
Nylon
71 Stephen Florida Gabe Habash Powells
Nylon
72 Sunshine State Sarah Gerard Powells
Nylon
73 The Best We Could Do Thi Bui Powells
Refinery 29
74 The Futures Anna Pitoniak Refinery 29
Bookbub
75 The Impossible Fortress Jason Rekulak The AV Club
Amazon
76 The Last Days Of Café Leila Donia Bijan The AV Club
Refinery 29
77 The Leavers Lisa Ko Refinery 29
Bookbub
78 The Lonely Hearts Hotel Heather O’Neill Refinery 29
Indigo
79 The Lost City of the Monkey God Douglas Preston Parchment Girl
Amazon
80 The Lucky Ones Julianne Pachico Paste
Refinery 29
81 The Moon and the Other John Kessel Barnes & Noble
Popular Mechanics
82 The Mother Of All Questions Rebecca Solnit The AV Club
Parchment Girl
83 The Seven Husband’s of Evelyn Hugo Taylor Jenkins Reid Glamour
Refinery 29
84 The Stars Are Legion Kameron Hurley Barnes & Noble
Popular Mechanics
85 The Stolen Child Lisa Carey Huffington Post
Kirkus
86 The Twelve Lives of Samuel Hawley Hannah Tinti Paste
Washington Post
87 The Wanderers Meg Howrey Barnes & Noble
Paste
88 This Is How It Always Is Laurie Frankel Refinery 29
Amazon
89 Universal Harvester John Darnielle Paste
D’Marge
90 Waking Gods Sylvain Neuvel Paste
Popular Mechanics
91 Walkaway Cory Doctorow Barnes & Noble
Popular Mechanics
92 We Are Okay Nina LaCour Seventeen
Brightly
93 White Tears Hari Kunzru Vulture
Time
94 You Don’t Have to Say You Love Me Sherman Alexie Powells
Amazon
(Books Appear On 1 List Each)
95 A Word For Love Emily Robbins Refinery 29
96 Al Franken, Giant of the Senate Al Franken Powells
97 Alex & Eliza: A Love Story Melissa de la Cruz Seventeen
98 All Systems Red: The Murderbot Diaries Martha Wells Barnes & Noble
99 All the Beloved Ghosts Alison MacLeod Paste
100 All The Lives I Want Alana Massey Refinery 29
101 Allegedly Tiffany D. Jackson Seventeen
102 Almost Missed You Jessica Strawser Bookbub
103 Always and Forever, Lara Jean Jenny Han Seventeen
104 Amberlough Lara Elena Donnelly Barnes & Noble
105 An American Sickness ELISABETH ROSENTHAL Washington Post
106 And We’re Off Dana Schwartz Seventeen
107 ASTROPHYSICS FOR PEOPLE IN A HURRY Neil Degrasse Tyson Indigo
108 Autumn Ali Smith Powells
109 Awaken Online: Precipice Travis Bagwell Best Fantasy Books
110 Binti: Home Nnedi Okorafor Barnes & Noble
111 BLACK EDGE D’Marge
112 Books for Living Will Schwalbe Parchment Girl
113 Bound Benedict Jacka Best Fantasy Books
114 Branding (In Five And A Half Steps) Michael Johnson Isaac Jeffries
115 Bunkie Spills Bradley K. Rosen Powells
116 Camp So-and-So Mary McCoy Brightly
117 Cannibalism Bill Schutt Parchment Girl
118 Caught in the Revolution: Petrograd, Russia, 1917 — A World on the Edge, Helen Rappaport Newsday
119 Chalk Paul Cornell Barnes & Noble
120 Chemistry Weike Wang Bookbub
121 Dead Letters Caite Dolan-Leach Bookbub
122 Dear Cyborgs Nylon
123 Dear Reader Mary O’Connell The Young Folks
124 Debriefing Susan Sontag Harpers Bazaar
125 Defy the Stars Claudia Gray Powells
126 Down Among the Sticks and Bones Seanan McGuire Barnes & Noble
127 Down City: A Daughter’s Story of Love, Memory and Murder Leah Carroll Refinery 29
128 Dr. Potter’s Medicine Show Eric Scott Fischl Barnes & Noble
129 Ernest Hemingway MARY V. DEARBORN Washington Post
130 Essex Serpent Sarah Perry Powells
131 EVERYBODY’S SON: A NOVEL Thrity Umrigar Indigo
132 Everyone’s a Aliebn When Ur a Aliebn Too: A Book Glamour
133 Everything Belongs To Us Yoojin Grace Wuertz Refinery 29
134 Fiery Ferments Kirsten K. Shockey and Christopher Shockey Powells
135 Finding Powells
136 GEEKERELLA: A FANGIRL FAIRY TALE Ashley Poston Indigo
137 Ginny Moon: A Novel Benjamin Ludwig Amazon
138 Good Jeff Zentner Brightly
139 Hacking Growth Sean Ellis and Morgan Brown Isaac Jeffries
140 Huck Out West, Robert Coover Newsday
141 I Believe in a Thing Called Love Maurene Goo Seventeen
142 I FOUND YOU: A NOVEL Lisa Jewell Indigo
143 I Got This Glamour
144 I HEAR SHE’S A REAL BITCH Jen Agg Indigo
145 I Liked My Life Abby Fabiaschi Bookbub
146 I’ll Eat When I’m Dead Barbara Bourland Refinery 29
147 If We Were Villains M.L. Rio Refinery 29
148 Imaginary Cities: A Tour Of Dream Cities, Nightmare Cities, And Everywhere In Between Darran Anderson The AV Club
149 Into The Water Paula Hawkins Refinery 29
150 IRRESISTIBLE D’Marge
151 Isadora Amelia Gray Powells
152 It Happens All The Time Amy Hatvany Refinery 29
153 It’s Not Like It’s a Secret Misa Sugiura Seventeen
154 Janesville AMY GOLDSTEIN Washington Post
155 Jefferson JOHN B. BOLES Washington Post
156 Joni: The Anthology Barney Hoskyns Harpers Bazaar
157 Kill All Happies Rachel Cohn Brightly
158 King’s Cage Victoria Aveyard Best Fantasy Books
159 Kings of the Wyld Nicholas Eames Barnes & Noble
160 Leaders Eat Last Simon Sinek Isaac Jeffries
161 Letterman JASON ZINOMAN Washington Post
162 Lilli de Jong Janet Benton Bookbub
163 Lillian Boxfish Takes a Walk Kathleen Rooney Powells
164 Literally Lucy Keating Brightly
165 Lord of Shadows Cassandra Clare Seventeen
166 Lotus Lijia Zhang Refinery 29
167 Lotus Blue Cat Sparks Barnes & Noble
168 Lucky Boy Shanthi Sekaran Refinery 29
169 Lucky You Erika Carter Refinery 29
170 Mary Page Marlowe Tracy Letts Powells
171 Men Without Women Haruki Murakami Esquire
172 Miranda and Caliban Jacqueline Carey Best Fantasy Books
173 Miss Burma Charmaine Craig Refinery 29
174 Mothers and Other Strangers Gina Sorrell Refinery 29
175 Mr. Rochester Sarah Shoemaker Refinery 29
176 My Absolute Darling Gabriel Tallent Harpers Bazaar
177 My Cat Yugoslavia Pajtim Statovci Powells
178 My Favorite Thing is Monsters Emil Ferris Entertainment Weekly
179 My Life with Bob Pamela Paul Harpers Bazaar
180 MY LOVELY WIFE IN THE PSYCH WARD: A MEMOIR Mark Lukach Indigo
181 Next Year, For Sure Zoey Leigh Peterson Bookbub
182 No One Cares About Crazy People RON POWERS Washington Post
183 Not a Sound HEATHER GUDENKAUF Washington Post
184 Notes on a Banana David Leite Paste
185 One Day We’ll All Be Dead And None Of This Will Matter Scaachi Koul Refinery 29
186 One of the Boys: A Novel Daniel Magariel Amazon
187 One of Us Is Lying Karen M. McManus Seventeen
188 Opening Wednesday At A Theater Or Drive-In Near You: The Shadow Cinema Of The American ’70s Charles Taylor The AV Club
189 Orbital Cloud Taiyo Fujii Barnes & Noble
190 Our Little Racket Angelica Baker Refinery 29
191 Oversubscribed Daniel Priestley Isaac Jeffries
192 Passing Strange Ellen Klages Barnes & Noble
193 Perennials Mandy Berman Refinery 29
194 Perfect Ten Seventeen
195 Piecing Me Together Renee Watson Refinery 29
196 Portraits Of Courage Glamour
197 Protestants Alec Ryrie Parchment Girl
198 Public Relations Katie Heaney Seventeen
199 Ragdoll Daniel Cole Bookbub
200 Raven Stratagem Yoon Ha Lee Barnes & Noble
201 REALITY IS NOT WHAT IT SEEMS: THE JOURNEY TO QUANTUM GRAVITY D’Marge
202 Rich People Problems Kevin Kwan Esquire
203 Rising Star DAVID GARROW Washington Post
204 River of Teeth Sarah Gailey Barnes & Noble
205 Robert Lowell KAY REDFIELD JAMISON Washington Post
206 Running Cara Hoffman Esquire
207 SAGA VOLUME 7 Brian K Vaughan Indigo
208 Salt Houses Nylon
209 Schadenfreude, A Love Story Rebecca Schuman Refinery 29
210 Silence Fallen Patricia Briggs Best Fantasy Books
211 Since We Fell DENNIS LEHANE Washington Post
212 Sins of Empire Brian McClellan Best Fantasy Books
213 Skullsworn Brian Staveley Best Fantasy Books
214 Small Hours Jennifer Kitses Refinery 29
215 Smart Baseball Keith Law Powells
216 Snotgirl, Volume 1 Bryan Lee O’Malley and Leslie Hung Powells
217 So Much Blue Percival Everett Vulture
218 Standard Deviation KATHERINE HEINY Washington Post
219 Such Small Hands Andrés Barba Powells
220 Sympathy Olivia Sudjic Refinery 29
221 Tell Me Everything You Don’t Remember Christine Hyung-Oak Lee Refinery 29
222 The Amateurs Sara Shepard Glamour
223 The Art of Possibility Rosamund Stone Zander and Benjamin Zander Isaac Jeffries
224 The Awkward Thoughts of W. Kamau Bell W. Kamau Bell Esquire
225 The Bed Moved Rebecca Schiff Powells
226 The Berlin Project Gregory Benford Barnes & Noble
227 The Best Of Adam Sharp Glamour
228 The Blood of Emmett Till TIMOTHY B. TYSON Washington Post
229 The Book of Polly Kathy Hepinstall Refinery 29
230 The Bright Hour NINA RIGGS Washington Post
231 The British author’s novel follows its enigmatic narrator Faye Time
232 The Chilbury Ladies’ Choir Jennifer Ryan Bookbub
233 The Collapsing Empire John Scalzi Barnes & Noble
234 The Dinner Party and Other Stories Joshua Ferris Esquire
235 The Dragon’s Legacy Deborah A. Wolf Barnes & Noble
236 The Dry Jane Harper Bookbub
237 The End Of Men Karen Rinaldi Refinery 29
238 The Evangelicals FRANCES FITZGERALD Washington Post
239 The F Word Liza Palmer Refinery 29
240 The Fact of a Body Alexandria Marzano-Lesnevich Entertainment Weekly
241 The Fall Of Lisa Bellow Glamour
242 The Gatlon School for Vigilantes Marissa Meyer Brightly
243 The Gift Nylon
244 The Girl From The Metropol Hotel Ludmilla Petrushevskaya Refinery 29
245 The Golden House Salman Rushdie Harpers Bazaar
246 The H-Spot: The Feminist Pursuit of Happiness Jill Filipovic Refinery 29
247 The House of Binding Thorns Aliette de Bodard Barnes & Noble
248 The Inexplicable Logic of My Life Benjamin Alire Sáenz Brightly
249 The Invention of Angela Carter Edmund Gordon Vulture
250 The Kingdom Emmanuel Carrère Paste
251 The Last Good Man Linda Nagata Barnes & Noble
252 The Long Drop DENISE MINA Washington Post
253 The Love Interest Cale Dietrich Brightly
254 The Marsh King’s Daughter Karen Dionne Parchment Girl
255 The Meaning Of Michelle Glamour
256 The Most Dangerous Place On Earth Lindsey Lee Johnson Refinery 29
257 The New Odyssey Patrick Kingsley Parchment Girl
258 The Novel of the Century David Bellos Paste
259 The One Memory of Flora Banks Emily Barr Seventeen
260 The Poetry of Pop ADAM BRADLEY Washington Post
261 The Possessions Sara Flannery Murphy Refinery 29
262 The Prey of Gods Nicky Drayden Barnes & Noble
263 THE PRINCESS SAVES HERSELF IN THIS ONE Amanda Lovelace Indigo
264 The Refrigerator Monologues Catherynne M. Valente, illustrated by Annie Wu Barnes & Noble
265 The River At Night Erica Ferencik Refinery 29
266 The Sarah Book Nylon
267 The Schooldays of Jesus J. M. Coetzee Vulture
268 The Shark Club Ann Kidd Taylor Refinery 29
269 The Skin Above My Knee MARCIA BUTLER Washington Post
270 The Strange Case of the Alchemist’s Daughter Theodora Goss Barnes & Noble
271 The Takedown Corrie Wang Seventeen
272 The Weight of Ink Rachel Kadish Amazon
273 The Whole Thing Together Ann Brashares Brightly
274 The Widow of Wall Street Randy Susan Meyers Refinery 29
275 The Witchwood Crown Tad Williams Barnes & Noble
276 THE WOMAN IN CABIN 10 Ruth Ware Indigo
277 The Woman Next Door Yewande Omotoso Refinery 29
278 The Women in the Castle Jessica Shattuck Powells
279 There Are More Beautiful Things Than Beyonce Nylon
280 Things We Lost in the Fire Mariana Enríquez Paste
281 This Is Just My Face Glamour
282 This Is Really Happening Erin Chack Seventeen
283 Too Much and Not the Mood Nylon
284 Tools of Titans Tim Ferriss Isaac Jeffries
285 Touch Courtney Maum Refinery 29
286 Traitor to the Throne Alwyn Hamilton The Young Folks
287 Transit Rachel Cusk Time
288 Tyrant’s Throne Sebastien de Castell Best Fantasy Books
289 Vanguard Jack Campbell Barnes & Noble
290 Void Star Zachary Mason Vulture
291 Wabi-Sabi Welcome Julie Pointer Adams Powells
292 Wait Till You See Me Dance Deb Olin Unferth Vulture
293 Waking Lions Ayelet Gundar-Goshen Bookbub
294 WHAT IT MEANS WHEN A MAN FALLS FROM THE SKY D’Marge
295 What to Say Next Julie Buxbaum Brightly
296 What We Do Now: Standing Up For Your Values In Trump’s America Refinery 29
297 Who Killed Piet Barol? Richard Mason Newsday
298 Who Thought This Was a Good Idea?: And Other Questions You Should Have Answers to When You Work in the White House Alyssa Mastromonaco Esquire
299 Why I Am Not A Feminist: A Feminist Manifesto Jessa Crispin Refinery 29
300 Wine. All the Time. Marissa A. Ross Powells
301 Winter Tide Ruthanna Emrys Barnes & Noble
302 With Blood Upon the Sand Bradley P. Beaulie… Best Fantasy Books
303 Woman No. 17 EDAN LEPUCKI Washington Post
304 Word By Word: The Secret Life Of Dictionaries Kory Stamper The AV Club
305 You Don’t Look Your Age… And Other Fairy Tales Sheila Nevins Refinery 29
306 You’re Welcome, Universe Whitney Gardner Brightly


27 Best 2017 (So Far) Book Sources/Lists



Source Article
Amazon Top 20 picks for the best books of the year so far
Barnes & Noble The Best Science Fiction & Fantasy Books of 2017 So Far
Best Fantasy Books Best Fantasy Books of 2017 (So Far)
Bookbub 24 Breakthrough Books of 2017 (So Far)
Brightly 17 of the Most Exciting YA Books to Read in 2017
D’Marge THE BEST NEW BOOKS OF 2017 (SO FAR)
Entertainment Weekly The 10 Best Books of 2017 So Far
Esquire The Best Books of 2017 (So Far)
Glamour Best Books to Read in 2017
Harpers Bazaar THE BEST NEW BOOKS OF 2017 (SO FAR)
Huffington Post The 9 Most Addictive Books of 2017 (So Far)
Indigo THE BEST BOOKS OF THE YEAR SO FAR
Isaac Jeffries The Best Books of 2017…. So Far
Kirkus The 9 Most Addictive Books of 2017 (So Far)
Newsday Best books of 2017 so far
Nylon The Best Books Of The Year, So Far
Parchment Girl The Best Books of 2017 (So Far)
Paste The Best Books of 2017 (So Far)
Popular Mechanics The Best Science Fiction Books of 2017 (So Far)
Powells Powell’s Midyear Roundup: Best Books of 2017 So Far
Refinery 29 These Are Our Favorite Books Of 2017 — So Far
Seventeen 20 of the Best YA Books of 2017
The AV Club The A.V. Club’s favorite books of 2017 so far
The Young Folks Top Ten Books of 2017 (So Far)
Time Best Fiction Books of 2017 So Far
Vulture The Best Books of 2017 (So Far)
Washington Post 37 BOOKS WE’VE LOVED SO FAR IN 2017

 

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