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Ranking Author Nalo Hopkinson’s Best Books (A Bibliography Countdown)

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“What are Nalo Hopkinson Best Books?” We looked at all of Hopkinson’s authored bibliography and ranked them against one another to answer that very question!

We took all of the books written by Nalo Hopkinson and looked at their Goodreads, Amazon, and LibraryThing scores, ranking them against one another to see which books came out on top. The books are ranked in our list below based on which titles have the highest overall score between all 3 review sites in comparison with all of the other books by the same author. The process isn’t super scientific and in reality, most books aren’t “better” than other books as much as they are just different. That being said, we do enjoy seeing where our favorites landed, and if you aren’t familiar with the author at all, the rankings can help you see what books might be best to start with.

The full ranking chart is also included below the countdown on the bottom of the page.

Happy Scrolling!



The Top Book’s Of Nalo Hopkinson



12 ) The Chaos

Review Website Ranks:

  • Goodreads: 12
  • Amazon: 11
  • LibraryThing: 11

“Sixteen-year-old Scotch struggles to fit in—at home she’s the perfect daughter, at school she’s provocatively sassy, and thanks to her mixed heritage, she doesn’t feel she belongs with the Caribbeans, whites, or blacks. And even more troubling, lately her skin is becoming covered in a sticky black substance that can’t be removed. While trying to cope with this creepiness, she goes out with her brother—and he disappears. A mysterious bubble of light just swallows him up, and Scotch has no idea how to find him. Soon, the Chaos that has claimed her brother affects the city at large, until it seems like everyone is turning into crazy creatures. Scotch needs to get to the bottom of this supernatural situation ASAP before the Chaos consumes everything she’s ever known—and she knows that the black shadowy entity that’s begun trailing her every move is probably not going to help.

A blend of fantasy and Caribbean folklore, at its heart this tale is about identity and self acceptance—because only by acknowledging her imperfections can Scotch hope to save her brother.”

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11 ) Sister Mine

Review Website Ranks:

  • Goodreads: 11
  • Amazon: 7
  • LibraryThing: 12

“We’d had to be cut free of our mother’s womb. She’d never have been able to push the two-headed sport that was me and Abby out the usual way. Abby and I were fused, you see. Conjoined twins. Abby’s head, torso, and left arm protruded from my chest. But here’s the real kicker; Abby had the magic, I didn’t. Far as the Family was concerned, Abby was one of them, though cursed, as I was, with the tragic flaw of mortality.

Now adults, Makeda and Abby still share their childhood home. The surgery to separate the two girls gave Abby a permanent limp, but left Makeda with what feels like an even worse deformity: no mojo. The daughters of a celestial demigod and a human woman, Makeda and Abby were raised by their magical father, the god of growing things–a highly unusual childhood that made them extremely close. Ever since Abby’s magical talent began to develop, though, in the form of an unearthly singing voice, the sisters have become increasingly distant.

Today, Makeda has decided it’s high time to move out and make her own life among the other nonmagical humans–after all, she’s one of them. In Cheerful Rest, a run-down warehouse space, Makeda finds exactly what she’s been looking for: an opportunity to live apart from Abby and begin building her own independent life. There’s even a resident band, led by the charismatic (and attractive) building superintendent.

But when her father goes missing, Makeda will have to discover her own talent–and reconcile with Abby–if she’s to have a hope of saving him . . .”

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10 ) So Long Been Dreaming

Review Website Ranks:

  • Goodreads: 5
  • Amazon: 12
  • LibraryThing: 8

” Stories of imagined futures abound in Western writing. Writer and editor Nalo Hopkinson notes that the science fiction/fantasy genre “speaks so much about the experience of being alienated but contains so little writing by alienated people themselves.” It’s an oversight that Hopkinson and Mehan aim to correct with this anthology.

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8 ) Midnight Robber

Review Website Ranks:

  • Goodreads: 6
  • Amazon: 8
  • LibraryThing: 9

Nalo Hopkinson’s first novel, Brown Girl in the Ring, was selected from almost 1,000 entries to win Warner Aspect’s First Novel Contest, and after publication it received the Locus Award for Best First Novel and was a finalist for the Philip K. Dick Award. So expectations have been pretty high for her second book, and Midnight Robber lives up to them; it’s a beautifully written, innovative, demanding, and wonderful novel. On the Caribbean-colonized planet of Toussaint, Carnival is a Lollapalooza of music and dance, a Mardi Gras, a masquerade; and the Robin Hood of Toussaint legend, the Robber Queen, is just another costume, Tan-Tan’s favorite.

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8 ) Brown Girl in the Ring

Review Website Ranks:

  • Goodreads: 8
  • Amazon: 5
  • LibraryThing: 10

The rich and privileged have fled the city, barricaded it behind roadblocks, and left it to crumble. The inner city has had to rediscover old ways–farming, barter, herb lore. But now the monied need a harvest of bodies, and so they prey upon the helpless of the streets. With nowhere to turn, a young woman must open herself to ancient truths, eternal powers, and the tragic mystery surrounding her mother and grandmother. She must bargain with gods, and give birth to new legends.

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7 ) The Salt Roads

Review Website Ranks:

  • Goodreads: 9
  • Amazon: 10
  • LibraryThing: 3

In beautiful prose, Nalo Hopkinson’s The Salt Roads tells how Ezili, the African goddess of love, becomes entangled in the lives of three women. Grief-powered prayers draw Ezili into the physical world, where she finds herself trapped by her lost memories and by the spiritual effects of the widespread evil of slavery. Her consciousness alternates among the bodies/minds of several women throughout time, but she resides mostly in three women: Mer, an Afro-Caribbean slave woman/midwife; Jeanne Duval, Afro-French lover of decadent Paris poet Charles Baudelaire; and Meritet, the Greek-Nubian slave/prostitute known to history as St. Mary of Egypt. Ezili becomes entangled with Mer because the midwife’s prayers helped draw her into the mortal world. The novel presents a reasonable, though undeveloped, connection between Meritet/St. Mary, the Virgin Mary, and the goddesses of Africa.

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6 ) The New Moon’s Arms

Review Website Ranks:

  • Goodreads: 7
  • Amazon: 5
  • LibraryThing: 3

When objects begin appearing out of nowhere, Calamity knows that the special gift she has not felt since childhood has returned-her ability to find lost things. Calamity, a woman as contrary as the tides around her Caribbean island home, is confronting two of life’s biggest dramas. First is the death of her father, who raised her alone until a pregnant Calamity rejected him when she was sixteen years old. The second drama: she’s starting menopause. Now when she has a hot flash and feels a tingling in her hands, she knows it’s a lost object calling to her.

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5 ) Skin Folk

Review Website Ranks:

  • Goodreads: 3
  • Amazon: 9
  • LibraryThing: 2

Award-winning author Nalo Hopkinson’s first collection is Skin Folk, and its 15 stories are as strong and beautiful as her novels. “The Glass Bottle Trick” retells the Bluebeard legend in a Caribbean setting and rhythms, for a sharp, chilling examination of love, gender, race, and class. In the myth-tinged “Money Tree,” a Canadian immigrant’s greed sends him back to Jamaica in pursuit of an accursed pirate treasure.

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3 ) Whispers from the Cotton Tree Root: Caribbean Fabulist Fiction

Review Website Ranks:

  • Goodreads: 10
  • Amazon: 2
  • LibraryThing: 1

The lushness of language and the landscape, wild contrasts, and pure storytelling magic abound in this anthology of Caribbean writing. Steeped in the tradition of fabulism, where the irrational and inexplicable coexist with the realities of daily life, the stories in this collection are infused with a vitality and freshness that most writing traditions have long ago lost. From spectral slaving ships to women who shed their skin at night to become owls, stories from writers such as Jamaica Kincaid, Marcia Douglas, Ian MacDonald, and Kamau Brathwaite pulse with rhythms, visions, and the tortured history of this spiritually rich region of the world.

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3 ) Falling in Love With Hominids

Review Website Ranks:

  • Goodreads: 4
  • Amazon: 2
  • LibraryThing: 7

In this collection of stories, “Hopkinson continues to expand the boundaries of culture and imagination. Whether she is retelling The Tempest as a new Caribbean myth, filling a shopping mall with unfulfilled ghosts, or herding chickens that occasionally breathe fire, Hopkinson continues to create … fiction that transcends boundaries and borders”

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2 ) Mojo: Conjure Stories

Review Website Ranks:

  • Goodreads: 1
  • Amazon: 2
  • LibraryThing: 6

Many Americans know “mojo” is Southern slang for powerful magic. But few Americans know the word originated in West Africa and referred to a small cloth bag containing protective magicks. The origin of mojo is as obscure to Americans as the religious, spiritual, and magical beliefs of Africa, which are far less familiar than the religions and myths of Europe and Asia. Acclaimed author/editor Nalo Hopkinson addresses this imbalance with her anthology Mojo: Conjure Stories, which collects 19 original stories of magic and gods and mortals, set in locales that range from a pre-Civil War plantation to modern Oakland, from Nineteenth-Century England to underground New York City.

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1 ) Report From Planet Midnight

Review Website Ranks:

  • Goodreads: 1
  • Amazon: 1
  • LibraryThing: 3

Infused with feminist, Afro-Caribbean views of the science fiction and fantasy genres, this collection of offbeat and highly original works takes aim at race and racism in literature. In “Report from Planet Midnight,” at the International Association of the Fantastic in the Arts, an alien addresses the crowd, evaluating Earth’s “strange” customs, including the marginalization of works by nonwhite and female writers. “Message in a Bottle” shows Greg, an American Indian artist, befriending a strange four-year-old who seems wise beyond her years. While preparing an exhibition, he discovers that the young girl is a traveler from the future sent to recover art from the distant past—which apparently includes his own work. Concluding the book with series editor Terry Bisson’s Outspoken Interview, Nalo Hopkinson shares laughs, loves, and top-secret Caribbean spells.

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Nalo Hopkinson’s Best Books



Nalo Hopkinson Review Website Bibliography Rankings

BookGoodreadsAmazonLibraryThingOveral Rank
Report From Planet Midnight 113 1
Mojo: Conjure Stories 126 2
Whispers from the Cotton Tree Root: Caribbean Fabulist Fiction 1021 3
Falling in Love With Hominids 427 3
Skin Folk 392 5
The New Moon’s Arms 753 6
The Salt Roads 9103 7
Midnight Robber 689 8
Brown Girl in the Ring 8510 8
So Long Been Dreaming 5128 10
Sister Mine 11712 11
The Chaos 121111 12