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Ranking Author Elizabeth Berg’s Best Books (A Bibliography Countdown)

“What are Elizabeth Berg’s Best Books?” We looked at all of Berg’s authored bibliography and ranked them against one another to answer that very question!

We took all of the books written by Elizabeth Berg and looked at their Goodreads, Amazon, and LibraryThing scores, ranking them against one another to see which books came out on top. The books are ranked in our list below based on which titles have the highest overall score between all 3 review sites in comparison with all of the other books by the same author. The process isn’t super scientific and in reality, most books aren’t “better” than other books as much as they are just different. That being said, we do enjoy seeing where our favorites landed, and if you aren’t familiar with the author at all, the rankings can help you see what books might be best to start with.

The full ranking chart is also included below the countdown on the bottom of the page.

Happy Scrolling!



The Top Book’s Of Elizabeth Berg



29 ) The Confession Club

Review Website Ranks:

  • Goodreads: 27
  • Amazon: 28
  • LibraryThing: 27

In a captivating novel from the bestselling author of The Story of Arthur Truluv, a group of women in Mason, Missouri discover that best friends are made by sharing secrets. It all started as a supper club, a group gathering monthly to share homemade dinners, until the night one woman made a startling revelation. After that, the “Confession Club” decided to meet weekly to feast not only on dinner, but on admissions of misdeeds, embarrassments, and insecurities. When Iris Winters and Maddy Harris are invited to the club, they find that it’s just what each of them needs. Iris hasn’t yet told anyone about the unlikely man who has captured her attention, and Maddy has come back home to escape a problem too big for her to confront. The Confession Club is a heartwarming and illuminating book about women, friendship, and how sharing the secrets we’re afraid of revealing can actually bring us closer.



27 ) The Dream Lover

	The Dream Lover

Review Website Ranks:

  • Goodreads: 24
  • Amazon: 26
  • LibraryThing: 24

At the beginning of this powerful novel, we meet Aurore Dupin as she is leaving her estranged husband, a loveless marriage, and her family’s estate in the French countryside to start a new life in Paris. There, she gives herself a new name – George Sand – and pursues her dream of becoming a writer, embracing an unconventional and even scandalous lifestyle. Paris in the nineteenth century comes vividly alive, illuminated by the story of the loves, passions, and fierce struggles of a woman who defied the confines of society. Sand’s many lovers and friends include Frederic Chopin, Gustave Flaubert, Franz Liszt, Eugene Delacroix, Victor Hugo, Marie Dorval, and Alfred de Musset. As Sand welcomes fame and friendship, she fights to overcome heartbreak and prejudice, failure and loss. Though considered the most gifted genius of her time, she works to reconcile the pain of her childhood, of disturbing relationships with her mother and daughter, and of her intimacies with women and men. Will the life she longs for always be just out of reach – a dream?



27 ) Once Upon a Time, There Was You

	Once Upon a Time, There Was You

Review Website Ranks:

  • Goodreads: 26
  • Amazon: 23
  • LibraryThing: 25

Even on their wedding day, John and Irene sensed that they were about to make a mistake. Years later, divorced, dating other people, and living in different parts of the country, they seem to have nothing in common – nothing except the most important person in each of their lives: Sadie, their spirited eighteen-year-old daughter. Feeling smothered by Irene and distanced from John, Sadie is growing more and more attached to her new boyfriend, Ron. When tragedy strikes, Irene and John come together to support the daughter they love so dearly. What takes longer is to remember how they really feel about each other. Elizabeth Berg has once again created characters who embody the many shades of the human spirit. Reading Berg’s fiction allows us to reflect on our deepest emotions, and her gifts as a writer make Once Upon a Time, There Was You a wonderful novel about the power of love, the unshakeable bonds of family, and the beauty of second chances.



26 ) The Handmaid and the Carpenter

	The Handmaid and the Carpenter

Review Website Ranks:

  • Goodreads: 25
  • Amazon: 22
  • LibraryThing: 26

We see Mary – young, strong, and inquisitive – as she first meets Joseph, a serious-minded young carpenter who is steadfastly devoted to the religious traditions of their people. The two become betrothed, but are soon faced with an unexpected pregnancy. Aided by a great and abiding love, they endure challenges to their relationship as well as threats to their lives as they come to terms with the mysterious circumstances surrounding the birth of their child, Jesus. For Mary, the pregnancy is a divine miracle and a privilege. For Joseph, it is an ongoing test not only of his courage but of his faith – in his wife as well as in his God. Exquisitely written and imbued with the truthful emotions and richness of detail that have earned Elizabeth Berg a devoted readership, The Handmaid and the Carpenter explores lives touched profoundly by miracles large and small. This powerful and moving novel is destined to become a classic.



25 ) Home Safe

Review Website Ranks:

  • Goodreads: 21
  • Amazon: 27
  • LibraryThing: 18

The bestselling author of The Day I Ate Whatever I Wanted and The Year of Pleasures returns with a wonderful novel about a woman, a daughter, and a surprising change in life Beloved author Elizabeth Berg tells the story of the recently widowed Helen Ames and of her twenty-seven-year-old daughter Tessa. Helen is shocked to discover that her mild-mannered and loyal husband had been leading a double life. The Ames’s had saved money for a happy retirement, planned in minute detail, but that money has disappeared in several big withdrawals – spent by Helen’s husband before he died. What could he possibly have been doing? And what is Helen to do now? Why does Helen’s daughter object to her mother’s applying for a job – and why doesn’t Tessa meet a nice man and get married?



23 ) Tapestry of Fortunes

	Tapestry of Fortunes

Review Website Ranks:

  • Goodreads: 22
  • Amazon: 20
  • LibraryThing: 23

Cecilia Ross is a motivational speaker who encourages others to change their lives for the better. Why can’t she take her own advice? Still reeling from the death of her next-door neighbor and best friend, and freshly aware of the need to live more fully now, Cece realizes that she has to make a move – all the portentous signs seem to point in that direction. She decides to downsize her life, which means selling her suburban Minnesota home and letting go of many of her possessions. She moves into a beautiful old house in Saint Paul, complete with a gorgeous garden, chef’s kitchen, and three housemates: Lise, the home’s owner and a divorced mother at odds with her twenty-year-old daughter; Joni, a top-notch sous chef at a first-rate restaurant with a grade A jerk of a boss; and Renie, the youngest and most mercurial of the group, who is trying to rectify a teenage mistake. These women, each feeling restless in her own way, embark on a journey together in an attempt to connect with parts of themselves long denied.



23 ) The Last Time I Saw You

	The Last Time I Saw You

Review Website Ranks:

  • Goodreads: 23
  • Amazon: 20
  • LibraryThing: 22

To each of the men and women in The Last Time I Saw You, this reunion means something different – a last opportunity to say something long left unsaid, an escape from the bleaker realities of everyday life, a means to save a marriage on the rocks, or an opportunity to bond with a slightly estranged daughter, if only over what her mother should wear. As the onetime classmates meet up over the course of a weekend, they discover things that will irrevocably affect the rest of their lives. For newly divorced Dorothy Shauman, the reunion brings with it the possibility of finally attracting the attention of the class heartthrob, Pete Decker. For the ever self-reliant, ever left-out Mary Alice Mayhew, it’s a chance to reexamine a painful past. For Lester Heseenpfeffer, a veterinarian and widower, it is the hope of talking shop with a fellow vet – or at least that’s what he tells himself. For Candy Armstrong, the class beauty, it’s the hope of finding friendship before it is too late. As Dorothy, Mary Alice, Lester, Candy, and the other classmates converge for the reunion dinner, four decades melt away: Desires and personalities from their youth reemerge, and new discoveries are made. For so much has happened to them all.



22 ) Dream When You’re Feeling Blue

	Dream When You're Feeling Blue

Review Website Ranks:

  • Goodreads: 19
  • Amazon: 23
  • LibraryThing: 21

As the novel opens, Kitty and Louise Heaney say good-bye to their boyfriends Julian and Michael, who are going to fight overseas. On the domestic front, meat is rationed, children participate in metal drives, and Tommy Dorsey and Glenn Miller play songs that offer hope and lift spirits. And now the Heaney sisters sit at their kitchen table every evening to write letters РLouise to her fianc̩, Kitty to the man she wishes fervently would propose, and Tish to an ever-changing group of men she meets at USO dances. In the letters the sisters send and receive are intimate glimpses of life both on the battlefront and at home. For Kitty, a confident, headstrong young woman, the departure of her boyfriend and the lessons she learns about love, resilience, and war will bring a surprise and a secret, and will lead her to a radical action for those she loves. The lifelong consequences of the choices the Heaney sisters make are at the heart of this superb novel about the power of love and the enduring strength of family.



21 ) Talk Before Sleep

Review Website Ranks:

  • Goodreads: 27
  • Amazon: 28
  • LibraryThing: 4

Until that moment, I hadn’t realized how much I’d been needing to meet someone I might be able to say everything to.’They met at a party. It was hate at first sight. Ruth was far too beautiful, too flamboyant. Not at all Ann’s kind of person. Until a chance encounter in the bathroom led to an alliance of souls. Soon they were sharing hankies during the late showing of Sophie’s World, wolfing down sundaes sodden with whipped cream, telling truths of marriage, mortality and love, secure in a kind of intimacy no man could ever know. After years of shared secrets, guilty pleasures, family life and divorce, they face a crisis that redefines the meaning of friendship and unconditional love. This is the story of Ruth. Of Ann. And of all of us who wonder what we’d say if we knew we didn’t have forever.



20 ) Until the Real Thing Comes Along

	Until the Real Thing Comes Along

Review Website Ranks:

  • Goodreads: 18
  • Amazon: 23
  • LibraryThing: 16

Her biological clock is in overdrive. But she’s in love with a gay man. Patty Murphy is facing that pivotal point in a woman’s life when her biological clock ticks as insistently as a beating heart. Will she find Mr Right and start a family? But Patty is in love – with a man who is not only attractive and financially sound, but sensitive and warmhearted. There’s just one small problem: He is also gay. Against her better judgment, and pleas from family and friends, Patty refuses to give up on Ethan. Every man she dates ultimately leaves her aching for the gentle comfort and intimacy she shares with him. But even as she throws eligible bachelors to the wayside to spend yet another platonic night with Ethan, Patty longs more and more for the consolation of loving and being loved. In the meantime she must content herself with waiting – until the real thing comes along…



19 ) Say When

	Say When

Review Website Ranks:

  • Goodreads: 17
  • Amazon: 18
  • LibraryThing: 19

He felt his stomach tighten, his heart begin to race. The coffeemaker beeped, signalling its readiness, and Ellen got up and poured two mugs. She set one in front of Griffin, one in front of herself. Griffin watched the steam rise up and curl back on itself, then dissipate. He said quietly, “I’m not going anywhere.” “Pardon?” “I said, I’m not going anywhere. I’m not moving.” She nodded. “I see. Well, I can’t. I have to be here to take care of Zoe.” Griffin pictured his daughter, a redheaded beauty who would knock the stuffing out of any man who crossed her. “All right, you can stay, too,” he told Ellen. “Griffin. One of us has to go.” In Say When, Elizabeth Berg negotiates perfectly the fine balance between humour and poignancy as she charts the days and nights of a family whose normal life has been shattered.



18 ) Open House

Review Website Ranks:

  • Goodreads: 15
  • Amazon: 18
  • LibraryThing: 19

Samantha’s husband has left her, and after a spree of overcharging at Tiffany’s, she settles down to reconstruct a life for herself and her eleven-year-old son. Her eccentric mother tries to help by fixing her up with dates, but a more pressing problem is money. To meet her mortgage payments, Sam decides to take in boarders. The first is an older woman who offers sage advice and sorely needed comfort; the second, a maladjusted student, is not quite so helpful. A new friend, King, an untraditional man, suggests that Samantha get out, get going, get work. But her real work is this: In order to emerge from grief and the past, she has to learn how to make her own happiness. In order to really see people, she has to look within her heart. And in order to know who she is, she has to remember–and reclaim–the person she used to be, long before she became someone else in an effort to save her marriage. Open House is a love story about what can blossom between a man and a woman, and within a woman herself.



17 ) The Art of Mending

Review Website Ranks:

  • Goodreads: 27
  • Amazon: 4
  • LibraryThing: 16

Is it too late to make up for the past? Laura Bartone looks forward to her annual family reunion with a mixture of excitement and wariness. Every year, she and her siblings return to their parents’ home outside Minneapolis to attend the state fair. This year, things are different. As soon as she arrives, Laura realizes that something is not right with her sister Caroline. On their first evening together, Caroline confronts Laura and their brother Steve with devastating allegations about their mother. Taken aback and incredulous, the siblings are unable to reconcile their perception of their childhood. A sudden tragedy forces them to face the past, their own culpability and their need for love and forgiveness.



16 ) We Are All Welcome Here

Review Website Ranks:

  • Goodreads: 10
  • Amazon: 7
  • LibraryThing: 27

It is the summer of 1964. In Tupelo, Mississippi, the town of Elvis’s birth, tensions are mounting over civil-rights demonstrations occurring ever more frequently-and violently-across the state. But in Paige Dunn’s small, ramshackle house, there are more immediate concerns. Challenged by the effects of the polio she contracted during her last month of pregnancy, Paige is nonetheless determined to live as normal a life as possible and to raise her daughter, Diana, in the way she sees fit-with the support of her tough-talking black caregiver, Peacie. Diana is trying in her own fashion to live a normal life. As a fourteen-year-old, she wants to make money for clothes and magazines, to slough off the authority of her mother and Peacie, to figure out the puzzle that is boys, and to escape the oppressiveness she sees everywhere in her small town. What she can never escape, however, is the way her life is markedly different from others’. Nor can she escape her ongoing responsibility to assist in caring for her mother. Paige Dunn is attractive, charming, intelligent, and lively, but her needs are great-and relentless. As the summer unfolds, hate and adversity will visit this modest home.



15 ) The Year of Pleasures

	The Year of Pleasures

Review Website Ranks:

  • Goodreads: 15
  • Amazon: 11
  • LibraryThing: 15

Betta Nolan moves to a small town after the death of her husband to try to begin life anew. Though still dealing with her sorrow, Betta nonetheless is determined to find pleasure in her simple daily routines. Among those who help her in both expected and unexpected ways are the ten-year-old boy next door, three wild women friends from her college days with whom she reconnects, a young man who is struggling to find his place in the world, and a handsome widower who is ready for love. Elizabeth Berg’s The Year of Pleasures is about acknowledging the solace found in ordinary things: a warm bath, good food, the beauty of nature, music, and art. Above all, The Year of Pleasures is about the various kindnesses people can – and do – provide one another. Betta’s journey from grief to joy is a meaningful reminder of what is available to us all, regardless of what fate has in store. This exquisite book suggests that no matter what we lose, life is ready to give bountifully to those who will receive.



13 ) Never Change

	Never Change

Review Website Ranks:

  • Goodreads: 12
  • Amazon: 13
  • LibraryThing: 14

A self-anointed spinster at fifty-one, Myra Lipinski is reasonably content with her quiet life, her dog, Frank, and her career as a visiting nurse. But everything changes when Chip Reardon, the golden boy she adored in high school, is assigned as her new patient. Choosing to forgo treatment for an incurable illness, Chip has returned to his New England hometown to spend what time he has left. Now, Myra and Chip find themselves engaged in a poignant redefinition of roles, and a complicated dance of memory, ambivalence, and longing.



13 ) The Day I Ate Everything I Wanted

	The Day I Ate Everything I Wanted

Review Website Ranks:

  • Goodreads: 20
  • Amazon: 7
  • LibraryThing: 12

Every now and then, right in the middle of an ordinary day, a woman kicks up her heels and commits a small act of liberation. What would you do if you could shed the “shoulds” and do, say – and eat – whatever you really desired? Go AWOL from Weight Watchers and spend an entire day eating every single thing you want? Start a dating service for people over fifty to reclaim the razzle-dazzle in your life – or your marriage? Seek comfort in the face of aging, look for love in the midst of loss, find friendship in the most surprising of places? In these beautiful, funny stories, Elizabeth Berg takes us into the heart of the lives of women who do all these things and more – confronting their true feelings, desires, and joys along the way.



12 ) Joy School

	Joy School

Review Website Ranks:

  • Goodreads: 13
  • Amazon: 17
  • LibraryThing: 8

A luminous tale of love and loss In this exquisite new novel by bestselling writer Elizabeth Berg, a young girl falls in love – and learns how sorrow can lead to an understanding of joy. Katie has moved to Missouri with her distant, occasionally abusive father. She feels very alone: her much-loved mother is dead; she finds it difficult to settle in, in her new school and her only friends fall far short of being ideal companions. When she falls through the ice while skating, she meets Jimmy. He is handsome, older than her, and married, but she is entranced. As their relationship unfolds, so too does Katie’s awareness of the pain and intensity first love can bring. Beautifully written in Berg’s irresistible voice, Joy School portrays the soaring happiness of real love, the deep despair felt when it goes unrequited, and the stubbornness of hope that will not let go. Joy School illuminates how the things that hurt the most can sometimes teach us the lessons that really matter.



11 ) Durable Goods

Review Website Ranks:

  • Goodreads: 11
  • Amazon: 16
  • LibraryThing: 9

On the hot Texas army base she calls home, Katie spends the lazy days of her summer waiting: waiting to grow up; waiting for Dickie Mack to fall in love with her; waiting for her breasts to blossom; waiting for the beatings to stop. Since their mother died, Katie and her older sister, Diane, have struggled to understand their increasingly distant, often violent father. While Diane escapes into the arms of her boyfriend, Katie hides in her room or escapes to her best friend’s house – until Katie’s admiration for her strong-willed sister leads her on an adventure that transforms her life. Written with an unerring ability to capture the sadness of growth, the pain of change, the nearly visible vibrations that connect people, this beautiful novel reminds us how wonderful – and wounding – a deeper understanding of life can be.



10 ) The Pull of the Moon

Review Website Ranks:

  • Goodreads: 13
  • Amazon: 13
  • LibraryThing: 9

Dear Martin, I’m sorry the note I left you was so abrupt. I just wanted you to know I was safe… I won’t be back for a while. I’m on a trip. I needed all of a sudden to go, without saying where, because I don’t know where. I know this is not like me. I know that,. But please believe me, I am safe and I am not crazy. I felt as though if I didn’t do this I wouldn’t be safe and I would be crazy… And can you believe this? I love you. Nan’ Sometimes you have to leave your life behind for a while to see it and really live it freshly again. In this luminous, exquisitely written novel, a woman follows the pull of the moon to find her way home. Sometimes humorous, sometimes heartbreaking, always honest, The Pull of the Moon is a novel about the journey of one woman – and about the issues of the heart that transforms the lives of all women.



9 ) Range of Motion

Review Website Ranks:

  • Goodreads: 8
  • Amazon: 11
  • LibraryThing: 11

I can tell you how it happened. It’s easy to say how it happened. He walked past a building, and a huge chunk of ice fell off the roof, and it hit him in the head. This is Chaplinesque, right? People start to laugh when I tell them…’ As Jay Berman lingers in a coma, his young wife, Lainey, is the only one who believes he will recover. While he lies motionless, she hopes to reach him by offering reminders of the ordinary life they shared – sweet-smelling flowers, his softly textured shirt, spices from their kitchen. And throughout her ordeal, Lainey is sustained by her relationship with two very special women, each of whom teaches her about the enduring bond of friendship and the genuine power of hope.



8 ) Still Happy

	Still Happy

Review Website Ranks:

  • Goodreads: 1
  • Amazon: 1
  • LibraryThing: 27

Still Happy is Elizabeth’s second collection of Facebook posts. Her first, Make Someone Happy, did indeed make many people happy, and so, due to popular demand, she has put together a second volume, which includes “The Book of Homer”, a tribute to her beloved dog who recently died. Still Happy, like Make Someone Happy, exemplifies Berg’s gift, as the Boston Globe said, “in her ability to find the extraordinary in the ordinary, the remarkable in the everyday.”



7 ) What We Keep

	What We Keep

Review Website Ranks:

  • Goodreads: 8
  • Amazon: 13
  • LibraryThing: 7

Do you ever really know your mother, your daughter, the people in your family? In this rich and rewarding new novel by the beloved bestselling author of Talk Before Sleep and The Pull of the Moon, a reunion between two sisters and their mother reveals how the secrets and complexities of the past have shaped the lives of the women in a family. Ginny Young is on a plane, en route to see her mother, whom she hasn’t seen or spoken to for thirty-five years. She thinks back to the summer of 1958, when she and her sister, Sharla, were young girls. At that time,a series of dramatic events–beginning with the arrival of a mysterious and sensual next-door neighbor–divided the family, separating the sisters from their mother.



6 ) True to Form

	True to Form

Review Website Ranks:

  • Goodreads: 6
  • Amazon: 7
  • LibraryThing: 13

In this warm and engaging novel, New York Times bestselling author Elizabeth Berg revisits the heroine she so lovingly brought to life in Durable Goods and Joy School. It is 1961, and thirteen-year-old Katie is facing a summer full of conflict. First, instead of letting her find her own work for the season, Katie’s father has arranged for two less than ideal baby-sitting jobs. Worse, Katie has been forcibly inducted into the ‘loser’ Girl Scout troop organized by her only friend Cynthia’s controlling and clueless mother. A much anticipated visit to her former home in Texas and ex-best friend Cherylanne proves disappointing. And then comes an act of betrayal that leaves Katie questioning her views on friendship, on her ability not to take those she loves for granted, and most important, on herself. Full of anguish and the joys of adolescence in a much more innocent time, True to Form is sure to make readers remember and reflect upon their own moments of discovery and self-definition.



5 ) Ordinary Life

	Ordinary Life

Review Website Ranks:

  • Goodreads: 7
  • Amazon: 7
  • LibraryThing: 5

The characters in Ordinary Life, Elizabeth Berg’s collection of limpid, gemlike stories, are poised at the edge of knowing, and it takes only quiet events–a kiss, the return of a freed bird–to nudge them toward whatever they need to face, even if it is behind them. The title story, in which an elderly woman named Mavis McPherson locks herself in the bathroom for a week, contains the germ of Berg’s message about the importance of the small, the everyday. Mavis’s urge to retreat began when she found a photograph from 1946 of her husband and brother-in-law asleep. Behind them was a table, on which sat a porcelain figure, now broken, that had been her mother’s. She’d wished she had more pictures of everything she used to have, thought Mavis, all her furniture, even her old refrigerator, and what was in it, too: the big, square blocks of butter in the ribbed glass container, the old flowered mixing bowls she used to have holding leftovers, covered with waxed paper and anchored with rubber bands.



4 ) Escaping into the Open

	Escaping into the Open

Review Website Ranks:

  • Goodreads: 4
  • Amazon: 5
  • LibraryThing: 6

Elizabeth Berg touches women’s lives with heartbreakingly funny and true novels — including the New York Times bestseller Talk Before Sleep — that distinctly capture the essence of their lives. Now this critically acclaimed author and writing instructor offers an inspiring, practical handbook on the joys, challenges, and creative possibilities inherent in the writing life. Both autobiography and primer, Escaping into the Open interweaves Elizabeth Berg’s story of her own journey from working mother to published novelist with encouraging advice on how to create stories that spring from deep within the heart. With wit and honesty, Elizabeth Berg provides numerous exercises that will unleash individual creativity and access and utilize all of the senses. Most important, she tells how to fire passion — emotion — into writing itself; to break through personal barriers and reach one’s own outer limits and beyond.



3 ) Night of Miracles

	Night of Miracles

Review Website Ranks:

  • Goodreads: 5
  • Amazon: 5
  • LibraryThing: 3

The feel-good book of the year: a delightful novel of friendship, community, and the way small acts of kindness can change your life, by the bestselling author of The Story of Arthur Truluv Lucille Howard is getting on in years, but she stays busy. Thanks to the inspiration of her dearly departed friend Arthur Truluv, she has begun to teach baking classes, sharing the secrets to her delicious classic Southern yellow cake, the perfect pinwheel cookies, and other sweet essentials. Her classes have become so popular that she’s hired Iris, a new resident of Mason, Missouri, as an assistant. Iris doesn’t know how to bake but she needs to keep her mind off a big decision she sorely regrets. When a new family moves in next door and tragedy strikes, Lucille begins to look out for Lincoln, their son. Lincoln’s parents aren’t the only ones in town facing hard choices and uncertain futures. In these difficult times, the residents of Mason come together and find the true power of community – just when they need it the most.



2 ) The Story of Arthur Truluv

	The Story of Arthur Truluv

Review Website Ranks:

  • Goodreads: 3
  • Amazon: 2
  • LibraryThing: 2

Redemptive without being maudlin, this story of two misfits lucky to have found one another will tug at readers’ heartstrings.” – Booklist For the past six months, Arthur Moses’s days have looked the same: He tends to his rose garden and to Gordon, his cat, then rides the bus to the cemetery to visit his beloved late wife for lunch. The last thing Arthur would imagine is for one unlikely encounter to utterly transform his life. Eighteen-year-old Maddy Harris is an introspective girl who visits the cemetery to escape the other kids at school. One afternoon she joins Arthur – a gesture that begins a surprising friendship between two lonely souls. Moved by Arthur’s kindness and devotion, Maddy gives him the nickname “Truluv.” As Arthur’s neighbor Lucille moves into their orbit, the unlikely trio band together and, through heartache and hardships, help one another rediscover their own potential to start anew.



1 ) Make Someone Happy

Review Website Ranks:

  • Goodreads: 2
  • Amazon: 2
  • LibraryThing: 1

This is a collection of Elizabeth Berg’s most-loved Facebook posts. She was asked by many to put these short essays into book form, to create something to “take to the beach, or bed, or on an airplane”. Elizabeth and her friend, Phyllis Florin, happily complied, and they hope that their offering will be as welcome as flowers in a mailbox.



Elizabeth Berg’s Best Books



Elizabeth Berg Review Website Bibliography Rankings

BookGoodreadsAmazonLibraryThingOveral Rank
Make Someone Happy 2 2 1 1
The Story of Arthur Truluv 3 2 2 2
Night of Miracles 5 5 3 3
Escaping into the Open 4 5 6 4
Ordinary Life 7 7 5 5
True to Form 6 7 13 6
What We Keep 8 13 7 7
Still Happy 1 1 27 8
Range of Motion 8 11 11 9
The Pull of the Moon 13 13 9 10
Durable Goods 11 16 9 11
Joy School 13 17 8 12
Never Change 12 13 14 13
The Day I Ate Everything I Wanted 20 7 12 13
The Year of Pleasures 15 11 15 15
We Are All Welcome Here 10 7 27 16
The Art of Mending 27 4 16 17
Open House 15 18 19 18
Say When 17 18 19 19
Until the Real Thing Comes Along 18 23 16 20
Talk Before Sleep 27 28 4 21
Dream When You’re Feeling Blue 19 23 21 22
Tapestry of Fortunes 22 20 23 23
The Last Time I Saw You 23 20 22 23
Home Safe 21 27 18 25
The Handmaid and the Carpenter 25 22 26 26
The Dream Lover 24 26 24 27
Once Upon a Time, There Was You 26 23 25 27
The Confession Club 27 28 27 29

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