Best Books, Fiction & Literature, Literature, Nonfiction

The Best Southern Gothic Books Of All-Time

Best Southern Gothic Books

“What are the best Southern Gothic Books?” We looked at 218 of the top Southern Gothic books, aggregating and ranking them so we could answer that very question!

The top 53 titles, all appearing on 2 or more “Best Southern Gothic” book lists, are ranked below by how many lists they appear on. The remaining 150+ titles, as well as the lists we used, are in alphabetical order at the bottom of the page.

For more gothic literature make sure to take a look at our Best Gothic Horror book list!

Also take a look at our sister website, Cinema Dailies, for the Best Southern Gothic Films of all-time!

Happy Scrolling!



Top 53 Southern Gothic Books



53 .) A Good Man is Hard to Find and Other Stories by Flannery O’Connor

 A Good Man is Hard to Find and Other Stories Lists It Appears On:

  • Goodreads
  • Susan Gabriel

This now classic book revealed Flannery O’Connor as one of the most original and provocative writers to emerge from the South. Her apocalyptic vision of life is expressed through grotesque, often comic situations in which the principal character faces a problem of salvation: the grandmother, in the title story, confronting the murderous Misfit; a neglected four-year-old boy looking for the Kingdom of Christ in the fast-flowing waters of the river; General Sash, about to meet the final enemy.

Purchase / Learn More



52 .) A Confederacy of Dunces by John Kennedy Toole

 A Confederacy of Dunces Lists It Appears On:

  • Goodreads
  • Susan Gabriel

“A green hunting cap squeezed the top of the fleshy balloon of a head. The green earflaps, full of large ears and uncut hair and the fine bristles that grew in the ears themselves, stuck out on either side like turn signals indicating two directions at once. Full, pursed lips protruded beneath the bushy black moustache and, at their corners, sank into little folds filled with disapproval and potato chip crumbs.” Meet Ignatius J. Reilly, the hero of John Kennedy Toole’s tragicomic tale, A Confederacy of Dunces. This 30-year-old medievalist lives at home with his mother in New Orleans, pens his magnum opus on Big Chief writing pads he keeps hidden under his bed, and relays to anyone who will listen the traumatic experience he once had on a Greyhound Scenicruiser bound for Baton Rouge. (“Speeding along in that bus was like hurtling into the abyss.”) But Ignatius’s quiet life of tyrannizing his mother and writing his endless comparative history screeches to a halt when he is almost arrested by the overeager Patrolman Mancuso–who mistakes him for a vagrant–and then involved in a car accident with his tipsy mother behind the wheel. One thing leads to another, and before he knows it, Ignatius is out pounding the pavement in search of a job. Over the next several hundred pages, our hero stumbles from one adventure to the next. His stint as a hotdog vendor is less than successful, and he soon turns his employers at the Levy Pants Company on their heads. Ignatius’s path through the working world is populated by marvelous secondary characters: the stripper Darlene and her talented cockatoo; the septuagenarian secretary Miss Trixie, whose desperate attempts to retire are constantly, comically thwarted; gay blade Dorian Greene; sinister Miss Lee, proprietor of the Night of Joy nightclub; and Myrna Minkoff, the girl Ignatius loves to hate. The many subplots that weave through A Confederacy of Dunces are as complicated as anything you’ll find in a Dickens novel, and just as beautifully tied together in the end. But it is Ignatius–selfish, domineering, and deluded, tragic and comic and larger than life–who carries the story. He is a modern-day Quixote beset by giants of the modern age. His fragility cracks the shell of comic bluster, revealing a deep streak of melancholy beneath the antic humor. John Kennedy Toole committed suicide in 1969 and never saw the publication of his novel. Ignatius Reilly is what he left behind, a fitting memorial to a talented and tormented life.

Purchase / Learn More



51 .) Absalom, Absalom by William Faulkner

 Absalom, Absalom Lists It Appears On:

  • Book Riot
  • Goodreads

Published in 1936, Absalom, Absalom! is considered by many to be William Faulkner’s masterpiece. Although the novel’s complex and fragmented structure poses considerable difficulty to readers, the book’s literary merits place it squarely in the ranks of America’s finest novels. The story concerns Thomas Sutpen, a poor man who finds wealth and then marries into a respectable family. His ambition and extreme need for control bring about his ruin and the ruin of his family. Sutpen’s story is told by several narrators, allowing the reader to observe variations in the saga as it is recounted by different speakers. This unusual technique spotlights one of the novel’s central questions: To what extent can people know the truth about the past? (from bookrags.com)

Purchase / Learn More



50 .) Bastard Out of Carolina by Dorothy Allison

 Bastard Out of Carolina Lists It Appears On:

  • Gothic Society
  • JC Sasser Books

Greenville County, South Carolina, is a wild, lush place that is home to the Boatwright family-a tight-knit clan of rough-hewn, hard- drinking men who shoot up each other’s trucks, and indomitable women who get married young and age too quickly. At the heart of this story is Ruth Anne Boatwright, known simply as Bone, a bastard child who observes the world around her with a mercilessly keen perspective. When her stepfather Daddy Glen, “cold as death, mean as a snake,” becomes increasingly more vicious toward her, Bone finds herself caught in a family triangle that tests the loyalty of her mother, Anney-and leads to a final, harrowing encounter from which there can be no turning back.

Purchase / Learn More



49 .) Cat on a Hot Tin Roof by Tennessee Williams

 Cat on a Hot Tin Roof Lists It Appears On:

  • Goodreads
  • Solutions

Cat on a Hot Tin Roof first heated up Broadway in 1955 with its gothic American story of brothers vying for their dying father’s inheritance amid a whirlwind of sexuality, untethered in the person of Maggie the Cat. The play also daringly showcased the burden of sexuality repressed in the agony of her husband, Brick Pollitt. In spite of the public controversy Cat stirred up, it was awarded the Pulitzer Prize and the Drama Critics Circle Award for that year. Williams, as he so often did with his plays, rewrote Cat on a Hot Tin Roof for many years—the present version was originally produced at the American Shakespeare Festival in 1974 with all the changes that made Williams finally declare the text to be definitive, and was most recently produced on Broadway in the 2003–2004 season. This definitive edition also includes Williams&rsquoi; essay “Person-to-Person,” Williams’ notes on the various endings, and a short chronology of the author’s life. One of America’s greatest living playwrights, as well as a friend and colleague of Williams, Edward Albee has written a concise introduction to the play from a playwright’s perspective, examining the candor, sensuality, power, and impact of Cat on a Hot Tin Roof then and now.

Purchase / Learn More



48 .) Citrus County by John Brandon

 Citrus County Lists It Appears On:

  • Gothic Society
  • Publishers Weekly

There shouldn’t be a Citrus County. Teenage romance should be difficult, but not this difficult. Boys like Toby should cause trouble but not this much. The moon should glow gently over children safe in their beds. Uncles in their rockers should be kind. Teachers should guide and inspire. Manatees should laze and palm trees sway and snakes keep to their shady spots under the azalea thickets. The air shouldn’t smell like a swamp. The stars should twinkle. Shelby should be her own hero, the first hero of Citrus County. She should rescue her sister from underground, rescue Toby from his life. Her destiny should be a hero’s destiny.

Purchase / Learn More



47 .) Deliverance by James Dickey

 Deliverance Lists It Appears On:

  • Goodreads
  • This Is Horror

The setting is the Georgia wilderness, where the state’s most remote white-water river awaits. In the thundering froth of that river, in its echoing stone canyons, four men on a canoe trip discover a freedom and exhilaration beyond compare. And then, in a moment of horror, the adventure turns into a struggle for survival as one man becomes a human hunter who is offered his own harrowing deliverance.

Purchase / Learn More



46 .) Eveningland: Stories by Michael Knight

 Eveningland: Stories Lists It Appears On:

  • Bitter Southerner
  • Garden And Gun

“Michael Knight is more than a master of the short story. He knows the true pace of life and does not cheat it, all the while offering whopping entertainment.”—Barry Hannah Long considered a master of the form and an essential voice in American fiction, Michael Knight’s stories have been lauded by writers such Ann Patchett, Elizabeth Gilbert, Barry Hannah, and Richard Bausch. Now, with Eveningland he returns to the form that launched his career, delivering an arresting collection of interlinked stories set among the “right kind of Mobile family” in the years preceding a devastating hurricane. Grappling with dramas both epic and personal, from the Deepwater Horizon oil spill to the “unspeakable misgivings of contentment,” Eveningland captures with crystalline poeticism and perfect authenticity of place the ways in which ordinary life astounds us with its complexity. A teenaged girl with a taste for violence holds a burglar hostage in her house on New Year’s Eve; a middle aged couple examines the intricacies of their marriage as they prepare to throw a party; and a real estate mogul in the throes of grief buys up all the property on an island only to be accused of madness by his daughters. These stories, told with economy and precision, infused with humor and pathos, excavate brilliantly the latent desires and motivations that drive life forward. Eveningland is a luminous collection from “a writer of the first rank.”(Esquire)

Purchase / Learn More



45 .) Everything That Rises Must Converge: Stories by Flannery O’Connor

 Everything That Rises Must Converge: Stories Lists It Appears On:

  • Goodreads
  • Susan Gabriel

Flannery O’Connor was working on Everything That Rises Must Converge at the time of her death. This collection is an exquisite legacy from a genius of the American short story, in which she scrutinizes territory familiar to her readers: race, faith, and morality. The stories encompass the comic and the tragic, the beautiful and the grotesque; each carries her highly individual stamp and could have been written by no one else.

Purchase / Learn More



44 .) House of Prayer No. 2 by Mark Richard

 House of Prayer No. 2 Lists It Appears On:

  • Gothic Society
  • Publishers Weekly

In this otherworldly memoir of extraordinary power, Mark Richard, an award-winning author, tells his story of growing up in the American South with a heady Gothic mix of racial tension and religious fervor. Called a “special child,” Southern social code for mentally—and physically—challenged children, Richard was crippled by deformed hips and was told he would spend his adult life in a wheelchair. During his early years in charity hospitals, Richard observed the drama of other broken boys’ lives, children from impoverished Appalachia, tobacco country lowlands, and Richmond’s poorest neighborhoods. The son of a solitary alcoholic father whose hair-trigger temper terrorized his family, and of a mother who sought inner peace through fasting, prayer, and scripture, Richard spent his bedridden childhood withdrawn into the company of books. As a young man, Richard, defying both his doctors and parents, set out to experience as much of the world as he could—as a disc jockey, fishing trawler deckhand, house painter, naval correspondent, aerial photographer, private investigator, foreign journalist, bartender and unsuccessful seminarian—before his hips failed him. While digging irrigation ditches in east Texas, he discovered that a teacher had sent a story of his to the Atlantic, where it was named a winner in the magazine’s national fiction contest launching a career much in the mold of Jack London and Mark Twain. A superbly written and irresistible blend of history, travelogue, and personal reflection, House of Prayer No. 2 is a remarkable portrait of a writer’s struggle with his faith, the evolution of his art, and of recognizing one’s singularity in the face of painful disability. Written with humor and a poetic force, this memoir is destined to become a modern classic.

Purchase / Learn More



43 .) Interview With a Vampire by Anne Rice

 Interview With a Vampire Lists It Appears On:

  • Book Riot
  • This Is Horror

Here are the confessions of a vampire. Hypnotic, shocking, and chillingly erotic, this is a novel of mesmerizing beauty and astonishing force—a story of danger and flight, of love and loss, of suspense and resolution, and of the extraordinary power of the senses. It is a novel only Anne Rice could write.

Purchase / Learn More



42 .) Joe by Larry Brown

 Joe Lists It Appears On:

  • Garden And Gun
  • Goodreads

“Brilliant . . . Larry Brown has slapped his own fresh tattoo on the big right arm of Southern Lit.” —The Washington Post Book World Now a major motion picture starring Nicolas Cage, directed by David Gordon Green. Joe Ransom is a hard-drinking ex-con pushing fifty who just won’t slow down–not in his pickup, not with a gun, and certainly not with women. Gary Jones estimates his own age to be about fifteen. Born luckless, he is the son of a hopeless, homeless wandering family, and he’s desperate for a way out. When their paths cross, Joe offers him a chance just as his own chances have dwindled to almost nothing. Together they follow a twisting map to redemption–or ruin.

Purchase / Learn More



41 .) Little Sister Death by William Gay

 Little Sister Death Lists It Appears On:

  • The Library
  • Unbound Worlds

David Binder is a young, successful writer living in Chicago and suffering from writer’s block. He stares at the blank page, and the blank page stares back—until inspiration strikes in the form of a ghost story that captivated him as a child. With his pregnant wife and young daughter in tow, he sets out to explore the myth of Virginia Beale, Faery Queen of the Haunted Dell. But as his investigation takes him deeper and deeper into the legacy of blood and violence that casts its shadow over the old Beale farm, Binder finds himself obsessed with a force that’s as wicked as it is seductive. A stirring literary rendition of Tennessee’s famed Curse of the Bell Witch, Little Sister Death skillfully toes the line between Southern Gothic and horror, and further cements William Gay’s legacy as not only one of the South’s finest writers, but among the best that American literature has to offer.

Purchase / Learn More



40 .) Provinces of Night by William Gay

 Provinces of Night Lists It Appears On:

  • Barnes & Noble
  • Goodreads

The year is 1952, and E.F. Bloodworth has returned to his home – a forgotten corner of Tennessee – after twenty years of roaming. The wife he walked out on has withered and faded. His three sons are grown and angry. Warren is a womanising alcoholic; Boyd is driven by jealousy to hunt down his wife’s lover; and Brady puts hexes on his enemies from his mother’s porch. Only Fleming, the old man’s grandson, treats him with respect and sees past all the hatred, realising the way it can poison a man’s soul. It is ultimately the love of Raven Lee, a sloe-eyed beauty from another town, that gives Fleming the courage to reject his family’s curse. In a tale redolent with the crumbling loyalties and age-old strife of the post-war American South made familiar to us by Cormac McCarthy, Gay’s characters inhabit a world driven by blood ties that strangle as they bind. A coming of age novel, a love story, and a portrait of a family torn apart, Provinces of Night introduced a distinctive new voice in American fiction and a superb cast of characters.

Purchase / Learn More



39 .) Salvation on Sand Mountain by Dennis Covington

 Salvation on Sand Mountain Lists It Appears On:

  • Goodreads
  • Publishers Weekly

It is Scottsboro, Alabama, in the fall of 1991. A snake-handling preacher by the name of Glendel Buford Summerford has just tried to murder his wife, Darlene, by snakebite. At gunpoint, he forces her to stick her arm in a box of rattlesnakes. She is bitten twice and nearly dies. The trial, which becomes a sensation throughout southern Appalachia, echoes familiar themes from a troubled secular world – marital infidelity, spouse abuse, and alcoholism – but it also raises questions about faith, forgiveness, redemption, and, of course, snakes. Glenn Summerford is convicted of attempted murder and sentenced to ninety-nine years in prison. When Dennis Covington covered the trial of Glenn Summerford for The New York Times, a world far beyond the trial opened up to him. Salvation on Sand Mountain begins with a crime and a trial and then becomes an extraordinary exploration of a place, a people, and an author’s descent into himself. The place is southern Appalachia – a country deep and unsettled, where the past and its culture collide with the economic and social realities of the present, leaving a residue of rootlessness, anxiety, and lawlessness. All-night video stores and tanning salons stand next to collapsed chicken farms and fundamentalist churches. The people are poor southern whites. Peculiar and insular, they are hill people of Scotch-Irish descent: religious mystics who cast out demons, speak in tongues, drink strychnine, run blowtorches up their arms, and drape themselves with rattlesnakes. There is Charles McGlocklin, the End-Time Evangelist; Cecil Esslinder, the red headed guitar player with the perpetual grin; Aunt Daisy, the prophetess; Brother Carl Porter; Elvis Presley Saylor;Gracie McAllister; Dewey Chafin; and the legendary Punkin Brown, all of whose faith illuminates these pages. And then there is Dennis Covington, himself Scotch-Irish, whose own family came down off of Sand Mountain two generations ago to work in the steel mills of Birmingham, and

Purchase / Learn More



38 .) Sanctuary by William Faulkner

 Sanctuary Lists It Appears On:

  • Goodreads
  • Publishers Weekly

Psychologically astute and wonderfully poetic, Sanctuary is a powerful novel examining the nature of true evil, through the prisms of mythology, local lore, and hard-boiled detective fiction. This is the dark, at times brutal, story of the kidnapping of Mississippi debutante Temple Drake, who introduces her own form of venality into the Memphis underworld where she is being held.

Purchase / Learn More



37 .) Serena by Ron Rash

 Serena Lists It Appears On:

  • Goodreads
  • The Library

The year is 1929, and newlyweds George and Serena Pemberton travel from Boston to the North Carolina mountains where they plan to create a timber empire. Although George has already lived in the camp long enough to father an illegitimate child, Serena is new to the mountains—but she soon shows herself to be the equal of any man, overseeing crews, hunting rattle-snakes, even saving her husband’s life in the wilderness. Together this lord and lady of the woodlands ruthlessly kill or vanquish all who fall out of favor. Yet when Serena learns that she will never bear a child, she sets out to murder the son George fathered without her. Mother and child begin a struggle for their lives, and when Serena suspects George is protecting his illegitimate family, the Pembertons’ intense, passionate marriage starts to unravel as the story moves toward its shocking reckoning. Rash’s masterful balance of violence and beauty yields a riveting novel that, at its core, tells of love both honored and betrayed.

Purchase / Learn More



36 .) Smonk by Tom Franklin

 Smonk Lists It Appears On:

  • Gothic Society
  • Publishers Weekly

It’s 1911 and the townsfolk of Old Texas, Alabama, have had enough. Every Saturday night for a year, E. O. Smonk has been destroying property, killing livestock, seducing women, cheating and beating men, all from behind the twin barrels of his Winchester 45-70 caliber over-and-under rifle. Syphilitic, consumptive, gouty, and goitered, an expert with explosives and knives. Smonk hates horses, goats, and the Irish, and it’s high time he was stopped. But capturing old Smonk won’t be easy, and putting him on trial could have shocking and disastrous consequences, considering the terrible secret the citizens of Old Texas are hiding.

Purchase / Learn More



35 .) Suttree by Cormac McCarthy

 Suttree Lists It Appears On:

  • Goodreads
  • Solutions

By the author of Blood Meridian and All the Pretty Horses, Suttree is the story of Cornelius Suttree, who has forsaken a life of privilege with his prominent family to live in a dilapidated houseboat on the Tennessee River near Knoxville. Remaining on the margins of the outcast community there–a brilliantly imagined collection of eccentrics, criminals, and squatters–he rises above the physical and human squalor with detachment, humor, and dignity.

Purchase / Learn More



34 .) The Bottoms by Joe Lansdale

 The Bottoms Lists It Appears On:

  • Goodreads
  • Tor

The narrator of The Bottoms is Harry Collins, an old man obsessively reflecting on certain key experiences of his childhood. In 1933, the year that forms the centerpiece of the narrative, Harry is 11 years old and living with his mother, father, and younger sister on a farm outside of Marvel Creek, Texas, near the Sabine River bottoms. Harry’s world changes forever when he discovers the corpse of a young black woman tied to a tree in the forest near his home. The woman, who is eventually identified as a local prostitute, has been murdered, molested, and sexually mutilated. She is also, as Harry will soon discover, the first in a series of similar corpses, all of them the victims of a new, unprecedented sort of monster: a traveling serial killer.

Purchase / Learn More



33 .) The Collected Stories by Eudora Welty

 The Collected Stories Lists It Appears On:

  • Goodreads
  • Susan Gabriel

Including the earlier collections A Curtain of Green, The Wide Net, The Golden Apples, and The Bride of the Innisfallen, as well as previously uncollected ones, these forty-one stories demonstrate Eudora Welty’s talent for writing from diverse points-of-view with “vision that is sweet by nature, always humanizing, uncannily objective, but never angry”

Purchase / Learn More



32 .) The Color Purple by Alice Walker

 The Color Purple Lists It Appears On:

  • Book Riot
  • JC Sasser Books

The Color Purple is a classic. With over a million copies sold in the UK alone, it is hailed as one of the all-time ‘greats’ of literature, inspiring generations of readers. Set in the deep American South between the wars, it is the tale of Celie, a young black girl born into poverty and segregation. Raped repeatedly by the man she calls ‘father’, she has two children taken away from her, is separated from her beloved sister Nettie and is trapped into an ugly marriage. But then she meets the glamorous Shug Avery, singer and magic-maker – a woman who has taken charge of her own destiny. Gradually, Celie discovers the power and joy of her own spirit, freeing her from her past and reuniting her with those she loves.

Purchase / Learn More



31 .) The Complete Stories by Flannery O’Connor

 The Complete Stories Lists It Appears On:

  • Goodreads
  • JC Sasser Books

A Good Man Is Ha Winner of the National Book Award The publication of this extraordinary volume firmly established Flannery O’Connor’s monumental contribution to American fiction. There are thirty-one stories here in all, including twelve that do not appear in the only two story collections O’Connor put together in her short lifetime—Everything That Rises Must Converge and A Good Man Is Hard to Find. O’Connor published her first story, “The Geranium,” in 1946, while she was working on her master’s degree at the University of Iowa. Arranged chronologically, this collection shows that her last story, “Judgement Day”—sent to her publisher shortly before her death—is a brilliantly rewritten and transfigured version of “The Geranium.” Taken together, these stories reveal a lively, penetrating talent that has given us some of the most powerful and disturbing fiction of the twentieth century. Also included is an introduction by O’Connor’s longtime editor and friend, Robert Giroux.

Purchase / Learn More



30 .) The Heaven of Mercury by Brad Watson

 The Heaven of Mercury Lists It Appears On:

  • Gothic Society
  • Publishers Weekly

Finus Bates has loved chatty, elegant Birdie Wells ever since he saw her cartwheel naked through the woods near the backwater town of Mercury, Mississippi, in 1917. Having “caught hold of some loose line in her that would attach itself to stray wildness” and never let go, he’s loved her for some eighty years: through their marriages to other people, through the mysterious early death of Birdie’s womanizing husband, Earl, and through all the poisonous accusations against Birdie by Earl’s no-good relatives. All during Mercury’s evolution from a sleepy backwater to a small city, Finus (reporter, radio host, and obit writer) has aimed to have the last word on its inhabitants, from obsequious undertaker Parnell Grimes to Euple Scarbrough, local encyclopedia of useless knowledge, and Vish, a real oldtime medicine woman. But ever loyal to Birdie, Finus won’t rush to unravel the mystery of her husband’s untimely passing—not until Birdie herself has entered Mercury’s heaven. A gorgeous portrayal of lifelong friendship, restless passion, marital discord accommodation, aging and remembrance, death and afterlife, The Heaven of Mercury is inscribed in prose so eerily fine it is one of life’s true pleasures. Early readers have compared Watson to William Faulkner, Flannery O’Connor, and Eudora Welty, and such distinguished ghosts surely grace this book. But there aren’t really any comparisons—earthy, inspired, twisted, funny, moving, and transcendent, Watson’s work is something not seen before.

Purchase / Learn More



29 .) The Little Friend by Donna Tartt

 The Little Friend Lists It Appears On:

  • Barnes & Noble
  • Goodreads

Bestselling author Donna Tartt returns with a grandly ambitious and utterly riveting novel of childhood, innocence and evil. The setting is Alexandria, Mississippi, where one Mother’s Day a little boy named Robin Cleve Dufresnes was found hanging from a tree in his parents’ yard. Twelve years later Robin’s murder is still unsolved and his family remains devastated. So it is that Robin’s sister Harriet – unnervingly bright, insufferably determined, and unduly influenced by the fiction of Kipling and Robert Louis Stevenson–sets out to unmask his killer. Aided only by her worshipful friend Hely, Harriet crosses her town’s rigid lines of race and caste and burrows deep into her family’s history of loss.

Purchase / Learn More



28 .) The New and Improved Romie Futch by Julia Elliott

 The New and Improved Romie Futch Lists It Appears On:

  • Garden And Gun
  • JC Sasser Books

Meet the South’s newest antihero: Romie Futch. Down on his luck and pining for his ex-wife, the fortysomething taxidermist spends his evenings drunkenly surfing the Internet, then passing out on his couch. In a last-ditch attempt to pay his mortgage, he becomes a research subject at the Center for Cybernetic Neuroscience, where “scientists” download humanities disciplines into his brain. Suddenly, Romie and his fellow guinea pigs are speaking in hifalutin SAT words and hashing out the intricacies of postmodern subjectivity. With his new and improved brain, Romie hopes to reclaim his marriage, revolutionize his life, and revive his artistic aspirations. While tracking down specimens for elaborate animatronic taxidermy dioramas, he learns of “Hogzilla,” a thousand-pound feral hog with supernatural traits that has been terrorizing the locals. As his Ahab-caliber obsession with bagging the beast brings him closer and closer to this lab-spawned monster, Romie gets pulled into an absurd and murky underworld of biotech operatives, FDA agents, and environmental activists.

Purchase / Learn More



27 .) The Robber Bridegroom by Eudora Welty

 The Robber Bridegroom Lists It Appears On:

  • Gothic Society
  • Southern Living

Legendary figures of Mississippi’s past – flatboatman Mike Fink and the dreaded Harp brothers – mingle with characters from Eudora Welty’s own imagination in an exuberant fantasy set along the Natchez Trace. Berry-stained bandit of the woods Jamie Lockhart steals Rosamond, the beautiful daughter of pioneer planter Clement Musgrove, to set in motion this frontier fairy tale. “For all her wild, rich fancy, Welty writes prose that is as disciplined as it is beautiful” (New Yorker)

Purchase / Learn More



26 .) The Secret Sense of Wildflower by Susan Gabriel

 The Secret Sense of Wildflower Lists It Appears On:

  • Goodreads
  • Susan Gabriel

“A quietly powerful story, at times harrowing but ultimately a joy to read.” – Kirkus Reviews (starred review, “for books of remarkable merit”) Also on Kirkus Reviews’ list of Best Books of 2012! Set in 1940s Appalachia, The Secret Sense of Wildflower tells the story of Louisa May “Wildflower” McAllister whose life has been shaped around the recent death of her beloved father in a sawmill accident. While her mother hardens in her grief, Wildflower and her three sisters must cope with their loss themselves, as well as with the demands of daily survival. Despite these hardships, Wildflower has a resilience that is forged with humor, a love of the land, and an endless supply of questions to God, who she isn’t so sure she agrees with. When Johnny Monroe, the town’s teenage ne’er-do-well, sets his sights on Wildflower, she must draw on the strength of her relations, both living and dead, to deal with his threat. With prose as lush and colorful as the American South, The Secret Sense of Wildflower is powerful and poignant, brimming with energy and angst, humor and hope. In its ability to create a truly original Southern voice, The Secret Sense of Wildflower establishes Gabriel as a thoughtful and powerful Southern writer.

Purchase / Learn More



25 .) The Sound and the Fury by William Faulkner

 The Sound and the Fury Lists It Appears On:

  • Goodreads
  • Susan Gabriel

The text of this Norton Critical Edition is that of the corrected edition scrupulously prepared by Noel Polk, whose textual note precedes the text. David Minter’s annotations are designed to assist the reader with obscure words and allusions. “Backgrounds” begins with the appendix Faulkner wrote in 1945 and sometimes referred to as another telling of The Sound and the Fury and includes a selection of Faulkner’s letters, excerpts from two Faulkner interviews, a memoir by Faulkner’s friend Ben Wasson, and both versions of Faulkner’s 1933 introduction to the novel. “Cultural and Historical Contexts” presents four different perspectives, two of them new to the second edition, on the place of the American South in history. Taken together, these works—by C. Vann Woodward, Richard H. King, Carolyn Porter, and Robert Penn Warren—provide the reader with valuable contexts for understanding the novel. “Criticism” includes seventeen essays on The Sound and the Fury that collectively trace changes in the way we have viewed this novel over the last four decades. The critics are Jean-Paul Sartre, Irving Howe, Ralph Ellison, Olga W. Vickery, Cleanth Brooks, Michael Millgate, John T. Irwin, Myra Jehlen, Donald M. Kartiganer, David Minter, Warwick Wadlington, John T. Matthews, Thadious M. Davis, Wesley Morris and Barbara Alverson Morris, Minrose C. Gwin, André Bleikasten, and Philip M. Weinstein. A revised Selected Bibliography also is included.

Purchase / Learn More



24 .) The Violent Bear It Away by Flannery O’Connor

 The Violent Bear It Away Lists It Appears On:

  • Goodreads
  • Sandman Books

First published in 1960, The Violent Bear It Away is now a landmark in American literature. It is a dark and absorbing example of the Gothic sensibility and bracing satirical voice that are united in Flannery O’Conner’s work. In it, the orphaned Francis Marion Tarwater and his cousins, the schoolteacher Rayber, defy the prophecy of their dead uncle–that Tarwater will become a prophet and will baptize Rayber’s young son, Bishop. A series of struggles ensues: Tarwater fights an internal battle against his innate faith and the voices calling him to be a prophet while Rayber tries to draw Tarwater into a more “reasonable” modern world. Both wrestle with the legacy of their dead relatives and lay claim to Bishop’s soul. O’Connor observes all this with an astonishing combination of irony and compassion, humor and pathos. The result is a novel whose range and depth reveal a brilliant and innovative writers acutely alert to where the sacred lives and to where it does not.

Purchase / Learn More



23 .) The Weight of This World by David Joy

 The Weight of This World Lists It Appears On:

  • Bitter Southerner
  • Garden And Gun

Critically acclaimed author David Joy, whose debut, Where All Light Tends to Go, was hailed as “a savagely moving novel that will likely become an important addition to the great body of Southern literature” (The Huffington Post), returns to the mountains of North Carolina with a powerful story about the inescapable weight of the past. A combat veteran returned from war, Thad Broom can’t leave the hardened world of Afghanistan behind, nor can he forgive himself for what he saw there. His mother, April, is haunted by her own demons, a secret trauma she has carried for years. Between them is Aiden McCall, loyal to both but unable to hold them together. Connected by bonds of circumstance and duty, friendship and love, these three lives are blown apart when Aiden and Thad witness the accidental death of their drug dealer and a riot of dope and cash drops in their laps. On a meth-fueled journey to nowhere, they will either find the grit to overcome the darkness or be consumed by it.

Purchase / Learn More



22 .) Theft by Finding: Diaries by David Sedaris

 Theft by Finding: Diaries Lists It Appears On:

  • Bitter Southerner
  • Garden And Gun

David Sedaris tells all in a book that is, literally, a lifetime in the making. For forty years, David Sedaris has kept a diary in which he records everything that captures his attention-overheard comments, salacious gossip, soap opera plot twists, secrets confided by total strangers. These observations are the source code for his finest work, and through them he has honed his cunning, surprising sentences. Now, Sedaris shares his private writings with the world. Theft by Finding, the first of two volumes, is the story of how a drug-abusing dropout with a weakness for the International House of Pancakes and a chronic inability to hold down a real job became one of the funniest people on the planet. Written with a sharp eye and ear for the bizarre, the beautiful, and the uncomfortable, and with a generosity of spirit that even a misanthropic sense of humor can’t fully disguise, Theft By Finding proves that Sedaris is one of our great modern observers. It’s a potent reminder that when you’re as perceptive and curious as Sedaris, there’s no such thing as a boring day.

Purchase / Learn More



21 .) Wicked Temper by Randy Thornhorn

 Wicked Temper Lists It Appears On:

  • Goodreads
  • Solutions

To Kill A Mockingbird collides with Deliverance! “Masterful…the lovechild of William Faulkner and H.P. Lovecraft…an unnerving literary experience.” ~ Kirkus Reviews “Thornhorn, where the hell have you been?” ~ William Peter Blatty (author of The Exorcist) In the long and jagged shadow of Riddle Top lies a darkling mountain world—-a world of unholy mirth and madness, of gods and demons you never knew existed. Hitch a wild-ass ride with two runaway teens—-the runty but tough preacher’s girl Tizzy Polk and her punk boyfriend Matthew. They might think they are Bonnie and Clyde, but they might also race headlong into an evil far greater than their own. They may come to see things darkly different and seldom seen on that bewitched mountain known below as Riddle Top. Take care, folks say in story and song. Watch your step. And beware up there where the wind doth howl like the hellhound electric. Up there, where Tizzy and Matthew come knocking on a strange door. For nobody knows what awaits once you’ve disturbed your disturbing host. Your hands are in his hands now. And the scariest thing of all? He’s got all the time in this world. A Tale Untold by a Riddle Top Magpie Stark, poetic, haunting: Wicked Temper unfolds like a waking fever dream, a rockabilly heart of darkness. The kind you can kill but it don’t stop beating. Wicked Temper is the premeditated prequel to Randy Thornhorn’s The Kestrel Waters. “One of the South’s wildest new voices…” ~ The Oxford American Magazine

Purchase / Learn More



20 .) Winter’s Bone by Daniel Woodrell

 Winter's Bone Lists It Appears On:

  • Goodreads
  • Susan Gabriel

“The sheriff’s deputy at the front door brings hard news to Ree Dolly. Her father has skipped bail on charges that he ran a crystal meth lab, and the Dollys will lose their house if he doesn’t show up for his next court date.

Ree’s father has disappeared before. The Dolly clan has worked the shadowy side of the law for generations, and arrests (and attempts to avoid them) are part of life in Rathlin Valley. But the house is all they have, and Ree’s father would never forfeit it to the bond company unless something awful happened. With two young brothers depending on her and a mother who’s entered a kind of second childhood, Ree knows she has to bring her father back, dead or alive, or else see her family turned out into the unforgiving cold.”

Purchase / Learn More



19 .) Yonder Stands Your Orphan by Barry Hannah

 Yonder Stands Your Orphan Lists It Appears On:

  • Gothic Society
  • Publishers Weekly

The story of how the denizens of a lakeside community in Mississippi are beset by madness, murder and sin in the form of Man Mortimer. Mortimer, a creature of the casinos who looks like the dead country singer Conway Twitty, is a killer who has turned mean and sick.

Purchase / Learn More



18 .) A Land More Kind Than Home by Wiley Cash

 A Land More Kind Than Home Lists It Appears On:

  • Goodreads
  • Susan Gabriel
  • The Library

Adventurous A stunning debut reminiscent of the beloved novels of John Hart and Tom Franklin, A Land More Kind Than Home is a mesmerizing literary thriller about the bond between two brothers and the evil they face in a small western North Carolina town. For a curious boy like Jess Hall, growing up in Marshall means trouble when your mother catches you spying on grown-ups. Adventurous and precocious, Jess is enormously protective of his older brother, Christopher, a mute whom everyone calls Stump. Though their mother has warned them not to snoop, Stump can’t help sneaking a look at something he’s not supposed to – an act that will have catastrophic repercussions, shattering both his world and Jess’s. It’s a wrenching event that thrusts Jess into an adulthood for which he’s not prepared. While there is much about the world that still confuses him, he now knows that a new understanding can bring not only a growing danger and evil – but also the possibility of freedom and deliverance as well. Told by three resonant and evocative characters – Jess; Adelaide Lyle, the town midwife and moral conscience; and Clem Barefield, a sheriff with his own painful past – A Land More Kind Than Home is a haunting tale of courage in the face of cruelty and the power of love to overcome the darkness that lives in us all. These are masterful portrayals, written with assurance and truth, and they show us the extraordinary promise of this remarkable first novel.

Purchase / Learn More



17 .) I Hate to See That Evening Sun Go Down by William Gay

 I Hate to See That Evening Sun Go Down Lists It Appears On:

  • Buzz Feed
  • Garden And Gun
  • Goodreads

William Gay established himself as “the big new name to include in the storied annals of Southern Lit” (Esquire) with his debut novel, The Long Home, and his highly acclaimed follow-up, Provinces of Night. Like Faulkner’s Mississippi and Cormac McCarthy’s American West, Gay’s Tennessee is redolent of broken souls. Mining that same fertile soil, his debut collection, I Hate to See That Evening Sun Go Down, brings together thirteen stories charting the pathos of interior lives. Among the colorful people readers meet are: old man Meecham, who escapes from his nursing home only to find his son has rented their homestead to “white trash”; Quincy Nell Qualls, who not only falls in love with the town lothario but, pregnant, faces an inescapable end when he abandons her; Finis and Doneita Beasley, whose forty-year marriage is broken up by a dead dog; and Bobby Pettijohn — awakened in the night by a search party after a body is discovered in his back woods. William Gay expertly sets these conflicted characters against lush backcountry scenery and defies our moral logic as we grow to love them for the weight of their human errors.

Purchase / Learn More



16 .) In Cold Blood by Truman Capote

 In Cold Blood Lists It Appears On:

  • Goodreads
  • Sandman Books
  • Solutions

On November 15, 1959, in the small town of Holcomb, Kansas, four members of the Clutter family were savagely murdered by blasts from a shotgun held a few inches from their faces. There was no apparent motive for the crime, and there were almost no clues. As Truman Capote reconstructs the murder and the investigation that led to the capture, trial, and execution of the killers, he generates both mesmerizing suspense and astonishing empathy. In Cold Blood is a work that transcends its moment, yielding poignant insights into the nature of American violence.

Purchase / Learn More



15 .) Light in August by William Faulkner

 Light in August Lists It Appears On:

  • Goodreads
  • Solutions
  • Susan Gabriel

Light in August, a novel that contrasts stark tragedy with hopeful perseverance in the face of mortality, features some of Faulkner’s most memorable characters: guileless, dauntless Lena Grove, in search of the father of her unborn child; Reverend Gail Hightower, a lonely outcast haunted by visions of Confederate glory; and Joe Christmas, a desperate, enigmatic drifter consumed by his mixed ancestry.

Purchase / Learn More



14 .) Other Voices, Other Rooms by Truman Capote

 Other Voices, Other Rooms Lists It Appears On:

  • Goodreads
  • Susan Gabriel
  • The Library

Published when Truman Capote was only twenty-three years old, Other Voices, Other Rooms is a literary touchstone of the mid-twentieth century. In this semiautobiographical coming-of-age novel, thirteen-year-old Joel Knox, after losing his mother, is sent from New Orleans to live with the father who abandoned him at birth. But when Joel arrives at Skully’s Landing, the decaying mansion in rural Alabama, his father is nowhere to be found. Instead, Joel meets his morose stepmother, Amy, eccentric cousin Randolph, and a defiant little girl named Idabel, who soon offers Joel the love and approval he seeks. Fueled by a world-weariness that belied Capote’s tender age, this novel tempers its themes of waylaid hopes and lost innocence with an appreciation for small pleasures and the colorful language of its time and place. This new edition, featuring an enlightening Introduction by John Berendt, offers readers a fresh look at Capote’s emerging brilliance as a writer of protean power and effortless grace. From the Hardcover edition.

Purchase / Learn More



13 .) Outer Dark by Cormac McCarthy

 Outer Dark Lists It Appears On:

  • Goodreads
  • Solutions
  • The Library

A woman bears her brother’s child, a boy, the brother leaves the baby in the woods and tells her he died of natural causes. Discovering her brother’s lie, she sets forth alone to find her son. Both brother and sister wander through a countryside being scourged by three terrifying strangers, toward an apocalyptic resolution.

Purchase / Learn More



12 .) Twilight by William Gay

 Twilight Lists It Appears On:

  • Goodreads
  • Gothic Society
  • Publishers Weekly

A Southern gothic novel about an undertaker who won’t let the dead rest. Suspecting that something is amiss with their father’s burial, teenager Kenneth Tyler and his sister Corrie venture to his gravesite and make a horrific discovery: their father, a whiskey bootlegger, was not actually buried in the casket they bought for him. Worse, they learn that the undertaker, Fenton Breece, has been grotesquely manipulating the dead. Armed with incriminating photographs, Tyler becomes obsessed with bringing the perverse undertaker to justice. But first, he must outrun Granville Sutter, a local strongman and convicted murderer hired by Fenton to destroy the evidence. What follows is an adventure through the Harrikin, an eerie backwoods filled with tangled roads, rusted machinery, and eccentric squatters–old men, witches, and families among them–who both shield and imperil Tyler as he runs for safety. With his poetic, haunting prose, William Gay rewrites the rules of the gothic fairy tale while exploring the classic Southern themes of good and evil.

Purchase / Learn More



11 .) A Rose for Emily by William Faulkner

 A Rose for Emily Lists It Appears On:

  • Goodreads
  • Gothic Society
  • Southern Living
  • Susan Gabriel

Emily is a member of a family in the antebellum Southern aristocracy; after the Civil War, the family has fallen on hard times.

Purchase / Learn More



10 .) A Streetcar Named Desire by Tennessee Williams

 A Streetcar Named Desire Lists It Appears On:

  • Goodreads
  • Sandman Books
  • Solutions
  • Susan Gabriel

Fading southern belle Blanche Dubois depends on the kindness of strangers and is adrift in the modern world. When she arrives to stay with her sister Stella in a crowded, boisterous corner of New Orleans, her delusions of grandeur bring her into conflict with Stella’s crude, brutish husband Stanley. Eventually their violent collision course causes Blanche’s fragile sense of identity to crumble, threatening to destroy her sanity and her one chance of happiness.

Purchase / Learn More



9 .) Midnight in the Garden of Good and Evil by John Berendt

 Midnight in the Garden of Good and Evil Lists It Appears On:

  • Goodreads
  • Sandman Books
  • Solutions
  • Susan Gabriel

A sublime and seductive reading experience. Brilliantly conceived and masterfully written, this enormously engaging portrait of a most beguiling Southern city has become a modern classic. Shots rang out in Savannah’s grandest mansion in the misty, early morning hours of May 2, 1981. Was it murder or self-defense? For nearly a decade, the shooting and its aftermath reverberated throughout this hauntingly beautiful city of moss-hung oaks and shaded squares. John Berendt’s sharply observed, suspenseful, and witty narrative reads like a thoroughly engrossing novel, and yet it is a work of nonfiction. Berendt skillfully interweaves a hugely entertaining first-person account of life in this isolated remnant of the Old South with the unpredictable twists and turns of a landmark murder case. It is a spellbinding story peopled by a gallery of remarkable characters: the well-bred society ladies of the Married Woman’s Card Club; the turbulent young redneck gigolo; the hapless recluse who owns a bottle of poison so powerful it could kill every man, woman, and child in Savannah; the aging and profane Southern belle who is the “soul of pampered self-absorption”; the uproariously funny black drag queen; the acerbic and arrogant antiques dealer; the sweet-talking, piano-playing con artist; young blacks dancing the minuet at the black debutante ball; and Minerva, the voodoo priestess who works her magic in the graveyard at midnight. These and other Savannahians act as a Greek chorus, with Berendt revealing the alliances, hostilities, and intrigues that thrive in a town where everyone knows everyone else.

Purchase / Learn More



8 .) The Ballad of the Sad Café by Carson McCullers

 The Ballad of the Sad Café Lists It Appears On:

  • Barnes & Noble
  • Goodreads
  • JC Sasser Books
  • Solutions

A classic work that has charmed generations of readers, this collection assembles Carson McCullers’s best stories, including her beloved novella “The Ballad of the Sad Café.” A haunting tale of a human triangle that culminates in an astonishing brawl, the novella introduces readers to Miss Amelia, a formidable southern woman whose café serves as the town’s gathering place. Among other fine works, the collection also includes “Wunderkind,” McCullers’s first published story written when she was only seventeen about a musical prodigy who suddenly realizes she will not go on to become a great pianist. Newly reset and available for the first time in a handsome trade paperback edition, The Ballad of the Sad Café is a brilliant study of love and longing from one of the South’s finest writers.

Purchase / Learn More



7 .) As I Lay Dying by William Faulkner

 As I Lay Dying Lists It Appears On:

  • Goodreads
  • Gothic Society
  • Solutions
  • Susan Gabriel
  • The Library

As I Lay Dying is Faulkner’s harrowing account of the Bundren family’s odyssey across the Mississippi countryside to bury Addie, their wife and mother. Narrated in turn by each of the family members—including Addie herself—as well as others the novel ranges in mood, from dark comedy to the deepest pathos. Considered one of the most influential novels in American fiction in structure, style, and drama, As I Lay Dying is a true 20th-century classic. This edition reproduces the corrected text of As I Lay Dying as established in 1985 by Noel Polk.

Purchase / Learn More



6 .) Beloved by Toni Morrison

 Beloved Lists It Appears On:

  • Book Riot
  • Goodreads
  • Solutions
  • Susan Gabriel
  • The Library
  • Unbound Worlds

“Staring unflinchingly into the abyss of slavery, this spellbinding novel transforms history into a story as powerful as Exodus and as intimate as a lullaby.

Sethe was born a slave and escaped to Ohio, but eighteen years later she is still not free. She has too many memories of Sweet Home, the beautiful farm where so many hideous things happened. Her new home is haunted by the ghost of her baby, who died nameless and whose tombstone is engraved with a single word: Beloved. “

Purchase / Learn More



5 .) Child of God by Cormac McCarthy

 Child of God Lists It Appears On:

  • Buzz Feed
  • Goodreads
  • Gothic Society
  • Publishers Weekly
  • Solutions
  • Susan Gabriel

In this taut, chilling novel, Lester Ballard–a violent, dispossessed man falsely accused of rape–haunts the hill country of East Tennessee when he is released from jail. While telling his story, Cormac McCarthy depicts the most sordid aspects of life with dignity, humor, and characteristic lyrical brilliance.

Purchase / Learn More



4 .) The Heart Is a Lonely Hunter by Carson McCullers

 The Heart Is a Lonely Hunter Lists It Appears On:

  • Goodreads
  • Gothic Society
  • JC Sasser Books
  • Southern Living
  • Susan Gabriel
  • The Library

An alternate cover for this ISBN can be found here. Carson McCullers’ prodigious first novel was published to instant acclaim when she was just twenty-three. Set in a small town in the middle of the deep South, it is the story of John Singer, a lonely deaf-mute, and a disparate group of people who are drawn towards his kind, sympathetic nature. The owner of the café where Singer eats every day, a young girl desperate to grow up, an angry drunkard, a frustrated black doctor: each pours their heart out to Singer, their silent confidant, and he in turn changes their disenchanted lives in ways they could never imagine. Contains Chronology, list of Further Reading and Notes.

Purchase / Learn More



3 .) To Kill a Mockingbird by Harper Lee

 To Kill a Mockingbird Lists It Appears On:

  • Book Riot
  • Goodreads
  • JC Sasser Books
  • Sandman Books
  • Solutions
  • Susan Gabriel

The unforgettable novel of a childhood in a sleepy Southern town and the crisis of conscience that rocked it, To Kill A Mockingbird became both an instant bestseller and a critical success when it was first published in 1960. It went on to win the Pulitzer Prize in 1961 and was later made into an Academy Award-winning film, also a classic. Compassionate, dramatic, and deeply moving, To Kill A Mockingbird takes readers to the roots of human behavior – to innocence and experience, kindness and cruelty, love and hatred, humor and pathos. Now with over 18 million copies in print and translated into forty languages, this regional story by a young Alabama woman claims universal appeal. Harper Lee always considered her book to be a simple love story. Today it is regarded as a masterpiece of American literature.

Purchase / Learn More



2 .) Swamplandia! by Karen Russell

 Swamplandia! Lists It Appears On:

  • Buzz Feed
  • Goodreads
  • Gothic Society
  • JC Sasser Books
  • Sandman Books
  • Susan Gabriel
  • The Library
  • Unbound Worlds

The Bigtree alligator-wrestling dynasty is in decline, and Swamplandia!, their island home and gator-wrestling theme park, formerly #1 in the region, is swiftly being encroached upon by a fearsome and sophisticated competitor called the World of Darkness. Ava’s mother, the park’s indomitable headliner, has just died; her sister, Ossie, has fallen in love with a spooky character known as the Dredgeman, who may or may not be an actual ghost; and her brilliant big brother, Kiwi, who dreams of becoming a scholar, has just defected to the World of Darkness in a last-ditch effort to keep their family business from going under. Ava’s father, affectionately known as Chief Bigtree, is AWOL; and that leaves Ava, a resourceful but terrified thirteen, to manage ninety-eight gators and the vast, inscrutable landscape of her own grief.

Purchase / Learn More



1 .) Wise Blood by Flannery O’Connor

 Wise Blood Lists It Appears On:

  • Buzz Feed
  • Garden And Gun
  • Goodreads
  • Gothic Society
  • Publishers Weekly
  • Southern Living
  • Susan Gabriel
  • The Library

Wise Blood, Flannery O’Connor’s astonishing and haunting first novel, is a classic of twentieth-century literature. It is a story of Hazel Motes, a twenty-two-year-old caught in an unending struggle against his innate, desperate faith. He falls under the spell of a “blind” street preacher named Asa Hawks and his degenerate fifteen-year-old daughter, Lily Sabbath. In an ironic, malicious gesture of his own non-faith, and to prove himself a greater cynic than Hawkes, Hazel Motes founds The Church of God Without Christ, but is still thwarted in his efforts to lose God. He meets Enoch Emery, a young man with “wise blood,” who leads him to a mummified holy child, and whose crazy maneuvers are a manifestation of Hazel’s existential struggles. This tale of redemption, retribution, false prophets, blindness, blindings, and wisdoms gives us one of the most riveting characters in twentieth-century American fiction.

Purchase / Learn More




The 150+ Additional Best Southern Gothic Literature



#BookAuthorLists
(Titles Appear On1 List Each)
542666Roberto BolañoBuzz Feed
553 by Flannery O’Connor: The Violent Bear It Away / Everything That Rises Must Converge / Wise BloodFlannery O’ConnorGoodreads
56A Childhood: The Biography of a PlaceHarry CrewsGoodreads
57A Choir of Ill Children
Unbound Worlds
58A Companion to American GothicOxfordre
59A Curtain of Green and Other StoriesEudora WeltyGoodreads
60A Feast of SnakesHarry CrewsGoodreads
61A New Companion to the GothicOxfordre
62A Tidewater MorningWilliam StyronGoodreads
63
African American Gothic: Screams from Shadowed Places
Oxfordre
64AirshipsSolutions
65Almost Famous WomenMegan Mayhew Bergman
Garden And Gun
66
American Gothic Fiction: An Introduction
Oxfordre
67
American Gothic: New Interventions in a National Narrative
Oxfordre
68An American Family: The Baby with the Curious MarkingsHarry CrewsGoodreads
69And the Ass Saw the AngelNick CaveGoodreads
70Be Free or Die: The Amazing Story of Robert Smalls’ Escape from Slavery to Union HeroCate Lineberry
Garden And Gun
71Beach MusicPat ConroyGoodreads
72
Best Not To Ask Too Many Questions About The Smell Coming From The Old Widder-Woman’s House On Yonder Hill
Star News
73
Between Them: Remembering My Parents
Bitter Southerner
74Beware the Wild
YA Book Central
75Big MachineVictor LaValleBuzz Feed
76Blood Meridian, or the Evening Redness in the WestCormac McCarthyGoodreads
77BodyHarry CrewsGoodreads
78BootlickerSteve PiacenteGoodreads
79Boy’s LifeRobert R. McCammonTor
80Bringing it to the Table: On Farming and FoodWendell Berry
Garden And Gun
81Camino IslandJohn Grisham
Garden And Gun
82Cane,Jean Toomer
Barnes & Noble
83CarHarry CrewsGoodreads
84CelebrationHarry CrewsGoodreads
85Cold MountainCharles FrazierBook Riot
86Collected StoriesWilliam FaulknerGoodreads
87Collected StoriesCarson McCullersGoodreads
88Compulsion (The Heirs of Watson Island, #1)Martina BooneGoodreads
89
Critical Insights: Southern Gothic Literature
Oxfordre
90Crooked Letter, Crooked LetterTom FranklinGoodreads
91Cthulhu: The Mythos and Kindred HorrorsRobert E. HowardTor
92Dangerous Deception
YA Book Central
93Dark DebtsKaren HallThe Library
94Desperation Road
Bitter Southerner
95Ellen FosterKay Gibbons
JC Sasser Books
96Empire of the Summer MoonS. C. Gwynne
Garden And Gun
97Exquisite CorpsePoppy Z
This Is Horror
98Fallen LandTaylor BrownGoodreads
99FearRonald Kelly
This Is Horror
100
Flight Path: A Search For Roots Beneath The World’s Busiest Airport
Bitter Southerner
101Four and Twenty Blackbirds
Unbound Worlds
102GalvestonNic PizzolattoBuzz Feed
103Give Us a KissDaniel WoodrellGoodreads
104Gone SouthRobert R. McCammonGoodreads
105
Gothic America: Narrative, History, and Nation
Oxfordre
106
Gothic Traditions and Narrative Techniques in the Fiction of Eudora Welty
Oxfordre
107Gradle BirdJ.C. SasserGoodreads
108H. P. Lovecraft: TalesH. P. LovecraftBuzz Feed
109
History of the Gothic: American Gothic
Oxfordre
110Horror In The ChurchStar News
111
I Drink Because This House Is Filthy And All The Servants Have Fled
Star News
112In the Heart of the Dark WoodBilly CoffeyGoodreads
113It’s Too Hot For Justice TodayStar News
114Jesus’ SonDenis JohnsonBuzz Feed
115
Johnny’s Cash and Charley’s Pride: Lasting Legends and Untold Adventures in Country Music
Bitter Southerner
116Last DaysBrian EvensonBuzz Feed
117Looking for Salvation at the Dairy QueenSusan Gregg GilmoreGoodreads
118
Love and Death in the American Novel
Oxfordre
119Magic City Gospel
Bitter Southerner
120Music of the SwampLewis NordanGoodreads
121My Sunshine AwayM.O. WalshGoodreads
122night, MotherMarsha NormanGoodreads
123No Country for Old MenCormac McCarthyBook Riot
124No One Is Coming to Save Us
Bitter Southerner
125
No One Listens To What Old Pap’s Got To Say, On Account Of This Deformity, But I Say It’s You All What Has The Deformity, In Your Souls, I Knows What I’ve Seen
Star News
126Once in a Blue MoonVicki Covington
Garden And Gun
127OTHER READINGBuzz Feed
128Otis Redding: An Unfinished LifeJonathan Gould
Garden And Gun
129Over the Plain HousesJulia FranksGoodreads
130ParadiseToni Morrison
JC Sasser Books
131PHILOSOPHYBuzz Feed
132
Race Isn’t An Issue In This Town Because We Never Discuss It
Star News
133Reads to Revisit This Summer
Garden And Gun
134Red LoryDave NewellGoodreads
135Reflections in a Golden EyeCarson McCullersGoodreads
136Scar LoverHarry CrewsGoodreads
137Servants of the Storm
YA Book Central
138Sewing HolesDarlyn Finch KuhnGoodreads
139Sharp ObjectsGillian FlynnThe Library
140Sing, Unburied, SingJesmyn WardGoodreads
141Some Small MagicBilly CoffeyGoodreads
142
Someone Is Going To Have To Shoot The Dog Before It Reaches The Courthouse
Star News
143South and West: From a Notebook
Bitter Southerner
144
Southern Aberrations: Writers of the American South and the Problems of Regionalism
Oxfordre
145Southern Cross the DogBill ChengThe Library
146Southern Gothic ShortsPhillip J. Moreledge
Southern Living
147Southern Gothic: New Tales of the SouthJordan M. ScogginsGoodreads
148Steal Away HomeBilly CoffeyGoodreads
149Sunshine State: EssaysSarah Gerard
Garden And Gun
150Swan SongRobert R
This Is Horror
151The Adventures of Huckleberry FinnMark TwainGoodreads
152The Adventures of Tom SawyerMark TwainGoodreads
153The AnswersCatherine Lacey
Garden And Gun
154The Artisans
YA Book Central
155The AwakeningKate Chopin
Gothic Society
156The Best of H.P. Lovecraft: Bloodcurdling Tales of Horror and the MacabreH.P. LovecraftTor
157The Big SleepRaymond ChandlerBuzz Feed
158
The Cambridge Companion to the Modern Gothic
Oxfordre
159The Complete Short StoriesAmbrose BierceBuzz Feed
160The Conspiracy Against the Human RaceThomas LigottiBuzz Feed
161The Curse of Crow HollowBilly CoffeyGoodreads
162The Death of Sweet MisterDaniel WoodrellGoodreads
163The Devil All the TimeDonald Ray PollockGoodreads
164The Devil Walks in MattinglyBilly CoffeyGoodreads
165The ElementalsMichael McDowellGoodreads
166The Feast of All SaintsAnne Rice
Sandman Books
167The Gospel SingerHarry CrewsGoodreads
168The Grass Harp, Including A Tree of Night and Other StoriesTruman CapoteGoodreads
169The Great God PanSolutions
170The Great SantiniPat ConroyGoodreads
171The Heavenly TableDonald Ray PollockThe Library
172The HelpKathryn StockettBook Riot
173The HistorianSolutions
174The Imago Sequence & Other StoriesLaird BarronBuzz Feed
175The Keepers of the HouseShirley Ann GrauGoodreads
176The Kestrel WatersRandy ThornhornGoodreads
177The King in YellowRobert W. ChambersBuzz Feed
178The Knockout ArtistHarry CrewsGoodreads
179The Legend of the Albino FarmSteve YatesThe Library
180The Long HomeWilliam GayGoodreads
181The Lords of DisciplinePat ConroyGoodreads
182The Lottery and Other StoriesShirley JacksonBuzz Feed
183The Old Gods WakenManly Wade WellmanTor
184The Orchard KeeperCormac McCarthyGoodreads
185The Outlaw AlbumDaniel WoodrellThe Library
186
The Outsider Wore Shoes And A Smug Expression
Star News
187
The Palgrave Handbook of the Southern Gothic
Oxfordre
188
The Potlikker Papers: A Food History of the Modern South
Bitter Southerner
189The Preacher-Man LeeredStar News
190The Prince of TidesPat ConroyGoodreads
191The Red, Red Dirt UnderstandsStar News
192The ResurrectionistMatthew GuinnGoodreads
193The River of Kings
Bitter Southerner
194The Temptation to ExistE. M. CioranBuzz Feed
195The VanishersHeidi JulavitsBuzz Feed
196The Vine That Ate the South
Bitter Southerner
197
The Waitress Served Biscuits In A Manner Both Polite Yet Somehow Unwelcoming
Star News
198The Water is WidePat ConroyGoodreads
199The Weight of BloodLaura McHughGoodreads
200The WildsJulia ElliottGoodreads
201The Yonahlossee Riding Camp for GirlsAnton DiSclafani
Garden And Gun
202There Will Be StarsBilly CoffeyGoodreads
203
There’s A Sense Of Malaise And Decay Hovering Over This Old Plantation; I Can’t Imagine What Lies In The Not-So-Distant Past That Caused It
Star News
204
They Always Did Think Too Highly Of Themselves
Star News
205This Dark Road to MercyWiley CashGoodreads
206
Through the Pale Door: A Guide to and through the American Gothic
Oxfordre
207Thus Spake ZarathustraFriedrich NietzscheBuzz Feed
208Tobacco RoadErskine CaldwellGoodreads
209Tomato RedDaniel WoodrellGoodreads
210Turtle: The American Contrition of Franz FerdinandMik EverettGoodreads
211
Undead Souths: The Gothic and Beyond in Southern Literature and Culture
Oxfordre
212Understanding Cormac McCarthyOxfordre
213
Vines Cover The Mansion Much As The Inescapable Past Covers My Ruined Life
Star News
214
We Bury Our Feelings And Our Relatives Alive
Star News
215
We Don’t Speak Of What Happened To The Girl
Star News
216Welding with ChildrenTim Gautreaux
Barnes & Noble
217
Why, This House Represents The Last Vestige Of A Grandeur This Town Could Never Hope To Regain, And We Wouldn’t Sell It For The World
Star News
218William Faulkner’s Gothic DomainOxfordre


20 Best Southern Gothic Book Sources/Lists



SourceArticle
Barnes & Noble Totally Mad for Southern Gothic? Five Books You’ve Got to Read …
Bitter Southerner Bitter Southerner Summer Reading Roundup 2017 — THE BITTER …
Book Riot 8 of the Best Southern Historical Novels Where Place is a …
Buzz Feed A “True Detective” Reading List
Garden And Gun Southern Summer Reads – Garden & Gun
Goodreads Best Southern Gothic Literature (205 books)
Gothic Society Best southern Gothic novels
JC Sasser Books 10 Favorite Southern Gothic Novels by Female Authors
Oxfordre Southern Gothic Literature
Publishers Weekly 10 Best Southern Gothic Books
Sandman Books A Season For Southern Gothic Literature | Sandman Book Company …
Solutions 16 Best Southern gothic books 2018
Southern Living Southern Gothic Literature List
Star News “The Best Southern Gothic Novel Ever” |
Susan Gabriel A List of Best Southern Gothic Novels
The Library Southern Gothic Literature
This Is Horror Top 5 authors who helped shape Southern Horror – This Is Horror
Tor Five Books About Backwoods Horror | Tor.com
Unbound Worlds So You Want to Read Southern Gothic: Here’s Where to Start …
YA Book Central All southern gothic books

You Might Also Like