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The Best Books All Categories of 2017 (A Year-End List Aggregation)

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“What are the Best Books of 2017?” We aggregated 72 year-end lists and ranked the 830 unique titles by how many times they appeared in an attempt to answer that very question!

There are thousands of year-end lists released every year and like we do in our weekly Best Book articles, we wanted to see which books appear the most. This is a new category that we added for 2017. Normally we split up the lists into the different subjects (fiction, nonfiction, history, art, etc.), but there are several lists released that don’t split the books up by subject, so we decided to add this all-encompassing article that aggregated those lists. It ended up overlapping a lot with the Best Fiction & Best Nonfiction book lists for 2017, but there are also some additional titles that found their way into this list as well. The top 36 books, all of which appeared on 5 or more best book lists, are ranked below with images, summaries, and links for more information or to purchase. The remaining 775+ books, as well as the top book lists, are at the bottom of the page.

Make sure to take a look at our other Best of 2017 book lists:

You can also take a look at our Best 2016 articles from last year!

Happy Scrolling!

 



Top 36 Books Of 2017



36 .) Beartown by Fredrik Backman

Lists It Appears On:

  • Indigo’s Books
  • Kate’s Kairos
  • Library Reads
  • Sarah’s Book Shelves
  • The Paperback Princess

From the New York Times bestselling author of A Man Called Ove My Grandmother Asked Me To Tell You She s Sorry and Britt Marie Was Here comes a poignant charming novel about a forgotten town fractured by scandal and the amateur hockey team that might just change everything Winning a junior ice hockey championship might not mean a lot to the average person but it means everything to the residents of Beartown a community slowly being eaten alive by unemployment and the surrounding wilderness A victory like this would draw national attention to the ailing town it could attract government funding and an influx of talented athletes who would choose Beartown over the big nearby cities A victory like this would certainly mean everything to Amat a short scrawny teenager who is treated like an outcast everywhere but on the ice to Kevin a star player just on the cusp of securing his golden future in the NHL and to Peter their dedicated general manager whose own professional hockey career ended in tragedy At first it seems like the team might have a shot at fulfilling the dreams of their entire town But one night at a drunken celebration following a key win something happens between Kevin and the general manager s daughter and the next day everything seems to have changed Accusations are made and like ripples on a pond they travel through all of Beartown leaving no resident unaffected With so much riding on the success of the team the line between loyalty and betrayal becomes difficult to discern At last it falls to one young man to find the courage to speak the truth that it seems no one else wants to hear Fredrik Backman knows that we are forever shaped by the places we call home and in this emotionally powerful sweetly insightful story he explores what can happen when we carry the heavy weight of other people s dreams on our shoulders

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35 .) Goodbye, Vitamin by Rachel Khong

Lists It Appears On:

  • BKLYN
  • Esquire
  • Publishers Weekly 2
  • The Cut
  • Women

“Freshly disengaged from her fiancé and feeling that life has not turned out quite the way she planned, thirty-year-old Ruth quits her job, leaves town and arrives at her parents’ home to find that situation more complicated than she’d realized. Her father, a prominent history professor, is losing his memory and is only erratically lucid. Ruth’s mother, meanwhile, is lucidly erratic. But as Ruth’s father’s condition intensifies, the comedy in her situation takes hold, gently transforming her all her grief.

Told in captivating glimpses and drawn from a deep well of insight, humor, and unexpected tenderness, Goodbye, Vitamin pilots through the loss, love, and absurdity of finding one’s footing in this life.”

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34 .) Home Fire by Kamila Shamsie

Lists It Appears On:

  • Book Page
  • Dont Mind The Mess
  • Library Journal
  • The Guardian
  • The Guardian 2

“Isma is free. After years of watching out for her younger siblings in the wake of their mother’s death, she’s accepted an invitation from a mentor in America that allows her to resume a dream long deferred. But she can’t stop worrying about Aneeka, her beautiful, headstrong sister back in London, or their brother, Parvaiz, who’s disappeared in pursuit of his own dream, to prove himself to the dark legacy of the jihadist father he never knew. When he resurfaces half a globe away, Isma’s worst fears are confirmed.

Then Eamonn enters the sisters’ lives. Son of a powerful political figure, he has his own birthright to live up to—or defy. Is he to be a chance at love? The means of Parvaiz’s salvation? Suddenly, two families’ fates are inextricably, devastatingly entwined, in this searing novel that asks: What sacrifices will we make in the name of love?”

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33 .) Leonardo da Vinci by Walter Isaacson

Lists It Appears On:

  • BKLYN
  • Book Page
  • Do Lectures
  • The East Hampton Star
  • USA Today

“Based on thousands of pages from Leonardo’s astonishing notebooks and new discoveries about his life and work, Walter Isaacson weaves a narrative that connects his art to his science. He shows how Leonardo’s genius was based on skills we can improve in ourselves, such as passionate curiosity, careful observation, and an imagination so playful that it flirted with fantasy.

He produced the two most famous paintings in history, The Last Supper and the Mona Lisa. But in his own mind, he was just as much a man of science and technology. With a passion that sometimes became obsessive, he pursued innovative studies of anatomy, fossils, birds, the heart, flying machines, botany, geology, and weaponry. His ability to stand at the crossroads of the humanities and the sciences, made iconic by his drawing of Vitruvian Man, made him history’s most creative genius.

His creativity, like that of other great innovators, came from having wide-ranging passions. He peeled flesh off the faces of cadavers, drew the muscles that move the lips, and then painted history’s most memorable smile. He explored the math of optics, showed how light rays strike the cornea, and produced illusions of changing perspectives in The Last Supper. Isaacson also describes how Leonardo’s lifelong enthusiasm for staging theatrical productions informed his paintings and inventions.”

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32 .) Reservoir 13 by Jon McGregor

Lists It Appears On:

  • BKLYN
  • Net Galley
  • The Guardian
  • The Guardian 2
  • The Los Angeles Review

“Midwinter in an English village. A teenage girl has gone missing. Everyone is called upon to join the search. The villagers fan out across the moors as the police set up roadblocks and a crowd of news reporters descends on what is usually a place of peace. Meanwhile, there is work that must still be done: cows milked, fences repaired, stone cut, pints poured, beds made, sermons written, a pantomime rehearsed.

As the seasons unfold and the search for the missing girl goes on, there are those who leave the village and those who are pulled back; those who come together and those who break apart. There are births and deaths; secrets kept and exposed; livelihoods made and lost; small kindnesses and unanticipated betrayals. An extraordinary novel of cumulative power and grace, Reservoir 13 explores the rhythms of the natural world and the repeated human gift for violence, unfolding over thirteen years as the aftershocks of a tragedy refuse to subside.”

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31 .) The Lonely Hearts Hotel by Heather O’Neill

Lists It Appears On:

  • Heavy
  • Indigo’s Books
  • Maisonneuve
  • Now Toronto
  • The Coil

“The Lonely Hearts Hotel is a love story with the power of legend. An unparalleled tale of charismatic pianos, invisible dance partners, radicalized chorus girls, drug-addicted musicians, brooding clowns, and an underworld whose economy hinges on the price of a kiss. In a landscape like this, it takes great creative gifts to thwart one’s origins. It might also take true love.

Two babies are abandoned in a Montreal orphanage in the winter of 1914. Before long, their talents emerge: Pierrot is a piano prodigy; Rose lights up even the dreariest room with her dancing and comedy. As they travel around the city performing clown routines, the children fall in love with each other and dream up a plan for the most extraordinary and seductive circus show the world has ever seen.

Separated as teenagers, sent off to work as servants during the Great Depression, both descend into the city’s underworld, dabbling in sex, drugs and theft in order to survive. But when Rose and Pierrot finally reunite beneath the snowflakes – after years of searching and desperate poverty – the possibilities of their childhood dreams are renewed, and they’ll go to extreme lengths to make them come true. Soon, Rose, Pierrot and their troupe of clowns and chorus girls have hit New York, commanding the stage as well as the alleys, and neither the theater nor the underworld will ever look the same.”

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30 .) The Rules Do Not Apply by Ariel Levy

Lists It Appears On:

  • The Cut
  • The Guardian 2
  • The Stranger
  • The Week
  • Women

“When Ariel Levy left for a reporting trip to Mongolia in 2012, she was pregnant, married, financially secure, and successful on her own terms. A month later, none of that was true.

Levy picks you up and hurls you through the story of how she built an unconventional life and then watched it fall apart with astonishing speed. Like much of her generation, she was raised to resist traditional rules—about work, about love, and about womanhood.

In this “deeply human and deeply moving” (The New York Times Book Review) memoir, Levy chronicles the adventure and heartbreak of being, in her own words, “a woman who is free to do whatever she chooses.” Her story of resilience becomes an unforgettable portrait of the shifting forces in our culture, of what has changed—and of what is eternal.

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29 .) This is How It Always Is by Laurie Frankel

Lists It Appears On:

  • Bustle
  • Novels + Nonfiction
  • People
  • Sarah’s Book Shelves
  • The Stranger

“This is how a family keeps a secret…and how that secret ends up keeping them.

This is how a family lives happily ever after…until happily ever after becomes complicated.

This is how children change…and then change the world.

This is Claude. He’s five years old, the youngest of five brothers, and loves peanut butter sandwiches. He also loves wearing a dress, and dreams of being a princess.

When he grows up, Claude says, he wants to be a girl.

Rosie and Penn want Claude to be whoever Claude wants to be. They’re just not sure they’re ready to share that with the world. Soon the entire family is keeping Claude’s secret. Until one day it explodes.

Laurie Frankel’s This Is How It Always Is is a novel about revelations, transformations, fairy tales, and family. And it’s about the ways this is how it always is: Change is always hard and miraculous and hard again, parenting is always a leap into the unknown with crossed fingers and full hearts, children grow but not always according to plan. And families with secrets don’t get to keep them forever.”

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28 .) Transit by Rachel Cusk

Lists It Appears On:

  • Maisonneuve
  • Now Toronto
  • The Cut
  • The Guardian 2
  • Washington Independent

“In the wake of her family’s collapse, a writer and her two young sons move to London. The process of this upheaval is the catalyst for a number of transitions―personal, moral, artistic, and practical―as she endeavors to construct a new reality for herself and her children. In the city, she is made to confront aspects of living that she has, until now, avoided, and to consider questions of vulnerability and power, death and renewal, in what becomes her struggle to reattach herself to, and believe in, life.

Filtered through the impersonal gaze of its keenly intelligent protagonist, Transit sees Rachel Cusk delve deeper into the themes first raised in her critically acclaimed novel Outline and offers up a penetrating and moving reflection on childhood and fate, the value of suffering, the moral problems of personal responsibility, and the mystery of change.

In this second book of a precise, short, yet epic cycle, Cusk describes the most elemental experiences, the liminal qualities of life. She captures with unsettling restraint and honesty the longing to both inhabit and flee one’s life, and the wrenching ambivalence animating our desire to feel real.”

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27 .) We Are Never Meeting in Real Life by Samantha Irby

Lists It Appears On:

  • Brooklyn Based
  • Esquire
  • Heauxs
  • The Los Angeles Review
  • The Root

With We Are Never Meeting in Real Life., “bitches gotta eat” blogger and comedian Samantha Irby turns the serio-comic essay into an art form. Whether talking about how her difficult childhood has led to a problem in making “adult” budgets, explaining why she should be the new Bachelorette—she’s “35-ish, but could easily pass for 60-something”—detailing a disastrous pilgrimage-slash-romantic-vacation to Nashville to scatter her estranged father’s ashes, sharing awkward sexual encounters, or dispensing advice on how to navigate friendships with former drinking buddies who are now suburban moms—hang in there for the Costco loot—she’s as deft at poking fun at the ghosts of her past self as she is at capturing powerful emotional truths.

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26 .) What It Means When a Man Falls From the Sky by Lesley Nneka Arimah

Lists It Appears On:

  • BKLYN
  • Cosmopolitan
  • Culture Fly
  • The Guardian 2
  • The Root

In “Who Will Greet You at Home,” a National Magazine Award finalist for The New Yorker, A woman desperate for a child weaves one out of hair, with unsettling results. In “Wild,” a disastrous night out shifts a teenager and her Nigerian cousin onto uneasy common ground. In “The Future Looks Good,” three generations of women are haunted by the ghosts of war, while in “Light,” a father struggles to protect and empower the daughter he loves. And in the title story, in a world ravaged by flood and riven by class, experts have discovered how to “fix the equation of a person” – with rippling, unforeseen repercussions.

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25 .) White Tears by Hari Kunzru

Lists It Appears On:

  • Dont Mind The Mess
  • Houstonia
  • Nick The Writer
  • Publishers Weekly
  • Slate 2

Two twenty-something New Yorkers. Seth is awkward and shy. Carter is the glamorous heir to one of America’s great fortunes. They have one thing in common: an obsession with music. Seth is desperate to reach for the future. Carter is slipping back into the past. When Seth accidentally records an unknown singer in a park, Carter sends it out over the Internet, claiming it’s a long lost 1920s blues recording by a musician called Charlie Shaw. When an old collector contacts them to say that their fake record and their fake bluesman are actually real, the two young white men, accompanied by Carter’s troubled sister Leonie, spiral down into the heart of the nation’s darkness, encountering a suppressed history of greed, envy, revenge, and exploitation.

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24 .) You Don’t Have To Say You Love Me by Sherman Alexie

Lists It Appears On:

  • BBC Culture
  • Book Page
  • Library Journal
  • New York Public Library
  • Star Tribune

Family relationships are never simple. But Sherman Alexie’s bond with his mother Lillian was more complex than most. She plunged her family into chaos with a drinking habit, but shed her addiction when it was on the brink of costing her everything. She survived a violent past, but created an elaborate facade to hide the truth. She selflessly cared for strangers, but was often incapable of showering her children with the affection that they so desperately craved. She wanted a better life for her son, but it was only by leaving her behind that he could hope to achieve it. It’s these contradictions that made Lillian Alexie a beautiful, mercurial, abusive, intelligent, complicated, and very human woman.

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23 .) American War by Omar El Akkad

Lists It Appears On:

  • Girl Reporter
  • Macleans
  • Maisonneuve
  • Novels + Nonfiction
  • The Cornell Daily Sun
  • The Guardian 2

“An audacious and powerful debut novel: a second American Civil War, a devastating plague, and one family caught deep in the middle—a story that asks what might happen if America were to turn its most devastating policies and deadly weapons upon itself.

Sarat Chestnut, born in Louisiana, is only six when the Second American Civil War breaks out in 2074. But even she knows that oil is outlawed, that Louisiana is half underwater, and that unmanned drones fill the sky. When her father is killed and her family is forced into Camp Patience for displaced persons, she begins to grow up shaped by her particular time and place. But not everyone at Camp Patience is who they claim to be. Eventually Sarat is befriended by a mysterious functionary, under whose influence she is turned into a deadly instrument of war. The decisions that she makes will have tremendous consequences not just for Sarat but for her family and her country, rippling through generations of strangers and kin alike.”

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22 .) Anything Is Possible by Elizabeth Strout

Lists It Appears On:

  • People
  • The Guardian
  • The Guardian 2
  • The Seattle Times
  • USA Today
  • Washington Independent

“Recalling Olive Kitteridge in its richness, structure, and complexity, Anything Is Possible explores the whole range of human emotion through the intimate dramas of people struggling to understand themselves and others.

Here are two sisters: One trades self-respect for a wealthy husband while the other finds in the pages of a book a kindred spirit who changes her life. The janitor at the local school has his faith tested in an encounter with an isolated man he has come to help; a grown daughter longs for mother love even as she comes to accept her mother’s happiness in a foreign country; and the adult Lucy Barton (the heroine of My Name Is Lucy Barton, the author’s celebrated New York Times bestseller) returns to visit her siblings after seventeen years of absence.

Reverberating with the deep bonds of family, and the hope that comes with reconciliation, Anything Is Possible again underscores Elizabeth Strout’s place as one of America’s most respected and cherished authors.”

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21 .) The Best We Could Do by Thi Bui

Lists It Appears On:

  • New York Public Library
  • Star Tribune
  • The Cut
  • The Guardian
  • The Paperback Princess
  • The Stranger

“This beautifully illustrated and emotional story is an evocative memoir about the search for a better future and a longing for the past. Exploring the anguish of immigration and the lasting effects that displacement has on a child and her family, Bui documents the story of her family’s daring escape after the fall of South Vietnam in the 1970s, and the difficulties they faced building new lives for themselves.

At the heart of Bui’s story is a universal struggle: While adjusting to life as a first-time mother, she ultimately discovers what it means to be a parent—the endless sacrifices, the unnoticed gestures, and the depths of unspoken love. Despite how impossible it seems to take on the simultaneous roles of both parent and child, Bui pushes through. With haunting, poetic writing and breathtaking art, she examines the strength of family, the importance of identity, and the meaning of home.”

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20 .) The Idiot by Elif Batuman

Lists It Appears On:

  • Book Page
  • Slate
  • The Cornell Daily Sun
  • The Cut
  • The Guardian 2
  • Vulture

“The year is 1995, and email is new. Selin, the daughter of Turkish immigrants, arrives for her freshman year at Harvard. She signs up for classes in subjects she has never heard of, befriends her charismatic and worldly Serbian classmate, Svetlana, and, almost by accident, begins corresponding with Ivan, an older mathematics student from Hungary. Selin may have barely spoken to Ivan, but with each email they exchange, the act of writing seems to take on new and increasingly mysterious meanings.

At the end of the school year, Ivan goes to Budapest for the summer, and Selin heads to the Hungarian countryside, to teach English in a program run by one of Ivan’s friends. On the way, she spends two weeks visiting Paris with Svetlana. Selin’s summer in Europe does not resonate with anything she has previously heard about the typical experiences of American college students, or indeed of any other kinds of people. For Selin, this is a journey further inside herself: a coming to grips with the ineffable and exhilarating confusion of first love, and with the growing consciousness that she is doomed to become a writer.

With superlative emotional and intellectual sensitivity, mordant wit, and pitch-perfect style, Batuman dramatizes the uncertainty of life on the cusp of adulthood. Her prose is a rare and inimitable combination of tenderness and wisdom; its logic as natural and inscrutable as that of memory itself. The Idiot is a heroic yet self-effacing reckoning with the terror and joy of becoming a person in a world that is as intoxicating as it is disquieting. Batuman’s fiction is unguarded against both life’s affronts and its beauty–and has at its command the complete range of thinking and feeling which they entail.”

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19 .) The Ministry of Utmost Happiness by Arundhati Roy

Lists It Appears On:

  • Bustle
  • Esquire
  • Newsday
  • Nick The Writer
  • Now Toronto
  • The Week

“The Ministry of Utmost Happiness takes us on an intimate journey of many years across the Indian subcontinent—from the cramped neighborhoods of Old Delhi and the roads of the new city to the mountains and valleys of Kashmir and beyond, where war is peace and peace is war.

It is an aching love story and a decisive remonstration, a story told in a whisper, in a shout, through unsentimental tears and sometimes with a bitter laugh. Each of its characters is indelibly, tenderly rendered. Its heroes are people who have been broken by the world they live in and then rescued, patched together by acts of love—and by hope.

The tale begins with Anjum—who used to be Aftab—unrolling a threadbare Persian carpet in a city graveyard she calls home. We encounter the odd, unforgettable Tilo and the men who loved her—including Musa, sweetheart and ex-sweetheart, lover and ex-lover; their fates are as entwined as their arms used to be and always will be. We meet Tilo’s landlord, a former suitor, now an intelligence officer posted to Kabul. And then we meet the two Miss Jebeens: the first a child born in Srinagar and buried in its overcrowded Martyrs’ Graveyard; the second found at midnight, abandoned on a concrete sidewalk in the heart of New Delhi.”

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18 .) What Happened by Hillary Rodham Clinton

Lists It Appears On:

  • Bustle
  • Cosmopolitan
  • Novels + Nonfiction
  • Slate
  • The Paperback Princess
  • The Stranger

“For the first time, Hillary Rodham Clinton reveals what she was thinking and feeling during one of the most controversial and unpredictable presidential elections in history. Now free from the constraints of running, Hillary takes you inside the intense personal experience of becoming the first woman nominated for president by a major party in an election marked by rage, sexism, exhilarating highs and infuriating lows, stranger-than-fiction twists, Russian interference, and an opponent who broke all the rules. This is her most personal memoir yet.

In these pages, she describes what it was like to run against Donald Trump, the mistakes she made, how she has coped with a shocking and devastating loss, and how she found the strength to pick herself back up afterward. With humor and candor, she tells readers what it took to get back on her feet—the rituals, relationships, and reading that got her through, and what the experience has taught her about life. She speaks about the challenges of being a strong woman in the public eye, the criticism over her voice, age, and appearance, and the double standard confronting women in politics.”

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17 .) Autumn by Ali Smith

Lists It Appears On:

  • Esquire
  • New York Public Library
  • Slate 2
  • The Bottle Imp
  • The Guardian
  • The Guardian 2
  • The New York Times

“Autumn. Season of mists and mellow fruitfulness. Two old friends—Daniel, a centenarian, and Elisabeth, born in 1984—look to both the future and the past as the United Kingdom stands divided by a historic, once-in-a-generation summer. Love is won, love is lost. Hope is hand-in-hand with hopelessness. The seasons roll round, as ever.

A luminous meditation on the meaning of richness and harvest and worth, Autumn is the first installment of Ali Smith’s Seasonal quartet, and it casts an eye over our own time: Who are we? What are we made of? Shakespearean jeu d’esprit, Keatsian melancholy, the sheer bright energy of 1960s pop art. Wide-ranging in time-scale and light-footed through histories, Autumn is an unforgettable story about aging and time and love—and stories themselves.”

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16 .) Her Body and Other Parties: Stories by Carmen Maria Machado

Lists It Appears On:

  • Bustle
  • Dont Mind The Mess
  • Publishers Weekly 2
  • Slate
  • The Cut
  • The Los Angeles Review
  • Washington Independent

“In Her Body and Other Parties, Carmen Maria Machado blithely demolishes the arbitrary borders between psychological realism and science fiction, comedy and horror, fantasy and fabulism. While her work has earned her comparisons to Karen Russell and Kelly Link, she has a voice that is all her own. In this electric and provocative debut, Machado bends genre to shape startling narratives that map the realities of women’s lives and the violence visited upon their bodies.

A wife refuses her husband’s entreaties to remove the green ribbon from around her neck. A woman recounts her sexual encounters as a plague slowly consumes humanity. A salesclerk in a mall makes a horrifying discovery within the seams of the store’s prom dresses. One woman’s surgery-induced weight loss results in an unwanted houseguest. And in the bravura novella “Especially Heinous,” Machado reimagines every episode of Law & Order: Special Victims Unit, a show we naïvely assumed had shown it all, generating a phantasmagoric police procedural full of doppelgängers, ghosts, and girls with bells for eyes.

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15 .) Sour Heart by Jenny Zhang

Lists It Appears On:

  • AV Club
  • BKLYN
  • Cosmopolitan
  • Esquire
  • Publishers Weekly 2
  • The Guardian
  • Vulture

“A fresh new voice emerges with the arrival of Sour Heart, establishing Jenny Zhang as a frank and subversive interpreter of the immigrant experience in America. Her stories cut across generations and continents, moving from the fraught halls of a public school in Flushing, Queens, to the tumultuous streets of Shanghai, China, during the Cultural Revolution of the 1960s. In the absence of grown-ups, latchkey kids experiment on each other until one day the experiments turn violent; an overbearing mother abandons her artistic aspirations to come to America but relives her glory days through karaoke; and a shy loner struggles to master English so she can speak to God.

Narrated by the daughters of Chinese immigrants who fled imperiled lives as artists back home only to struggle to stay afloat—dumpster diving for food and scamming Atlantic City casino buses to make a buck—these seven stories showcase Zhang’s compassion, moral courage, and a perverse sense of humor reminiscent of Portnoy’s Complaint. A darkly funny and intimate rendering of girlhood, Sour Heart examines what it means to belong to a family, to find your home, leave it, reject it, and return again.”

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14 .) What We Lose by Zinzi Clemmons

Lists It Appears On:

  • AV Club
  • Cosmopolitan
  • Media Diversified
  • The Berry
  • The Los Angeles Review
  • The Root
  • Women

“Raised in Pennsylvania, Thandi views the world of her mother’s childhood in Johannesburg as both impossibly distant and ever present. She is an outsider wherever she goes, caught between being black and white, American and not. She tries to connect these dislocated pieces of her life, and as her mother succumbs to cancer, Thandi searches for an anchor—someone, or something, to love.

In arresting and unsettling prose, we watch Thandi’s life unfold, from losing her mother and learning to live without the person who has most profoundly shaped her existence, to her own encounters with romance and unexpected motherhood. Through exquisite and emotional vignettes, Clemmons creates a stunning portrayal of what it means to choose to live, after loss. An elegiac distillation, at once intellectual and visceral, of a young woman’s understanding of absence and identity that spans continents and decades, What We Lose heralds the arrival of a virtuosic new voice in fiction.”

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13 .) The Book of Dust volume One: La Belle Sauvage by Philip Pullman

Lists It Appears On:

  • AV Club
  • Simon McDonald
  • Slate
  • The Guardian
  • The Guardian 2
  • The Guardian 2
  • The Week
  • Waterstones

“Malcolm Polstead is the kind of boy who notices everything but is not much noticed himself. And so perhaps it was inevitable that he would become a spy….

Malcolm’s parents run an inn called the Trout, on the banks of the river Thames, and all of Oxford passes through its doors. Malcolm and his daemon, Asta, routinely overhear news and gossip, and the occasional scandal, but during a winter of unceasing rain, Malcolm catches wind of something new: intrigue.

He finds a secret message inquiring about a dangerous substance called Dust—and the spy it was intended for finds him.

When she asks Malcolm to keep his eyes open, he sees suspicious characters everywhere: the explorer Lord Asriel, clearly on the run; enforcement agents from the Magisterium; a gyptian named Coram with warnings just for Malcolm; and a beautiful woman with an evil monkey for a daemon. All are asking about the same thing: a girl—just a baby—named Lyra.

Lyra is the kind of person who draws people in like magnets. And Malcolm will brave any danger, and make shocking sacrifices, to bring her safely through the storm.”

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12 .) We Were Eight Years in Power by Ta-Nehisi Coates

Lists It Appears On:

  • BKLYN
  • Esquire
  • Houstonia
  • Macleans
  • Publishers Weekly 2
  • The Coker Family
  • The Cornell Daily Sun
  • The Root
  • USA Today

But the story of these present-day eight years is not just about presidential politics. This book also examines the new voices, ideas, and movements for justice that emerged over this period—and the effects of the persistent, haunting shadow of our nation’s old and unreconciled history. Coates powerfully examines the events of the Obama era from his intimate and revealing perspective—the point of view of a young writer who begins the journey in an unemployment office in Harlem and ends it in the Oval Office, interviewing a president.

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11 .) Difficult Women by Roxane Gay

Lists It Appears On:

  • BBC Culture
  • BKLYN
  • Bustle
  • Do Lectures
  • Dont Mind The Mess
  • Heavy
  • The Coker Family
  • The Guardian 2
  • The Stranger
  • Washington Independent

Difficult Women tells of hardscrabble lives, passionate loves, and quirky and vexed human connection. The women in these stories live lives of privilege and of poverty, are in marriages both loving and haunted by past crimes or emotional blackmail. A pair of sisters have been inseparable ever since they were abducted together as children, and, grown now, must negotiate the elder sister’s marriage. A woman married to a twin pretends not to realize when her husband and his brother impersonate each other. A stripper putting herself through college fends off the advances of an overzealous customer. A black engineer moves to Upper Michigan for a job and faces the malign curiosity of her colleagues and the difficulty of leaving her past behind. From a girls’ fight club to a wealthy subdivision in Florida where neighbors conform, compete, and spy on each other, Gay gives voice to a chorus of unforgettable women in a scintillating collection reminiscent of Merritt Tierce, Anne Enright, and Miranda July.

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10 .) Priestdaddy by Patricia Lockwood

Lists It Appears On:

  • BKLYN
  • Book Page
  • Nick The Writer
  • Slate
  • The Cut
  • The Guardian 2
  • The New York Times
  • The Stranger
  • The Week
  • Vulture

“Father Greg Lockwood is unlike any Catholic priest you have ever met—a man who lounges in boxer shorts, loves action movies, and whose constant jamming on the guitar reverberates “like a whole band dying in a plane crash in 1972.” His daughter is an irreverent poet who long ago left the Church’s country. When an unexpected crisis leads her and her husband to move back into her parents’ rectory, their two worlds collide.

In Priestdaddy, Lockwood interweaves emblematic moments from her childhood and adolescence—from an ill-fated family hunting trip and an abortion clinic sit-in where her father was arrested to her involvement in a cultlike Catholic youth group—with scenes that chronicle the eight-month adventure she and her husband had in her parents’ household after a decade of living on their own. Lockwood details her education of a seminarian who is also living at the rectory, tries to explain Catholicism to her husband, who is mystified by its bloodthirstiness and arcane laws, and encounters a mysterious substance on a hotel bed with her mother. “

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9 .) Pachinko by Min Jin Lee

Lists It Appears On:

  • BBC Culture
  • BKLYN
  • Book Page
  • Chicago Public Library
  • Dont Mind The Mess
  • Media Diversified
  • New York Public Library
  • Novels + Nonfiction
  • The East Hampton Star
  • The New York Times
  • USA Today

“In the early 1900s, teenaged Sunja, the adored daughter of a crippled fisherman, falls for a wealthy stranger at the seashore near her home in Korea. He promises her the world, but when she discovers she is pregnant–and that her lover is married–she refuses to be bought. Instead, she accepts an offer of marriage from a gentle, sickly minister passing through on his way to Japan. But her decision to abandon her home, and to reject her son’s powerful father, sets off a dramatic saga that will echo down through the generations.

Richly told and profoundly moving, Pachinko is a story of love, sacrifice, ambition, and loyalty. From bustling street markets to the halls of Japan’s finest universities to the pachinko parlors of the criminal underworld, Lee’s complex and passionate characters–strong, stubborn women, devoted sisters and sons, fathers shaken by moral crisis–survive and thrive against the indifferent arc of history.”

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8 .) The Hate U Give by Angie Thomas

Lists It Appears On:

  • A Bookshelf Monstrosity
  • BKLYN
  • Culture Fly
  • Dont Mind The Mess
  • Girl Reporter
  • Indigo’s Books
  • Publishers Weekly 2
  • Sit Tableside
  • The Guardian 2
  • The Paperback Princess
  • The Root

“Sixteen-year-old Starr Carter moves between two worlds: the poor neighborhood where she lives and the fancy suburban prep school she attends. The uneasy balance between these worlds is shattered when Starr witnesses the fatal shooting of her childhood best friend Khalil at the hands of a police officer. Khalil was unarmed.

Soon afterward, his death is a national headline. Some are calling him a thug, maybe even a drug dealer and a gangbanger. Protesters are taking to the streets in Khalil’s name. Some cops and the local drug lord try to intimidate Starr and her family. What everyone wants to know is: what really went down that night? And the only person alive who can answer that is Starr.”

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7 .) Killers of the Flower Moon: The Osage Murders and the Birth of the FBI by David Grann

Lists It Appears On:

  • Chicago Public Library
  • Cosmopolitan
  • Library Journal
  • Library Reads
  • Maisonneuve
  • Newsday
  • NPR
  • Slate 2
  • Star Tribune
  • The East Hampton Star
  • The Seattle Times
  • The Week

“In this last remnant of the Wild West—where oilmen like J. P. Getty made their fortunes and where desperadoes like Al Spencer, the “Phantom Terror,” roamed—many of those who dared to investigate the killings were themselves murdered. As the death toll climbed to more than twenty-four, the FBI took up the case. It was one of the organization’s first major homicide investigations and the bureau badly bungled the case. In desperation, the young director, J. Edgar Hoover, turned to a former Texas Ranger named Tom White to unravel the mystery. White put together an undercover team, including one of the only American Indian agents in the bureau. The agents infiltrated the region, struggling to adopt the latest techniques of detection. Together with the Osage they began to expose one of the most chilling conspiracies in American history.
In Killers of the Flower Moon, David Grann revisits a shocking series of crimes in which dozens of people were murdered in cold blood. Based on years of research and startling new evidence, the book is a masterpiece of narrative nonfiction, as each step in the investigation reveals a series of sinister secrets and reversals. But more than that, it is a searing indictment of the callousness and prejudice toward American Indians that allowed the murderers to operate with impunity for so long. Killers of the Flower Moon is utterly compelling, but also emotionally devastating.”

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6 .) Hunger: A Memoir of (My) Body by Roxane Gay

Lists It Appears On:

  • Chicago Public Library
  • Cosmopolitan
  • Dont Mind The Mess
  • Indigo’s Books
  • Journal Sentinel
  • Library Journal
  • Newsday
  • People
  • Simon McDonald
  • The Berry
  • The Coil
  • The Coker Family
  • The Root

New York Times bestselling author Roxane Gay has written with intimacy and sensitivity about food and bodies, using her own emotional and psychological struggles as a means of exploring our shared anxieties over pleasure, consumption, appearance, and health. As a woman who describes her own body as “wildly undisciplined,” Roxane understands the tension between desire and denial, between self-comfort and self-care. In Hunger, she casts an insightful and critical eye on her childhood, teens, and twenties—including the devastating act of violence that acted as a turning point in her young life—and brings readers into the present and the realities, pains, and joys of her daily life.

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5 .) Little Fires Everywhere by Celeste Ng

Lists It Appears On:

  • Book Page
  • Bustle
  • Chicago Public Library
  • Cosmopolitan
  • Esquire
  • Girl Reporter
  • Houstonia
  • Kate’s Kairos
  • Library Reads
  • People
  • The Berry
  • The Coker Family
  • The Cornell Daily Sun
  • The Guardian 2
  • The Paperback Princess
  • Women

“In Shaker Heights, a placid, progressive suburb of Cleveland, everything is planned – from the layout of the winding roads, to the colors of the houses, to the successful lives its residents will go on to lead. And no one embodies this spirit more than Elena Richardson, whose guiding principle is playing by the rules.

Enter Mia Warren – an enigmatic artist and single mother – who arrives in this idyllic bubble with her teenaged daughter Pearl, and rents a house from the Richardsons. Soon Mia and Pearl become more than tenants: all four Richardson children are drawn to the mother-daughter pair. But Mia carries with her a mysterious past and a disregard for the status quo that threatens to upend this carefully ordered community.

When old family friends of the Richardsons attempt to adopt a Chinese-American baby, a custody battle erupts that dramatically divides the town–and puts Mia and Elena on opposing sides. Suspicious of Mia and her motives, Elena is determined to uncover the secrets in Mia’s past. But her obsession will come at unexpected and devastating costs. “

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4 .) Manhattan Beach by Jennifer Egan

Lists It Appears On:

  • BBC Culture
  • Book Page
  • Brooklyn Based
  • Chicago Public Library
  • Esquire
  • Macleans
  • Newsday
  • NPR
  • Simon McDonald
  • Slate
  • Slate 2
  • Star Tribune
  • The Cornell Daily Sun
  • The Cut
  • The East Hampton Star
  • The Guardian 2
  • USA Today
  • Washington Independent

“Anna Kerrigan, nearly twelve years old, accompanies her father to visit Dexter Styles, a man who, she gleans, is crucial to the survival of her father and her family. She is mesmerized by the sea beyond the house and by some charged mystery between the two men.

Years later, her father has disappeared and the country is at war. Anna works at the Brooklyn Naval Yard, where women are allowed to hold jobs that once belonged to men, now soldiers abroad. She becomes the first female diver, the most dangerous and exclusive of occupations, repairing the ships that will help America win the war. One evening at a nightclub, she meets Dexter Styles again, and begins to understand the complexity of her father’s life, the reasons he might have vanished.”

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3 .) Exit West by Mohsin Hamid

Lists It Appears On:

  • AV Club
  • BKLYN
  • Book Page
  • Chicago Public Library
  • Dont Mind The Mess
  • Heavy
  • Kate’s Kairos
  • New York Public Library
  • Nick The Writer
  • Now Toronto
  • People
  • Publishers Weekly 2
  • Star Tribune
  • Star Tribune
  • The Cornell Daily Sun
  • The Guardian 2
  • The Los Angeles Review
  • The New York Times
  • The Week
  • Washington Independent

In a country teetering on the brink of civil war, two young people meet—sensual, fiercely independent Nadia and gentle, restrained Saeed. They embark on a furtive love affair, and are soon cloistered in a premature intimacy by the unrest roiling their city. When it explodes, turning familiar streets into a patchwork of checkpoints and bomb blasts, they begin to hear whispers about doors—doors that can whisk people far away, if perilously and for a price. As the violence escalates, Nadia and Saeed decide that they no longer have a choice. Leaving their homeland and their old lives behind, they find a door and step through. . . .

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2 .) Sing, Unburied, Sing by Jesmyn Ward

Lists It Appears On:

  • BBC Culture
  • BKLYN
  • Book Page
  • Bustle
  • Chicago Public Library
  • Cosmopolitan
  • Dont Mind The Mess
  • Heauxs
  • Kate’s Kairos
  • Net Galley
  • Newsday
  • NPR
  • People
  • Publishers Weekly
  • Sit Tableside
  • Star Tribune
  • The Coil
  • The Coker Family
  • The New York Times
  • The Root
  • The Washington Post
  • Washington Independent

“In Jesmyn Ward’s first novel since her National Book Award–winning Salvage the Bones, this singular American writer brings the archetypal road novel into rural twenty-first-century America. An intimate portrait of a family and an epic tale of hope and struggle, Sing, Unburied, Sing journeys through Mississippi’s past and present, examining the ugly truths at the heart of the American story and the power—and limitations—of family bonds.

Jojo is thirteen years old and trying to understand what it means to be a man. He doesn’t lack in fathers to study, chief among them his Black grandfather, Pop. But there are other men who complicate his understanding: his absent White father, Michael, who is being released from prison; his absent White grandfather, Big Joseph, who won’t acknowledge his existence; and the memories of his dead uncle, Given, who died as a teenager.

His mother, Leonie, is an inconsistent presence in his and his toddler sister’s lives. She is an imperfect mother in constant conflict with herself and those around her. She is Black and her children’s father is White. She wants to be a better mother but can’t put her children above her own needs, especially her drug use. Simultaneously tormented and comforted by visions of her dead brother, which only come to her when she’s high, Leonie is embattled in ways that reflect the brutal reality of her circumstances.”

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1 .) Lincoln in the Bardo by George Saunders

Lists It Appears On:

  • AV Club
  • BBC Culture
  • Book Page
  • Chicago Public Library
  • Girl Reporter
  • Heavy
  • Journal Sentinel
  • Library Journal
  • Lit Hub
  • Macleans
  • New York Public Library
  • Newsday
  • NPR
  • People
  • Publishers Weekly 2
  • Slate
  • The Coil
  • The Cornell Daily Sun
  • The East Hampton Star
  • The Guardian
  • The Guardian 2
  • The Washington Post
  • The Week
  • USA Today
  • Waterstones

“February 1862. The Civil War is less than one year old. The fighting has begun in earnest, and the nation has begun to realize it is in for a long, bloody struggle. Meanwhile, President Lincoln’s beloved eleven-year-old son, Willie, lies upstairs in the White House, gravely ill. In a matter of days, despite predictions of a recovery, Willie dies and is laid to rest in a Georgetown cemetery. “My poor boy, he was too good for this earth,” the president says at the time. “God has called him home.” Newspapers report that a grief-stricken Lincoln returns, alone, to the crypt several times to hold his boy’s body.

From that seed of historical truth, George Saunders spins an unforgettable story of familial love and loss that breaks free of its realistic, historical framework into a supernatural realm both hilarious and terrifying. Willie Lincoln finds himself in a strange purgatory where ghosts mingle, gripe, commiserate, quarrel, and enact bizarre acts of penance. Within this transitional state—called, in the Tibetan tradition, the bardo—a monumental struggle erupts over young Willie’s soul.”

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The 775+ Additional Best Books Of 2017



 

#BooksAuthorsLists
(Titles Appear On 4 Lists Each)
37Conversations With FriendsSally RooneySlate
The Cut
The Guardian 2
BKLYN
38Eleanor Oliphant is Completely FineGail HoneymanLibrary Reads
Net Galley
Novels + Nonfiction
The Berry
39Golden Hill: A Novel of Old New YorkFrancis SpuffordSlate 2
NPR
Star Tribune
The Seattle Times
40GrantRon ChernowBook Page
Newsday
The Coil
The New York Times
41Midwinter BreakBernard MacLavertyStar Tribune
The Guardian
The Guardian 2
The Journal
42Option B: Facing Adversity, Building Resilience, and Finding JoySheryl Sandberg and Adam GrantDo Lectures
Indigo’s Books
Peak Performance
Women
43South and West: From a NotebookJoan DidionThe Cornell Daily Sun
Houstonia
The Berry
Women
44The Dinner Party and Other StoriesJoshua FerrisEsquire
The Guardian 2
The Week
Women
45The Future is History: How Totalitarianism Reclaimed RussiaMasha GessenNewsday
Publishers Weekly 2
The Seattle Times
The Washington Post
46The Lost WordsRobert Macfarlane, Jackie MorrisDo Lectures
The Guardian
The Guardian 2
Waterstones
47The PowerNaomi AldermanBustle
The Berry
The New York Times
The Washington Post
48The RefugeesViet Thanh NguyenBook Page
Dont Mind The Mess
Media Diversified
Star Tribune
49The Unwomanly Face of WarSvetlana AlexievichAV Club
The Guardian
The Guardian 2
The Week
50There Are More Beautiful Things Than BeyoncéMorgan ParkerPublishers Weekly 2
The Guardian
The Root
The Stranger
(Titles Appear On 3 Lists Each)
51BorneJeff VanderMeerCosmopolitan
Do Lectures
Dont Mind The Mess
52CaravalStephanie GarberCulture Fly
Net Galley
Do Lectures
53Days Without EndSebastian BarryStar Tribune
The Guardian
The Guardian 2
54Forest DarkNicole KraussEsquire
The Cut
The Guardian 2
55I Am Not Your Perfect Mexican DaughterErika L. SanchezBustle
Media Diversified
NPR
56I Am, I Am, I AmMaggie O’FarrellGirl Reporter
Simon McDonald
The Guardian 2
57ImprovementJoan SilberBBC Culture
Newsday
The Seattle Times
58Magpie MurdersAnthony HorowitzEsquire
Library Reads
Star Tribune
59MarlenaJulie BuntinDont Mind The Mess
The Cut
BKLYN
60Men Without WomenHaruki MurakamiEsquire
The Cornell Daily Sun
The Week
61My Absolute DarlingGabriel TallentKate’s Kairos
The Cornell Daily Sun
USA Today
62Prairie Fires: The American Dreams of Laura Ingalls WilderCaroline FraserStar Tribune
The New York Times
The Seattle Times
63Stay With MeAyobami AdebayoMedia Diversified
New York Public Library
The Guardian 2
64The AnimatorsKayla Rae WhitakerBook Page
Simon McDonald
BKLYN
65The AnswersCatherine LaceyAV Club
Esquire
Maisonneuve
66The Bright HourNina RiggsBook Page
Peak Performance
Houstonia
67The Color of Law: A Forgotten History of How Our Government Segregated AmericaRichard RothsteinBKLYN
Publishers Weekly
The Dirt
68The DryJane HarperHeauxs
Library Reads
The Guardian
69The Ninth HourAlice McDermottLibrary Journal
NPR
Washington Independent
70The Seven Husbands of Evelyn HugoTaylor Jenkins ReidDont Mind The Mess
BKLYN
Sarah’s Book Shelves
71They Can’t Kill Us Until They Kill UsHanif AbdurraqibHeavy
The Coil
The Los Angeles Review
72This Is Going to HurtAdam KayCulture Fly
Net Galley
The Guardian
73Turtles All The Way DownJohn GreenAV Club
BKLYN
Kate’s Kairos
74Why I’m No Longer Talking to White People About RaceReni Eddo-LodgeGirl Reporter
The Guardian
The Guardian 2
(Titles Appear On 2 Lists Each)
75300 ArgumentsSarah MangusoAV Club
Journal Sentinel
76A Kind of FreedomMargaret Wilkerson SextonBBC Culture
Dont Mind The Mess
77A Legacy of SpiesJohn le CarréMacleans
The Guardian
78A SeparationKatie KitamuraAV Club
Washington Independent
79Abandon MeMelissa FebosBustle
The Cut
80Age of Anger: A History of the PresentPankaj MishraSlate 2
The Week
81All Grown UpJami AttenbergThe Stranger
Journal Sentinel
82Among the Living and the DeadInara VerzemnieksBook Page
Star Tribune
83An OdysseyDaniel MendelsohnDo Lectures
Newsday
84Ants Among Elephants: An Untouchable Family and the Making of Modern IndiaSujatha GidlaBloomberg Quint
Publishers Weekly
85Between ThemRichard FordBook Page
NPR
86Cannibalism: A Perfectly Natural HistoryBill SchuttNovels + Nonfiction
Washington Independent
87Clayton Byrd goes undergroundRita Williams-GarciaBKLYN
Star Tribune
88Conscious Coaching: The Art and Science of Building Buy-InBrett BartholomewDo Lectures
Peak Performance
89Dare Not LingerNelson Mandela, Mandla Langa, Graca MachelDo Lectures
The Guardian
90David BowieDylan JonesDo Lectures
The Guardian
91Dear MartinNic StoneBKLYN
Star Tribune
92Extreme Cities: The Perils and Promise of Urban Life in the Age of Climate ChangeAshley DawsonPublishers Weekly
The Dirt
93Five Carat SoulJames McBridePublishers Weekly 2
Star Tribune
94Future Home of the Living GodLouise ErdrichBBC Culture
Publishers Weekly 2
95Ghachar GhocharVivek Shanbhag, translated by Srinath PerurThe Globe
The Guardian 2
96Glass HousesLouise PennyLibrary Reads
The Globe
97Go, Went, GoneJenny ErpenbeckStar Tribune
The Guardian 2
98HomegoingYaa GyasiGirl Reporter
The Week
99Homesick For Another WorldOttessa MoshfeghAV Club
BKLYN
100Homo DeusYuval Noah HarariDo Lectures
Peak Performance
101House of NamesColm ToibinThe Guardian 2
The Week
102How Not To Be A BoyRobert WebbDo Lectures
The Guardian
103I Was Told to Come Alone: My Journey Behind the Lines of JihadSouad MekhennetBustle
The Washington Post
104Ill WillDan ChaonDont Mind The Mess
Publishers Weekly
105Into the WaterPaula HawkinsKate’s Kairos
The Week
106IrresistibleAdam AlterDo Lectures
Peak Performance
107Kingdom of GravityThe Guardian
The Guardian 2
108Layli Long SoldierWhereasLit Hub
Lit Hub
109LessAndrew Sean GreerMaisonneuve
The Washington Post
110Long Way DownJason ReynoldsDont Mind The Mess
Star Tribune
111Moving KingsJoshua CohenEsquire
Vulture
112Mrs. FletcherTom PerrottaEsquire
Women
113My Favorite Thing Is MonstersEmil FerrisChicago Public Library
New York Public Library
114New PeopleDanzy SennaEsquire
The Root
115NomadlandJessica BruderLibrary Journal
The Stranger
116Norse MythologyNeil GaimanHeavy
Indigo’s Books
117Notes on a Foreign CountrySuzy HansenBook Page
Vulture
118Perennial SellerRyan HolidayDo Lectures
Peak Performance
119Ranger Games: A Story of Soldiers, Family and an Inexplicable CrimeBen BlumIndigo’s Books
The Stranger
120Rising Star: The Making of Barack ObamaDAVID J. GARROWBloomberg Quint
The Washington Post
121Salt HousesHala AlyanBook Page
Media Diversified
122SmileRoddy DoyleThe Guardian 2
The Week
123Son of a TricksterEden RobinsonMaisonneuve
Now Toronto
124Spaceman of BohemiaJaroslav KalfarCulture Fly
Heavy
125Sticky Fingers: The Life and Times of Jann Wenner and Rolling Stone MagazineJoe HaganUSA Today
Vulture
126Swimmer Among the StarsKanishk TharoorGirl Reporter
The Guardian
127Talking To My Daughter About The EconomyYanis VaroufakisDo Lectures
Waterstones
128The BreakMarian KeyesMaisonneuve
The Journal
129The ChangelingVictor LaValleNew York Public Library
USA Today
130The Child FinderRene DenfeldIndigo’s Books
The Globe
131The Fact of a Body: A Murder and a MemoirAlexandria Marzano-LesnevichDont Mind The Mess
The Guardian 2
132The Floating WorldC. Morgan BabstBustle
Heauxs
133The Golden HouseSalman RushdieEsquire
Now Toronto
134The Heart’s Invisible FuriesJohn BoyneHoustonia
Sarah’s Book Shelves
135
The Infidel and the Professor: David Hume, Adam Smith and the Friendship That Shaped Modern Thought
Bloomberg Quint
The Guardian 2
136The Invention of Angela CarterEdmund GordonSlate
Vulture
137The Long DropDenise MinaNet Galley
The Guardian
138The Mother Of All QuestionsRebecca SolnitAV Club
The Stranger
139The Radium Girls: The Dark Story of America’s Shining WomenKate MooreLibrary Reads
The Paperback Princess
140The Republic for Which It Stands: The United States During Reconstruction and the Gilded Age, 1865-1896Richard WhiteBloomberg Quint
The Seattle Times
141The Sparsholt AffairThe Guardian
The Guardian 2
142The State of Affairs: Rethinking InfidelityEsther PerelEsquire
Women
143Theft By FindingDavid SedarisAV Club
Book Page
144Things That Happened Before the EarthquakeChiara BarziniEsquire
The Guardian 2
145Tin ManSarah WinmanCulture Fly
The Guardian 2
146Too Much and Not the MoodDurga Chew-BoseBrooklyn Based
The Guardian
147When Dimple met RishiSandhya MenonBKLYN
Girl Reporter
148WinterAli SmithThe Guardian 2
The Week
149World Without MindFranklin FoerDo Lectures
The Stranger
(Titles Appear On 1 Lists Each)
150(v.)Anastacia-Renée
The Stranger
151100 Nasty Women of History: Brilliant, badass and completely fearless women everyone should knowHannah JewellCulture Fly
15221st-Century YokelTom CoxAV Club
1535 IngredientsJamie OliverDo Lectures
154A Bag Worth a PonyMarcia G. Anderson
Star Tribune
155A Casualty of PowerMukuka Chipanta
Media Diversified
156A Chill in the Air
The Guardian 2
157A Conjuring of LightV.E. Schwab
The Paperback Princess
158A Doll for ThrowingMary Jo Bang
Star Tribune
159A Gentleman in MoscowAmor Towles
The Coker Family
160A History Of The World In Seven Cheap ThingsJason W. Moore and Raj PatelDo Lectures
161A Horse Walks into a Bar: A NovelDavid Grossman
Washington Independent
162A Life in LettersPatrick Leigh Fermor
Star Tribune
163A Life of My Own
The Guardian 2
164A Line in the DarkMalinda Lo
Star Tribune
165A Man of ShadowsJeff NoonNet Galley
166A Million JunesEmily Henry
Hidden Staircase
167A Moonless, Starless Sky: Ordinary Women and Men Fighting Extremism in AfricaAlexis OkeowoThe Cut
168
A New Literary History of Modern China
Bloomberg Quint
169A New Map of Wonders
The Guardian 2
170A Perilous UndertakingDeanna RaybournCulture Fly
171A PLACE CALLED NO HOMELANDKAI CHENG THOMBook Riot
172A Place for All People
The Guardian 2
173A Sailor Went to Sea, Sea, SeaFavourite Rhymes from an Irish ChildhoodThe Journal
174A Selfie as Big as the Ritz: StoriesLara WilliamsThe Cut
175A Single Throat OpensThe Coil
176A Skinful of ShadowsFrances Hardinge
Waterstones
177A SOCIEDADE DOS SONHADORES INVOLUNTÁRIOSJOSÉ EDUARDO AGUALUSABook Riot
178A State of Freedom
The Guardian 2
179A World Of Three ZerosMuhammad YunusDo Lectures
180A year in the WildernessAmy and Dave Freeman
Star Tribune
181Above the WaterfallRon Rash
The Bottle Imp
182Adults In The Room: My Battle With Europe’s Deep Establishment,Yanis VaroufakisThe Week
183After Kathy Acker
The Guardian
184After the EclipseSarah PerryBook Page
185After the ParadeLori Ostend
A Bookshelf Monstrosity
186Afterglow: A Dog MemoirEileen Myles
The Stranger
187
Against the Grain: A Deep History of the Earliest States
Bloomberg Quint
188Akata WarriorNnedi OkoraforThe Root
189Al Franken, Giant of the SenateAl Franken
Hidden Staircase
190AlfieThyra Heder
Star Tribune
191Ali SmithAutumnLit Hub
192Ali: A LifeJonathan Eig
Star Tribune
193All My DogsBill Henderson, drawings by Leslie Moore
Star Tribune
194All the Beloved Ghosts
The Guardian 2
195All the Wind in the WorldSamantha Mabry
Star Tribune
196All Things Remembered
The Guardian
197Always Another Country
The Guardian 2
198AmatkaKarin Tidbeck
Dont Mind The Mess
199Amelia GrayIsadoraLit Hub
200American Sanctuary: Mutiny, Martyrdom, and National Identity in the Age of RevolutionA. Roger Ekirch
Washington Independent
201American StreetIbi Aanu ZoboiBKLYN
202An extraordinary unionAlyssa ColeBKLYN
203An Uncommon Reader: A Life of Edward Garnett, Mentor and Editor of Literary GeniusHelen Smith
Journal Sentinel
204And Every Morning the Way Home Gets Longer and LongerFredrik Backman
The Coker Family
205And Fire Came DownEmma Viskic
Simon McDonald
206Angel Hill
The Guardian
207ApolloZack ScottDo Lectures
208Apollo in the Age of Aquarius
Bloomberg Quint
209Appointment in Arezzo
The Guardian 2
210ARTEMISANDY WEIR
Kate’s Kairos
211As Kingfishers Catch Fire
The Guardian 2
212Astrophysics for People in a HurryNeil deGrasse Tyson
Washington Independent
213Atlas of the Irish RevolutionJohn Crowley, Donál Ó Drisceoil, Mike Murphy and John BorgonovoThe Journal
214Attica LockeBluebird, BluebirdLit Hub
215AugustownKei MillerSlate 2
216Back to BonesChristine Dwyer HickeyThe Journal
217Bad Feminist
Journal Sentinel
218BantamJackie Kay
The Bottle Imp
219Barking Up The Wrong TreeEric BarkerDo Lectures
220Baseball Life AdviceStacey May Fowles
Maisonneuve
221Be a Man
The Guardian 2
222Be Like the Fox
The Guardian 2
223Be SeatedThe Dirt
224Beast: A NovelPaul Kingsnorth
Washington Independent
225Beautiful Animals
The Guardian 2
226
Becoming Myself: A Psychiatrist’s Memoir
The Guardian
227Becoming WiseKrista Tippett
Peak Performance
228BehaveROBERT M. SAPOLSKY
The Washington Post
229Behind Her EyesSarah Pinborough
Girl Reporter
230Behind Her EyesSarah PinboroughLit Hub
231Bellevue SquareMichael Redhill
Now Toronto
232Bellevue: Three Centuries of Medicine and Mayhem at America’s Most Storied HospitalDavid Oshinsky
Brooklyn Based
233Beyond InfinityEugenia ChengDo Lectures
234Bill KnottI Am Flying Into MyselfLit Hub
235Birds Art LifeKyo Maclear
Now Toronto
236Bitcoin The Future Of Money?Dominic FrisbyDo Lectures
237Black Country
The Guardian 2
238Blue Ocean ShiftChan Kim Renee MauborgneDo Lectures
239Bluets
The Guardian
240BOOKSHOPS: A CULTURAL HISTORYJorge CarriónMacleans
241Border CountryMartha Greene Phillips
Star Tribune
242Border: A Journey to the Edge of EuropeKapka Kassabova
The Bottle Imp
243Born both : an intersex lifeHida. ViloriaBKLYN
244Braving The WildernessBrene BrownDo Lectures
245BrotherDavid Chariandy
Now Toronto
246Bystanders
The Guardian
247Called to Account
The Guardian 2
248Calling a Wolf a WolfThe Coil
249Calling my nameLiara TamaniBKLYN
250Captain Class: The Hidden Force Creating the World’s Greatest TeamsSam Walker
Peak Performance
251Carmen Maria MachadoHer Body and Other PartiesLit Hub
252Charif ShanahanInto Each Room We Enter Without KnowingLit Hub
253ChemistryWeike Wang
Dont Mind The Mess
254Chief Seattle and the Town that Took His NameDavid Buerge
The Seattle Times
255
Christian Dior: Designer of Dreams
Publishers Weekly 2
256Churchill and OrwellThomas Ricks
The Seattle Times
257City of BonesKwame DawesThe Root
258City of Saints & ThievesNatalie C. AndersonNet Galley
259City of SaviorsRachel Howzell HallThe Root
260CLIMATE CHANGE AND THE HEALTH OF NATIONSAnthony McMichaelMacleans
261ColourMarion DeucharsDo Lectures
262Conflict Is Not AbuseSarah Schulman
The Stranger
263Cook Well, Eat WellRory O’ ConnellThe Journal
264CottonmouthsKelly J. Ford
The Los Angeles Review
265Cove
The Guardian 2
266Crimson LakeCandice Fox
Simon McDonald
267Crossing the Unknown SeaDavid Whyte
Peak Performance
268Crown : an ode to the fresh cutDerrick D. BarnesBKLYN
269Daemon Voices
The Guardian
270Danez SmithDon’t Call Us DeadLit Hub
271Danzy SennaNew PeopleLit Hub
272Dark Matter
Novels + Nonfiction
273Dead LettersCaite Dolan-Leach
Sarah’s Book Shelves
274Dead Reckoning: How I Came to Meet the Man Who Murdered My FatherCarys CraggThe Globe
275Dear Ijeawele, or a Feminist Manifesto in Fifteen SuggestionsChimamanda Ngozi AdichieThe Root
276Denise MinaThe Long DropLit Hub
277Design Is StorytellingEllen LuptonDo Lectures
278Dethroning Mammon
The Guardian 2
279Did It! From Yippie to Yuppie: Jerry Rubin, an American RevolutionaryPat Thomas
The Stranger
280Dinner with Darwin: Food, Drink, and EvolutionJonathan Silvertown
Washington Independent
281Dirt RoadJames Kelman
The Bottle Imp
282Discipline Equals FreedomJocko WillinkDo Lectures
283Dislocating the Orient
The Guardian 2
284Disrupting ThinkingKylene BeersDo Lectures
285Division Street
The Guardian 2
286Do OpenDavid HieattDo Lectures
287Do Wild BakingTom HerbertDo Lectures
288Don’t Call Us DeadDanez SmithThe Root
289Dorothy B. HughesIn a Lonely PlaceLit Hub
290Double UpGretchen Archer
Hidden Staircase
291DowntimeNadine Levy RedzepiDo Lectures
292Dr. Bethune’s ChildrenXue Yiwei, translated by Darryl SterkThe Globe
293Draw Your WeaponsSarah SentillesLit Hub
294
Drawdown: The Most Comprehensive Plan Ever Proposed to Reverse Global Warming
The Dirt
295
Dreaming the Beatles: The Love Story of One Band and the Whole World
Bloomberg Quint
296East West Street
The Guardian
297Eastman Was HereAlex GilvarryEsquire
298Economics for the Common GoodJean TiroleDo Lectures
299Ego Is the EnemyRyan Holiday
12 Five Capital
300Electric ArchesEve L. Ewing
Chicago Public Library
301Elena PassarelloAnimals Strike Curious PosesLit Hub
302Elif BatumanThe IdiotLit Hub
303EligibleCurtis Sittenfeld
A Bookshelf Monstrosity
304Elizabeth McGuireRed at HeartLit Hub
305Elmet
The Guardian 2
306Emma in the NightWendy Walker
Sarah’s Book Shelves
307EnduranceScott KellyBook Page
308EndureAlex Hutchinson
Peak Performance
309Enemies and Neighbours
The Guardian 2
310Erotic stories for Punjabi widowsBalli Kaur JaswalBKLYN
311Eugene LimDear CyborgsLit Hub
312Everything Belongs to UsYoojin Grace Wuertz
Dont Mind The Mess
313Falling Awake
The Guardian 2
314Fantasyland: How America Went Haywire, a 500-Year HistoryKurt Andersen
The Stranger
315Far From the TreeRobin Benway
The Paperback Princess
316Fast Track TriathleteMatt Dixon
Peak Performance
317
Fasting and Feasting by Adam Federman
The Guardian
318Fear City: New York’s Fiscal Crisis and the Rise of Austerity PoliticsKim Phillips-Fein
Publishers Weekly
319Felt in the JawKristen N. ArnettThe Coil
320Fever DreamSamanta SchweblinThe Cut
321Fever Dream (trans. Megan McDowell)Samanta SchweblinLit Hub
322
Fifty Inventions That Changed the Modern Economy
Bloomberg Quint
323Finding My VirginityRichard BransonDo Lectures
324First Love
The Guardian 2
325First Time Ever
The Guardian 2
326Flâneuse: Women Walk The City In ParisLauren ElkinAV Club
327Flashlight NightMatt Forrest Esenwine, illustrated by Fred Koehler
Star Tribune
328Flight of the MaidensJane Gardam
Star Tribune
329France Is A feast
Publishers Weekly 2
330Fresh Complaint
The Guardian 2
331Fresh IndiaMeera SodhaDo Lectures
332Freshwater
The Guardian 2
333From Bacteria To Bach And BackDaniel DennettDo Lectures
334Game ChangerFergus Connolly and Phil White
Peak Performance
335Generation CherryTim DrakeDo Lectures
336Genesis Trilogy
Sit Tableside
337GhostJason Reynolds
A Bookshelf Monstrosity
338Ghost Of The Innocent ManBenjamin Rachlin
Library Journal
339Ghosts of the TsunamiRichard Lloyd ParryLit Hub
340Ginny MoonBenjamin Ludwig
Library Journal
341Global DiscontentsNoam ChomskyDo Lectures
342
Global Inequality: A New Approach for the Age of Globalization
The Guardian
343Going Into Town: A Love Letter to New YorkRoz Chast
Journal Sentinel
344Good Night Stories for Rebel GirlsElena Favilli, Francesca Cavallo
Waterstones
345
Goodnight Stories for Rebel Girls
The Guardian 2
346Goodnight WorldDebi Gliori
Star Tribune
347
Gorbachev: His Life and Times
Bloomberg Quint
348Gorilla and the Bird: A Memoir of Madness and a Mother’s LoveZack McDermott
Brooklyn Based
349GracePaul LynchEsquire
350Graphic: 500 Designs That MatterPhaidon EditorsDo Lectures
351Great ThinkersThe School of Life
Peak Performance
352
Greater Gotham: A History of New York City From 1898 to 1919
Bloomberg Quint
353Grief CottageGail Godwin
Publishers Weekly
354Hamilton: The RevolutionLin-Manuel Miranda and Jeremy McCarter
Hidden Staircase
355
Handbook of Biophilic City Planning & Design
The Dirt
356he: A novelJohn ConnollyThe Journal
357Head StrongDave AspreyDo Lectures
358HeartlessMarissa Meyer
A Bookshelf Monstrosity
359Heather, The TotalityMatthew WeinerEsquire
360Here in BerlinCristina Garcia
BBC Culture
361Here We AreOliver JeffersDo Lectures
362Hillbilly ElegyJ. D. Vance.
12 Five Capital
363History of a Disappearance: The Story of a Forgotten Polish TownFilip Springer; translated by Sean Bye
Star Tribune
364History of WolvesEmily Fridlund
Star Tribune
365Hit MakersDerek ThompsonDo Lectures
366Hit So HardPatty Schemel
Cosmopolitan
367Hold Back the StarsKatie KhanCulture Fly
368Hortense and the shadowNatalia O’HaraBKLYN
369HothouseKaryna McGlynn
Maisonneuve
370How Emotions Are Made: The Secret Life of the BrainLisa Feldman Barrett
Peak Performance
371How Running Makes Us HumanVybarr Cregan-ReidDo Lectures
372How the Hell Did This Happen: The US Election of 2016PJ O’RourkeThe Week
373How To Be A CraftivistSarah CorbettDo Lectures
374How To Be HumanNew ScientistDo Lectures
375How to Behave in a Crowd
The Guardian
376How To Build A CarAdrian NeweyDo Lectures
377How to Live: Or a Life of Montaigne in One Question and Twenty Attempts at An AnswerSarah Bakewell
Peak Performance
378How to Murder Your LifeCat MarnellWomen
379How to Stop TimeMatt HaigNet Galley
380
Hum If You Don’t Know The Words
Novels + Nonfiction
381Human ActsHan Kang
Dont Mind The Mess
382I believe in a thing called loveMaurene GooBKLYN
383I Can’t BreatheMATT TAIBBI
The Washington Post
384I Found my TribeRuth FitzmauriceThe Journal
385I’d Die For You: And Other Lost StoriesF. Scott FitzgeraldThe Week
386IdahoEmily RuskovichAV Club
387If I StayGayle Forman
A Bookshelf Monstrosity
388If I Were in a Cage I’d Reach Out for YouAdèle Barclay
Maisonneuve
389If We Were VillainsM.L. Rio
Sarah’s Book Shelves
390
iGen: Why Today’s Super-Connected Kids Are Growing Up Less Rebellious, More Tolerant, Less Happy — and Completely Unprepared for Adulthood
Bloomberg Quint
391IkigaiHéctor GarcíaDo Lectures
392Imaginary Cities: A Tour Of Dream CitiesDarran AndersonAV Club
393Improbable Destinies: Fate, Chance, and the Future of EvolutionJonathan B. Losos
Washington Independent
394In A Different KeyJohn Donvan and Caren ZuckerDo Lectures
395In Cold Blood
The East Hampton Star
396In Pursuit Of MemoryJoseph JebelliDo Lectures
397In the DistanceHernán Díaz
Publishers Weekly
398In the Long Run We Are All DeadGeoff Mann
The Stranger
399Independent People
The Guardian 2
400India Conquered
The Guardian 2
401
Insomniac Diaries: Experiments with Time
The Guardian
402Istanbul: A Tale of Three CitiesBettany Hughes
Washington Independent
403
It’s Just Nerves: Notes on a Disability
The Coil
404Jane, unlimitedKristin CashoreBKLYN
405Janesville: An American StoryAmy Goldstein
Journal Sentinel
406Jeff GuinnThe Road to JonestownLit Hub
407Jesmyn WardSing, Unburied, SingLit Hub
408Joe IdeRighteousLit Hub
409Joining the Dots
The Guardian 2
410Judas: A NovelAmos Oz
Washington Independent
411Kamila ShamsieHome FireLit Hub
412Karl GearyMontpelier ParadeLit Hub
413Katie KitamuraA SeparationLit Hub
414Kill All Normies
The Guardian
415KindnessJaime ThurstonDo Lectures
416Kingmaker: Kingdom ComeToby ClementsCulture Fly
417Kings of Broken ThingsThe Coil
418KintuJennifer Nansubuga MakumbiThe Globe
419Koya BoundDan Rubin and Craig ModDo Lectures
420Kristen RadtkeImagine Wanting Only ThisLit Hub
421Kumukanda
The Guardian 2
422Landscape with invisible handM. T. AndersonBKLYN
423Leonardo PaduraHeretics (trans. Anna Kushner)Lit Hub
424Lie to MeJ.T. Ellison.
Hidden Staircase
425Life 3.0Max TegmarkDo Lectures
426Life After Life
The Guardian 2
427Life in Code: A Personal History of TechnologyEllen UllmanSlate 2
428
Life’s Work: A Moral Argument for Choiceby Dr
Cosmopolitan
429LightwoodThe Coil
430Lillian Boxfish Takes a WalkThe Coil
431Lincoln’s Pathfinder: John C. Frémont and the Violent Election of 1856John Bicknell
Washington Independent
432Little & LionBrandy Colbert
Dont Mind The Mess
433Little Labours
The Guardian 2
434Little Me
The Guardian
435Locking Up Our Own: Crime and Punishment in Black AmericaJames Forman Jr.
The New York Times
436LookSolmaz Sharif
Maisonneuve
437Lost City of the Monkey God
The East Hampton Star
438Love & Fame
The Guardian 2
439Love and Trouble: A Midlife ReckoningClaire Dederer
The Stranger
440Lucky BoyShanthi Sekaran
Library Journal
441
Lygia Pape: A Multitude of Forms
The Guardian 2
442Ma’am Darling
The Guardian
443MacCloud FallsRobert Alan Jamieson
The Bottle Imp
444Madame President: The Extraordinary Journey of Ellen Johnson SirleafHelene Cooper
Washington Independent
445Madame Zero
The Guardian 2
446Made for Lovealissa nuttingHeauxs
447Make TroubleJohn Waters
Journal Sentinel
448Map to the StarsAdrian MatejkaHoustonia
449
Margaret Cannon’s Favourite Crime Fiction of 2017
The Globe
450Marriage of a thousand liesSJ SinduBKLYN
451Mary GaitskillSomebody With a Little HammerLit Hub
452Meet Me in the Bathroom
The East Hampton Star
453MentalJaime Lowe
Brooklyn Based
454Ministry of Utmost HappinessArundhati Roy
Star Tribune
455Missing Fay
The Guardian 2
456Mohsin HamidExit WestLit Hub
457Monica HesseAmerican FireLit Hub
458Montaigne in Barn Boots: An Amateur Ambles Through PhilosophyMichael Perry
Journal Sentinel
459Morgan ParkerThere Are More Beautiful Things Than BeyoncéLit Hub
460Morning, Noon, NightSoho HouseDo Lectures
461MotherfoclóirDarach Ó SéaghdhaThe Journal
462
Movement and Meaning: The Landscapes of Hoerr Schaudt
The Dirt
463Moxie : a novelJennifer MathieuBKLYN
464Mr Iyer Goes to War: A NovelRyan Lobo
Washington Independent
465Mr LearJenny Uglow
Waterstones
466Mr. Fix ItRichard Ali A Mutu
Media Diversified
467Mrs Osmond
The Guardian 2
468Mural
The Guardian
469
Muriel Spark Centenary Editions
The Bottle Imp
470My House of Sky
The Guardian 2
471My Life with Bob: Flawed Heroine Keeps Book of Books, Plot EnsuesPamela PaulHoustonia
472N.K. JemisinThe Stone SkyLit Hub
473Nasty Women: A Collection of Essays + Accounts on What it is to be a Woman in the 21st Century editedHeather McDaid and Laura Jones
The Bottle Imp
474Nate BlakesleeAmerican WolfLit Hub
475Nature poemTommy PicoBKLYN
476Never Caught: The Washingtons’ Relentless Pursuit of Their Runaway Slave, Ona Judge,Erica Armstrong DunbarThe Coil
477Nevermoor: The Trials of Morrigan CrowJessica Townsend
Simon McDonald
478New BoyTracy Chevalier
Simon McDonald
479News of the World: A NovelPaulette Jiles
Library Reads
480Night and DayJulie Safirstein
Star Tribune
481Night Sky with Exit Wounds
The Guardian 2
482No Is Not Enough: Resisting Trump’s Shock Politics and Winning the World We NeedNaomi KleinBustle
483No One Can Pronounce My NameRakesh Satyal
Dont Mind The Mess
484No One Cares About Crazy People: The Chaos and Heartbreak of Mental Health in AmericaRon PowersPeople
485No One Is Coming to Save UsStephanie Powell WattsBook Page
486No Place To Call HomeJJ Bola
Media Diversified
487Noisy nightMac. BarnettBKLYN
488Not ImpossibleMick EbelingDo Lectures
489NOW LET’S DANCEKARINE LAMBERTBook Riot
490Now the last remaining stories, sourced from libraries and private collections, including those of Fitzgerald’s family, have been compiled into a collection editedAnne Margaret Daniel.The Week
491Obama: An Intimate PortraitPete SouzaPeople
492On Balance
The Guardian 2
493On Eating InsectsNordic Food LabDo Lectures
494One Day We’ll All Be Dead and None of This Will MatterScaachi KoulThe Berry
495One MissionChris FussellDo Lectures
496One, Two, Three, MoreHelen Levitt, introduction by Geoff Dyer
Star Tribune
497Onward: How Starbucks Fought For It’s Life Without Losing It’s SoulHoward Schultz
12 Five Capital
498OriginDan BrownThe Week
499Orphan IslandLaurel Snyder
Star Tribune
500Other MindsPeter Godfrey-SmithDo Lectures
501Ottessa MoshfeghHomesick for Another WorldLit Hub
502
Our History of the 20th Century
The Guardian 2
503Out In The OpenJesús CarrascoAV Club
504Out of Our MindsKen RobinsonDo Lectures
505Paperbacks From HellGrady HendrixAV Club
506
Paradoxes of Green: Landscapes of a City-State
The Dirt
507Patricia LockwoodPriestdaddyLit Hub
508Peak PerformanceBrad StulbergDo Lectures
509PhoneWill SelfThe Week
510PIGLETTES,CLÉMENTINE BEAUVAISBook Riot
511PlumeIsabelle. SimlerBKLYN
512Polar bear’s underwearcreator. Tupera Tupera (Firm)BKLYN
513PrinciplesRay DalioDo Lectures
514Professional crocodileGiovanna ZoboliBKLYN
515Psyched UpDaniel McGinnDo Lectures
516Published: 9/12/2017Penguin Press
Library Reads
517
Qatar: Securing the Global Ambitions of a City-State
Bloomberg Quint
518QuicksandMalin Persson Giolito
Sarah’s Book Shelves
519Rachel IngallsMrs. CalibanLit Hub
520Rachel KhongGoodbye, VitaminLit Hub
521Raiders of the Lost Ark
The East Hampton Star
522Ramp HollowSteven StollLit Hub
523Real Artists Don’t StarveJeff GoinsDo Lectures
524Reality Is Not What It Seems: The Journey to Quantum GravityCarlo Rovelli
Washington Independent
525Reckless DaughterDavid Yaffe
Now Toronto
526RecoveryRussell BrandDo Lectures
527Red AgainBarbara Lehman
Star Tribune
528Red Famine
The East Hampton Star
529Red Famine: Stalin’s War on UkraineAnne Applebaum
Washington Independent
530RefugeeAlan Gratz
A Bookshelf Monstrosity
531Reset: My Fight for Inclusion and Lasting ChangeEllen Pao
Cosmopolitan
532Respectable
The Guardian 2
533RestAlex Soojung-Kim PangDo Lectures
534Return to the Dark Valley (trans. Howard Curtis)Santiago GamboaLit Hub
535Rich People ProblemsKevin KwanEsquire
536Rich People Problems (From the Crazy Rich trilogy)Kevin Kwan
Media Diversified
537Robert Lowell: Setting the River on FireKay Redfield Jamison
The Seattle Times
538Rotten RowPetinah Gappah
Media Diversified
539RoughneckJeff Lemire
Simon McDonald
540Rumi: Selected PoemsTranslated by Coleman Barks, illustrated by Marian Bantjes
Star Tribune
541Saints and MisfitsS.K. Ali
Star Tribune
542Saints for All OccasionsJ. COURTNEY SULLIVAN
The Washington Post
543Salt Fat Acid HeatSamin Nosrat, Wendy MacNaughton and Michael PollanDo Lectures
544SatelliteNick Lake
Star Tribune
545Science In The SoulRichard DawkinsDo Lectures
546ScytheNeal Shusterman
A Bookshelf Monstrosity
547Seeds of RevengeWendy Tyson
Hidden Staircase
548SelfieWill StorrDo Lectures
549Seven Fallen Feathers: Racism, Death, and Hard Truths in a Northern CityTanya TalagaThe Globe
550Seven Sugar CubesClodagh Beresford DunneThe Journal
551Sex and Secularism
The Guardian
552Shop Class as Soulcraft: An Inquiry Into the Value of WorkMatthew Crawford
Peak Performance
553Side HustleChris GuillebeauDo Lectures
554Since I laid my burden downBrontez PurnellBKLYN
555Since We FellDennis LehaneBook Page
556Six Minutes in May
The Guardian 2
557Sleeping By The MississippiAlec SothDo Lectures
558Slugfest : inside the epic fifty-year battle between Marvel and DCReed TuckerBKLYN
559Small Great Things: A NovelJodi Picoult
Library Reads
560Small WaltElizabeth Verdick, illustrated by Marc Rosenthal
Star Tribune
561Smaller HoursKevin Shaw
Maisonneuve
562So Much BluePERCIVAL EVERETTVulture
563SO MUCH LOVEREBECCA ROSENBLUMBook Riot
564SOLITUDE: A SINGULAR LIFE IN A CROWDED WORLDMichael HarrisMacleans
565Somebody with a Little Hammer: EssaysMary GaitskillHoustonia
566Sons and Soldiers: The Untold Story of the Jews Who Escaped the Nazis and Returned with the U.S. Army to Fight HitlerBruce Henderson
Washington Independent
567Sorry to Disrupt the PeacePatty Yumi Cottrell
Star Tribune
568South Pole StationThe Coil
569
Speak for Yourself: New Writing from Orkney and New Zealand
The Bottle Imp
570Spineless: The Science of Jellyfish and the Art of Growing a BackboneJuli Berwald
Cosmopolitan
571Spoiler Alert: The Hero DiesMichael Ausiello
Hidden Staircase
572Sputnik’s ChildrenTerri FavroThe Globe
573Stand by MeJudi CurtinThe Journal
574Star-crossedBarbara. DeeBKLYN
575Start With WhySimon Sinek
12 Five Capital
576Status AnxietyAlain de Botton
Peak Performance
577Stephen Colbert’s Midnight ConfessionsStephen Colbert and The Staff of the Late Show with Stephen ColbertEsquire
578Sticky Fingers
The East Hampton Star
579Still Life with Feeding Snake
The Guardian
580Strange The DreamerLaini TaylorAV Club
581Strange WeatherJoe HillHeavy
582Stranger in the WoodsMichael Finkel
Peak Performance
583Stranger, Baby
The Guardian 2
584Success: In Sport and LifePercy Cerutty
Peak Performance
585Swing Time
The Guardian
586Syria: Recipes from Home
The Guardian 2
587Tales of Wonder by Jack ZipesJack Zipes
Star Tribune
588Tangleweed and BrineDeirdre Sullivan illustrated by Karen VaughanThe Journal
589Teach Like FinlandTimothy D. WalkerDo Lectures
590Tell Me How it Ends
The Guardian
591Testosterone Rex
The Guardian
592Thank You For Being LateThomas Friedman
12 Five Capital
593Thanks, Obama: My Hopey, Changey White House YearsDavid LittEsquire
594The 2% Rule To Get You Debt Free FastAlex and Cassie MichaelDo Lectures
595The 57 busDashka SlaterBKLYN
596The 7th Function of Language
The Guardian
597The AbundanceAnnie Dillard
Brooklyn Based
598The Accusation: Forbidden Stories from Inside North KoreaBandi, translated by Deborah SmithThe Globe
599The AlmanacLia LeendertzDo Lectures
600The Ambassadors
The Guardian 2
601The Ambulance Drivers: Hemingway, Dos Passos, and a Friendship Made and Lost in WarJames McGrath Morris
Washington Independent
602The Amputee’s Guide to SexJillian Weise
The Los Angeles Review
603The Annotated African American FolktalesEdited by Henry Louis Gates Jr. and Maria Tatar
Star Tribune
604The Apparitionists: A Tale of Phantoms, Fraud, Photography, and the Man Who Captured Lincoln’s GhostPeter Manseau
Publishers Weekly
605The Art of Death: Writing the Final StoryEdwidge Danticat
Journal Sentinel
606The Art of Failing
The Guardian 2
607The Art Of The LarderClaire ThomsonDo Lectures
608The Asshole Survival GuideRobert I SuttonDo Lectures
609The Atlas of Forgotten Places: A NovelJenny D. Williams
Washington Independent
610The autobiography of Gucci Mane1980- author. Gucci ManeBKLYN
611The Awkward Thoughts of WW. Kamau BellThe Root
612The Bedlam Stacks
The Guardian 2
613The Big Book of the Continental OpDashiell Hammett, Richard Layman and Julie M. RivettNPR
614The Blood of Emmett TillTimothy B. TysonBook Page
615The Bone MotherDavid DemchukThe Globe
616The Book of Forgotten AuthorsChristopher FowlerCulture Fly
617The Book of JoanLidia YuknavitchBustle
618
The Book Smugglers of Timbuktu
The Guardian 2
619The BorrowedChan Ho-keiThe Globe
620The Boy Behind the Curtain
The Guardian 2
621The Brand New CatastropheThe Coil
622THE BURNING GIRLClaire MessudMacleans
623
The Burning Time: Henry VIII, Bloody Mary and the Protestant Martyrs of Londonby Virginia Rounding
Washington Independent
624The Calm CompanyJason FriedDo Lectures
625The CarpenterJon Gordon
Peak Performance
626
The Case Against Education: Why the Education System Is a Waste of Time and Money
Bloomberg Quint
627
The Castle Cross the Magnet Carter
The Guardian 2
628The Chilbury Ladies’ ChoirJennifer RyanHeavy
629The ChoicePhilly McMahon with Niall KellyThe Journal
630The ChokeSofie Laguna
Simon McDonald
631THE CITY OF BRASSS.A. CHAKRABORTY
Kate’s Kairos
632The Clothesline SwingAhmad Danny RamadanThe Globe
633The Collected Essays of Elizabeth HardwickDARRYL PINCKNEYVulture
634The Complete Stories of Leonora CarringtonLeonora CarringtonBKLYN
635The Crown: The Official Companion, Vol. 1Robert Lacey
Star Tribune
636The Cubs WayTom VerducciDo Lectures
637The Dark Flood Rises
The Guardian 2
638The Death and Life of Great American CitiesJane Jacobs
Maisonneuve
639The Death of the FronsacNeal Ascherson
The Bottle Imp
640The Dessers Of New York
Publishers Weekly 2
641The DestroyersChristopher BollenEsquire
642The Enigma of Reason
The Guardian 2
643The Epiphany MachineDavid Burr Gerrard
Brooklyn Based
644The Essex SerpentSarah Perry
Star Tribune
645The Evangelicals: The Struggle to Shape AmericaFrances FitzGeraldSlate 2
646The Evenings
The Guardian 2
647The Evolution of Beauty: How Darwin’s Forgotten Theory of Mate Choice Shapes the Animal World — and UsRichard O. Prum
The New York Times
648The Exact Nature of Our Wrongs: A NovelJanet Peery
Washington Independent
649The ExileCathy Scott-Clark and Adrian LevyThe Week
650The Fall Guy
The Guardian 2
651The Far Away BrothersLauren Markham
Maisonneuve
652The First Blast to Awaken Women DegenerateRachel McCrum
Maisonneuve
653The Fish That Ate The WhaleRich Cohen
12 Five Capital
654The Force
The East Hampton Star
655The gentleman’s guide to vice and virtueMackenzi. LeeBKLYN
656The Ghost of Helen AddisonCharles E. McGarry
The Bottle Imp
657The Girl BeforeJP DelaneyNet Galley
658The Golden Legend
The Guardian 2
659The Good Daugher
The Guardian 2
660The Great EdgeGeorge Gunn
The Bottle Imp
661The Grip of Itjac jemcHeauxs
662The Happiness ProjectGretchen Rubin
12 Five Capital
663The Hidden Life Of TreesPeter WohllebenDo Lectures
664The Hiding Place
Novels + Nonfiction
665The History of the Future
The Guardian 2
666The HoleHye-Young Pyun
Dont Mind The Mess
667The House of Government
The Guardian
668The Husband’s SecretLiane Moriarty
12 Five Capital
669
The Ideas Industry: How Pessimists, Partisans and Plutocrats Are Transforming the Marketplace of Ideas
Bloomberg Quint
670
The Impossible Revolution: Making Sense of the Syrian Tragedy
Bloomberg Quint
671The Industries Of The FutureAlec RossDo Lectures
672The Intrusions
The Guardian
673The Invisibility Cloak
Bloomberg Quint
674The Invisible Life of Euridice GusmaoMartha BatalhaCulture Fly
675
The Island at the End of Everything
The Guardian 2
676The Keeper Of Lost ThingsRuth HoganDo Lectures
677The Kelloggs: The Battling Brothers of Battle CreekHoward Markel
Star Tribune
678The KingdomEmmanuel Carrere
Nick The Writer
679The Last Days Of Café LeilaDonia BijanAV Club
680The Last LectureRandy Pausch
12 Five Capital
681The Last LondonIain Sinclair
The Bottle Imp
682The LaurasSara TaylorBustle
683The Leavers
Publishers Weekly 2
684The Little Book Of TidyingBeth PennDo Lectures
685The Locals
The Guardian
686The Man From the TrainBill James and Rachel McCarthy James
Star Tribune
687The Midnight SunCecilia EkbackThe Globe
688The Mindful Art Of Wild SwimmingTessa WardleyDo Lectures
689The Modern Cook’s YearAnna JonesDo Lectures
690The Museum of Extraordinary ThingsAlice Hoffman
A Bookshelf Monstrosity
691The Music ShopRachel JoyceCulture Fly
692The Neo GeneralistRichard Martin and Kenneth Mikkelson
Peak Performance
693The NestCynthia D’Aprix Sweeney
A Bookshelf Monstrosity
694
The New Landscape Declaration: A Call to Action for the Twenty-First Century
The Dirt
695The Night CircusErin Morgenstern
Hidden Staircase
696The Novel of the Century
The Guardian 2
697The NutcrackerShobhna Patel
Star Tribune
698The Obama InheritanceLit Hub
699The OdysseyHomer (translated by Emily Wilson)Slate
700The Omnivore’s Dilemma
The Guardian 2
701
The Once and Future Liberal: After Identity Politics
The Guardian
702
The One Device: The Secret History of the iPhone
Bloomberg Quint
703The One-Cent Magenta: Inside the Quest to Own the Most Valuable Stamp in the WorldJames Barron
Washington Independent
704The Other Half of HappinessAyisha Malik
Media Diversified
705
The People Are Going to Rise like the Waters upon Your Shore
The Coil
706The People Are Going to Rise Like the Waters upon Your Shore: A Story of American RageJared Yates Sexton
Washington Independent
707The Perfect GirlGilly MacMillan
A Bookshelf Monstrosity
708The Power Of MomentsChip and Dan HeathDo Lectures
709The President’s GardensMuhsin Al-Ramli
Media Diversified
710
The Presidents and the Constitution
Bloomberg Quint
711
The Prime of Miss Jean Brodie
The Guardian
712The Princess DiaristCarrie Fisher
Hidden Staircase
713The Red Parts
The Guardian 2
714The River of ConsciousnessOliver SacksEsquire
715The River of KingsThe Coil
716The Roanoke GirlsAmy EngelCulture Fly
717The rooster who would not be quiet!Carmen Agra. DeedyBKLYN
718The Runaway SpeciesDavid Eagleman and Anthony BrandtDo Lectures
719The Running HareJohn Lewis-StempelDo Lectures
720The Sagrada Família: The Astonishing Story of Gaudí’s Unfinished MasterpieceGijs Van Hensbergen
Washington Independent
721The Sarah BookScott McClanahan
Maisonneuve
722The SavageThe Coil
723THE SCANDAL/BEARTOWNFREDRIK BACKMANBook Riot
724The Schooldays of JesusJ.M. COETZEEVulture
725The Seabird’s CryAdam NicolsonDo Lectures
726
The Second World Wars: How the First Global Conflict Was Fought and Won
Bloomberg Quint
727The Secret LifeAndrew O’HaganDo Lectures
728The Secret Life of Cows
The Guardian
729The Sellout
The Guardian 2
730THE SEVENTH FUNCTION OF LANGUAGELaurent BinetMacleans
731The souls of China : the return of religion after MaoIan JohnsonBKLYN
732The Startup WayEric RiesDo Lectures
733The Storied Life of A.J. FikryGabrielle Zevin
Hidden Staircase
734The Story of a Brief Marriage
The Guardian
735The Stranger in the Woods: The Extraordinary Story of The Last True HermitMichael Finkel
Indigo’s Books
736The Sun & Her FlowersRupi Kaur
Indigo’s Books
737The Tartan Turban
The Guardian 2
738The TB12 MethodTom BradyDo Lectures
739The Tea Girl of Hummingbird LaneLisa See
The Paperback Princess
740The Telomere EffectDr. Elizabeth Blackburn and Dr. Elissa EpelDo Lectures
741The Therapy HouseJulie ParsonsThe Journal
742The Things I Would Tell You
The Guardian
743The ThirstJo NesboThe Globe
744The Twins in the DomeBob Showers
Star Tribune
745The Unwomanly Face of WarSvetlana AlexievichLit Hub
746The Vanity Fair Diaries: 1983-1992Tina BrownPeople
747The Vietnam War: An Intimate HistoryGeoffrey C. Ward and Ken Burns
Star Tribune
748The WanderersMeg Howrey
Dont Mind The Mess
749The Way Of The IcemanWim HoffDo Lectures
750The White Book
The Guardian
751The WindfallDiksha BasuEsquire
752The Wolf, The Duck & The MouseMac Barnett, illustrations by Jon Klassen
Star Tribune
753The Women in the Castle: A NovelJessica Shattuck
Washington Independent
754The Word is MurderAnthony Horowitz
Simon McDonald
755The Wrong Way to Save Your Life: EssaysMegan StielstraBustle
756The Zoo
The Guardian 2
757
There Your Heart Lies by Mary Gordon
The Guardian
758They Both Die at the EndAdam Silvera
Star Tribune
759Things a Bright Girl Can Do
The Guardian 2
760Things Are What You Make Of ThemAdam J KurtzDo Lectures
761Things Not to DoJessica Westhead
Maisonneuve
762Things We Lost in the FireMariana Enriquez, translated by Megan McDowellThe Globe
763This is Memorial DeviceDavid Keenan
The Bottle Imp
764This Long Pursuit: Reflections of a Romantic BiographerRichard HolmesSlate 2
765
Thoreau and the Language of Trees
The Guardian
766Ties
Bloomberg Quint
767To Be a Machine
The Guardian 2
768To Die in Spring
The Guardian
769To Have or To BeErich Fromm
Peak Performance
770To the Back of BeyondPeter Stamm
Star Tribune
771Too Fat, Too Slutty, Too LoudAnne Helen PetersenBustle
772
Transmaterial Next: A Catalog of Materials That Define Our Future
The Dirt
773Tribe Of MentorsTim FerrisDo Lectures
774Trio: The Tale of a Three-legged CatAndrea Wisnewski
Star Tribune
775Trophy SonDouglas Brunt
Sarah’s Book Shelves
776
Troublemakers: Silicon Valley’s Coming of Age
Bloomberg Quint
777Unbelievable: My Front-Row Seat to the Craziest Campaign in American HistoryKaty Tur
Brooklyn Based
778Uncommon Type: Some StoriesTom HanksUSA Today
779UnqualifiedAnna FarisThe Berry
780UnshakableTony RobbinsDo Lectures
781UnspeakableDilys Rose
The Bottle Imp
782UnsubMeg Gardiner
Simon McDonald
783UpgradeGestaltenDo Lectures
784UTOPIA FOR REALISTSRUTGER BREGMANBook Riot
785VacationlandJohn HodgmanAV Club
786Valeria LuiselliTell Me How it EndsLit Hub
787Van LifeFoster HuntingtonDo Lectures
788Victor LaValleThe ChangelingLit Hub
789Viking Britain
The Guardian 2
790Vincent and Theo van Gogh : a dual biographyJan. HulskerBKLYN
791Vinyl Freak: Love Letters to a Dying MediumJohn Corbett
The Stranger
792WarcrossMarie Lu
The Paperback Princess
793Washing Hugh MacDiarmid’s SocksMagi Gibson
The Bottle Imp
794Watch Me DisappearJanelle Brown
Hidden Staircase
795We Are OkayNina LaCourHeavy
796We Come Apart
The Guardian 2
797We that are youngPreti Taneja
Media Diversified
798We’re Going to Need More WineGabrielle UnionThe Root
799What a Fish Knows
The Guardian 2
800What Are We Even Doing With Our LivesChelsea Marshall and Mary DautermanThe Berry
801What Girls Are Made OfElana K. Arnold
Star Tribune
802
What Language Do I Dream In?
The Guardian 2
803What She Ate: Six Remarkable Women and the Food That Tells Their StoriesLaura ShapiroNPR
804What We LoseZinzi ClemmonsLit Hub
805When I Grow Up I Want To Be a List of Further PossibilitiesChen Chen
New York Public Library
806When I Hit You
The Guardian 2
807When They Go Low, We Go HighPhilip CollinsDo Lectures
808When We Speak of Nothing
The Guardian
809Where the Sun Shines OutThe Coil
810Where the Water Goes: Life and Death Along the Colorado RiverDavid Owen
Washington Independent
811White FurJardine Libaire
Sarah’s Book Shelves
812Why I Am Not A FeministJessa CrispinAV Club
813Why We SleepMatthew WalkerDo Lectures
814Wildlife Photographer Of The YearRosamund Kidman CoxDo Lectures
815
William Wegman: Being Human
Publishers Weekly 2
816WimmeraMark Brandi
Simon McDonald
817Wind Resistance
The Guardian
818Wine All the TimeMarisa A. RossThe Berry
819Winter DanceMarion Dane Bauer, illustrated by Richard Jones
Star Tribune
820Wise TreesThe Dirt
821With LoveRob Evans and Chris RobertsDo Lectures
822Wolf Hall
Novels + Nonfiction
823Wolf in the snowMatthew CordellBKLYN
824Women and Power
The Guardian
825
Wonder Beyond Belief: On Christianity
The Guardian
826Word By Word: The Secret Life Of DictionariesKory StamperAV Club
827Wounds: A Memoir of War & LoveFergal KeaneThe Journal
828Xialou GuoNine ContinentsLit Hub
829You Will Know Me
The Guardian 2
830Young Jane YoungGabrielle ZevinHoustonia


72 Best Book Sources/Lists Of 2017



SourceArticle
12 Five Capital TEAM FAVORITES: BEST BOOKS OF 2017
A Bookshelf Monstrosity My Top 10 books of 2017
AV Club The A.V. Club’s favorite books of 2017
BBC Culture The 10 Best Books Of 2017
BKLYN BKLYN BookMatch: Our 50 Favorite Books from 2017
Bloomberg Quint Must-Reads of 2017: From Space to Chinese Noir
Book Page BEST BOOKS OF 2017
Book Riot OUR BEST 2017 READS FROM OUTSIDE THE USA
Brooklyn Based Our favorite books from 2017
Bustle 17 Books Every Woman Should Read From 2017
Chicago Public Library Best Books of 2017: Top Ten
Cosmopolitan The 13 Best Books of 2017
Culture Fly BEST BOOKS OF 2017: TIN MAN, THE HATE YOU GIVE, THE MUSIC SHOP AND MORE
Do Lectures 100 Must-Read Books Of 2017
Dont Mind The Mess Best Books of 2017
Esquire The Best Books of 2017
Girl Reporter Books of 2017
Heauxs WHAT BAD ASS FEMINISTS READ THIS YEAR: SAMANTHA IRBY
Heavy Christmas Gifts for Readers: Best New Books of 2017
Hidden Staircase TTT: My Favorite 2017 Reads.
Houstonia These Are The Books We Loved in 2017
Indigo’s Books Indigo Names the Best Books of 2017
Journal Sentinel Best Books of 2017: Jim Higgins’ picks
Kate’s Kairos BEST OF 2017 BOOK RECOMMENDATIONS
Library Journal TOP TEN BOOKS OF 2017
Library Reads Favorite of Favorites 2017
Lit Hub LITERARY HUB’S FAVORITE BOOKS OF 2017
Macleans If you missed these 10 books in 2017, go back and read them now
Maisonneuve Maisy’s Best Books of 2017
Media Diversified Top 15 Books by Novelists of Colour Published in 2017
Net Galley NetGalley UK’s Top Ten Books of 2017!
New York Public Library NYPL’s 10 Best Books of 2017
Newsday Best books of 2017: ‘Lincoln in the Bardo,’ ‘Killers of the Flower Moon’ and more
Nick The Writer The Top 5 Books of 2017
Novels + Nonfiction My Top Ten Favorite Books I Read In 2017 #TopTenTuesday
Now Toronto The 10 best books of 2017
NPR Maureen Corrigan Picks Books To Close Out A Chaotic 2017
Peak Performance Peak Performance Newsletter Top Books of 2017
People The Top 10 Books of 2017
Publishers Weekly Best Books
Publishers Weekly 2 Our Favorit Books of 2017
Sarah’s Book Shelves Best Books of 2017
Simon McDonald The Best Books of 2017
Sit Tableside Favorite Books of 2017
Slate Katy Waldman’s 10 Favorite Books of 2017
Slate 2 Laura Miller’s 10 Favorite Books of 2017
Star Tribune Your ultimate guide to holiday books
The Berry These are the 10 best books written by women in 2017
The Bottle Imp Best Scottish Books Of 2017
The Coil Best Books of 2017
The Coker Family THE 7 BEST BOOKS I READ THIS YEAR
The Cornell Daily Sun Top 10 Books of 2017
The Cut 15 Great Books by Women We Read This Year
The Dirt Best Books of 2017
The East Hampton Star The Year’s 10 Best Books
The Globe The Globe 100
The Guardian Best books of 2017 – part one
The Guardian 2 Best books of 2017 – part two
The Journal These are the best Irish books of 2017
The Los Angeles Review LAR’S THE BEST BOOKS OF THE YEAR
The New York Times The 10 Best Books of 2017
The Paperback Princess TOP 10 BOOKS OF 2017
The Root The 16 Best Books of the Year by Black Authors
The Seattle Times Mary Ann Gwinn’s favorite books of 2017
The Stranger Top 20 Books of 2017
The Washington Post Best Books 2017
The Week Best books for 2017: 22 must-read novels including Lincoln in the Bardo
USA Today 10 books we loved reading in 2017
Vulture The 10 Best Books of 2017
Washington Independent Our Favorite Books of 2017
Waterstones THE WATERSTONES BOOK OF THE YEAR
Women 10 Best Books of 2017 To Get You Through This Holiday Season